Study Guide

The Unvanquished

The Unvanquished Summary

Bayard Sartoris and his slave/friend (yeah, it's weird, but they seem to get along) Ringo are a couple of kids from Mississippi growing up during the Civil War. Sartoris' dad, John, is an officer in the Confederate army who is away fighting, so Bayard's grandmother is in charge of the house while he's gone.

Then one day John comes home and it becomes clear that things aren't going too well in the war.  He has the boys and the slaves, Joby and Loosh, help him build a pen to hide their livestock from the Union army (a.k.a. the Yankees) and he buries household silver in a trunk in the garden. Seems like a safe way to stay Confederate.

John rides off to fight again, and the boys (Bayard and Ringo) feel they must defend their house. Yeah, even though they're pre-pubescent. They see some Union soldiers coming, and shoot at them. Oops. They run home and they know they've got to hide.

But where? Under Granny's skirts, of course.

The soldiers come in looking for them. Luckily, their commander, Colonel Dick, orders all the other soldiers out, even though it's clear he knows the boys are hiding under Granny's dress. They chat for a minute and he leaves too. Whew!

Granny makes the boys wash out their mouths with soap for having said, "We shot the bastud!" Yes, they could have died, but the swearing thing is definitely the worst part.

Fast-forward. Granny takes Bayard, Ringo, Joby, and the trunk full of silver by wagon to Memphis, because she dreamed she saw a man pointing out where it was buried to some soldiers (everyone knows it's Loosh, the slave no one trusts, in her dream). On the way, though, some Yankees steal their mules. Bayard and Ringo run off, leaving Granny behind but coincidentally running into John (yup, Bayard's dad), who uses them in a battle (yup, not cool for a dad).

They rebury the silver, but this time Loosh really does show some Yankees where it's buried, and also up and leaves with his wife, Philadelphy, as the Northern soldiers burn down the Sartoris home. After living in Joby's cabin for a bit, Granny, Bayard, and Ringo once again pack up and head off to visit some family in Hawkhurst. Bayard is deeply impressed by his Cousin Drusilla, who acts and dresses like a man after her fiancé was killed in battle.

The boys and Granny follow Drusilla to a river, where escaped slaves are trying to cross, but they fall in when the Union soldiers blow up the bridge. It's kind of a freaky moment.

Due to a clerical error, Granny and the boys end up with a letter saying they are entitled to 110 mules, 110 slaves, and ten trunks of silver, rather than the two mules, two slaves, and one trunk that they lost in the Yankee raid.

Once Granny sees how handy the letter is for getting mules, she, Ringo, and a neighbor, Ab Snopes, start forging letters and stealing mules from the Yankees, only to sell them right back and make a profit. Granny is a big-hearted woman, though, and also lends the mules to the poor white people who live around the Sartoris plantation; she also prays for forgiveness regularly, which basically makes it okay.

Ab Snopes turns out to be an untrustworthy partner though, and sells Granny out as the last of the Union troops are leaving the region. He then convinces her to forge a Confederate General's signature to trick some Southern bandits into giving up their horses, which Bayard and Ringo know is a bad idea. Yeah, it is such a bad idea that it gets her killed. This is a shocker: Granny was our rock! (Oh, not just for the boys—we freaked out too.)

With the help of another neighbor, Uncle Buck, Bayard and Ringo track Ab Snopes and the bandit Grumby, the man who killed Granny. Uncle Buck gets shot in an altercation and has to head home, so the boys go on alone. They finally catch him and bring his hand back to nail onto Granny's tombstone. Now that's vengeance served up cold.

Drusilla, in the meantime, has joined John's regiment and fights with the men, which scandalizes her mother. Mom shows up and makes Drusilla wear a dress. Then she makes Drusilla and John get married. Hey, it's wartime: that makes the cousin thing not seem like that big of a deal.

Fast-forward. Bayard is now off at college, studying law, when he gets word his father has died. Bayard knows he's expected to seek revenge for his father's murder, but, well, he doesn't really want to. He faces his father's murderer unarmed, which is pretty brave if you ask us. But it does the trick: the killer dashes outta town on a southbound train.

  • Chapter 1: Ambuscade

    Section 1

    • Bayard, the narrator, and Ringo, his slave, friend, and possible half-brother, build a map of the ongoing Civil War in the woodpile behind their house.
    • Loosh, Ringo's uncle, destroys Vicksburg on their map (more info on that little tidbit here). Which implies that the Southern cause is not going so well.
    • Bayard says that his father, John, is fighting in Tennessee, but Loosh says that it isn't true because the Yankees have already made it to Mississippi. Who's got the facts here?
    • Ringo and Bayard play war for a while, until suddenly Bayard's dad comes galloping down the driveway on his horse, Jupiter.

    Section 2

    • John, Joby, Ringo, Loosh, and Bayard build a stock pen in the creek bottom so that no one will be able to find their animals.
    • After they fill it with the livestock, the boys try to stay awake to hear some war stories, but mean ol' dad sends them to bed.
    • John orders Loosh to bury a trunk filled with the family's silver. While the boys are asleep, Daddy-o heads off to war again.

    Section 3

    • Granny reads a cookbook to Ringo and Bayard (sometimes you just get tired of picture books).
    • Afterward Bayard says they have to watch Loosh because of a dream he had. Since Loosh knew that Vicksburg had fallen before anyone else, in the dream John told Bayard that he should watch him to know what was going to happen.
    • The boys spend their days and nights following Loosh, and overhear him talking to his wife, Philadelphy, about how General Sherman will free all the slaves.
    • Now the boys decide they have to watch the road to be ready when Sherman comes, and they finally do see Yankees coming on horseback. They run home, grab the musket, and head back to the road, where they shoot at one of the riders. Uh-oh.

    Section 4

    • The boys run home and tell Granny that they shot the "bastud." Before she can figure out what's going on, the house is surrounded by Union soldiers. Super uh-oh.
    • Granny sits down and makes the boys hide under her skirts, and then the Yankees come in looking for the boys.
    • She says that there are no children at the place, and that she's never seen the gun before in her life, but the soldiers don't believe her and start searching her house.
    • Finally it comes out that what they shot (and killed) was a horse, not a man. Which is a small relief, unless you really have a thing for horses (still, it's not as punishable, you know).
    • Then a Colonel comes in and tells the sergeant who's questioning Granny to leave her alone. He also makes it clear that he knows exactly where the two boys are.
    • When it's all over and the boys come out from under her dress, Granny makes them clean out their mouths with soap. Yes, they are in trouble for having said "bastud," not for almost getting them all killed by Union soldiers.

    Section 5

    • The boys wash out their mouths with soap, and say that Tennessee is "too far to go just to fight Yankees." Yes, it's a funny ending for the first section.
  • Chapter 2: Retreat

    Section 1

    • Granny has Loosh get the wagon out and load everything in it. She says that she'll do what John told her and dig up the silver and head to Memphis.
    • When Louvinia says that it would be better to leave the silver buried and safe, Granny tells her that she had a dream that a black man was pointing to where the trunk was buried. And we know dreams are to be trusted as far as this lil' book is concerned.
    • Joby wants to put the trunk directly into the wagon and leave it overnight because it's so heavy, but Granny makes him, Loosh, Ringo, and Bayard carry it upstairs behind her bed.
    • She locks her bedroom door, which Ringo and Bayard didn't even know had a key.
    • Louvinia sends the boys to bed.

    Section 2

    • The boys put on their Sunday best in the morning, and Granny makes Joby put the musket into the wagon, even though he says they won't need it. A nice 'nother dash of foreboding.
    • Granny makes Joby and Loosh bring the trunk back down the stairs and load it into the wagon. She, Ringo, Bayard, and Joby head out. Bye bye, childhood home.
    • They leave Granny at a neighbor's, Mrs. Compson's, to say goodbye, and head into town to pick up some supplies from the store.
    • Uncle Buck McCaslin comes over hollering at them because he recognizes Bayard as John Sartoris' son. A Confederate captain also approaches to listen. First Uncle Buck praises John's bravery, but then he calls him a fool because he is too afraid to stay home from the war (which Uncle Buck clearly did).
    • He also says that Sartoris doesn't fight; he just steals horses.
    • Uncle Buck tells the boys to take care of Granny, and they head back to pick her up.
    • They go down to get a drink during a break and Bayard gives Ringo some dirt from home in exchange for a buckle off of the saddle on the Yankee horse they had shot the summer before. Aw.
    • On the road again, some Confederate soldiers ride up and tell Granny that the road is full of Yankee patrols, and that it would be best to delay their journey. She says she'll do what Colonel Sartoris told her to, which is keep going to Memphis.
    • They ride for a couple of days, passing burnt-down houses, when suddenly some Yankees surround them, steal their mules, and ride off again.
    • Ringo and Bayard run off after the mules, but they can't catch them and they steal a white horse from a nearby barn. It may be pretty, but it sure is slow, and they can't keep up with their mules.
    • They follow their tracks, though, which Ringo says are leading back home.
    • Suddenly they are attacked again and they hide in a briar patch, but it's Bayard's own father who fishes them out. Coincidence! First thing's first: he asks where Granny is.
    • They admit that they forgot her (nice going, brats), and they all head back to get her. But she's already gone.
    • The boys get to ride some "borrowed" Yankee horses back home. On their way John spots a Yankee camp and tells the boys to surround them. He tells them to make lots of noise, so that they will think there are more of them than there are. Smart thinkin'.
    • They capture all of the Yankees' food, clothes, horses, and weapons, and let them sneak off in the night wearing their blankets.

    Section 3

    • John, Bayard, and Ringo arrive home at the same time that Granny does. She doesn't even acknowledge them. Can you blame her? They forgot her, after all.
    • She has her own set of "borrowed" horses and won't say where she got them. Uh huh…
    • After dinner the next day fifty Union soldiers show up and John takes off running, leaving everyone else to figure out what to do on their own.
    • So many things going on! Loosh showed the soldiers where the silver is buried. The soldiers have set the house on fire. Granny is beside herself. Can you blame her?
    • Loosh and Philadelphy leave, considering themselves freed, and Granny, Ringo, and Bayard are left behind saying over and over "The bastuds!"
    • This time she does not wash their mouths out with soap.
  • Chapter 3: Raid

    Section 1

    • Granny writes a note to Mrs. Compson and sends Ringo and Bayard to take it to her. Mrs. Compson gives them a hat, parasol, and mirror, and they walk back home. Yes, it seemed important to us, too.
    • That afternoon they get the wagon ready again, and Granny writes down the name of the Colonel who had been at the house the day the boys shot the horse so she won't forget it. Colonel Nathaniel G. Dick. How could anyone forget a name like that?
    • They go to bed in Joby's cabin, since their house has burned down, and the next day they get into the wagon once again and take off.
    • Granny's plan is to find Colonel Dick, recover her silver, her slaves, and the mules, and come back home.
    • They travel for six days and see a lot of dust kicked up in the distance. They pass a lot of white women and children standing outside their burnt-down houses. They also see about fifty freed slaves coming up the road at night.
    • One of them, a woman with a baby, is unable to keep up, so Granny gives her a ride in the wagon. She gets out at a creek bottom, and when they head off again Ringo says she had caught up to her group again.

    Section 2

    • After six days of travel the group arrives at Hawkhurst, where Bayard's cousins and aunt live. His Cousin Denny runs up shouting, telling them that they, too, are living in a slave's cabin because their house was burned down. What are the odds?
    • (High.)
    • Denny takes Ringo and Bayard to see what the Yankees did to the railroad. Yup, it's destroyed.
    • Then Cousin Drusilla rides up, so they run over to ask what she saw at the river where the freed slaves are trying to cross.
    • She explains that ever since the Yankees came through and burned down the house, freed slaves have been walking to the river, singing. When they get to the river, though, they don't have a way to cross and go crazy trying to get to the other side. Yes, crazy.
    • Cousin Drusilla promises to take everyone to see, which her mother does not approve of. Granny says she will go, though, because she is after her silver.
    • Finally, when they're supposed to be asleep, Drusilla tells them the story of a crazy railroad chase (coincidentally, very similar to the real-life Andrews Raid, or "Great Locomotive Chase," in 1862).
    • The boys go to bed, but Drusilla doesn't. She says she's quit sleeping ever since the war started. What a badass. She is excited about the chance to escape her fate of being a proper Southern belle, all thanks to the war. How's that for a tomboy?
    • She makes Bayard promise that when he sees his father that he'll ask him to let her come fight with him. Bayard promises.
    • The next morning they start along the road, which is full of freed slaves headed to the river on foot. When they get there, the Yankees are crossing on a bridge, but beat everyone else back because they're going to blow it up once they're across.
    • Granny won't back down, though, because she is intent on that silver, and when the explosion makes a bang the wagon falls into the river with Granny, Bayard, and Ringo in it. Drusilla is on her own horse and they are separated.
    • Luckily, the wagon floats.

    Section 3

    • The Yankees help the stranded family ashore and take Granny to Colonel Dick. Yup, she guessed it right: he is there at the camp.
    • She explains that she's there to get her silver, her "darkies" (that's politically incorrect language for her slaves), and her mules. The Colonel is willing to help her out and gets his little assistant to make out a note. This guy screws up, though, and writes down that she's missing ten chests of silver, 110 mules, and 110 slaves. Bonanza!
    • They hand over all the slaves that they have, and Granny doesn't really know what to do with them. They also load ten chests onto her wagon and a send a lot of mules on their way with her.
    • The group rides all night, and when the sun comes up Granny reads the letter and realizes what's gone wrong. She also says that it's not their fault because they didn't understand what the mistake was, and that it must be the hand of God helping them along.
    • Some Yankee officers ride up, and Granny is prepared to tell them the truth, but when they see the paper they just give them even more mules to bring them up to the 110 they are supposedly due.
    • That night Granny tells all of the slaves that they are to go home, and then divides up the food they were given among all of them.
    • They continue their ride and pass some more Yankees. These ones have horses, which are better than mules. Ringo tells the lieutenant that they are due twelve horses, and the lieutenant has to give them up because he sees the Colonel's signature on the letter.
    • Finally they arrive back home and Granny makes Ringo and Bayard kneel down and pray for forgiveness for the sin of stealing.
  • Chapter 4: Riposte in Tertio

    Section 1

    • Ringo, Joby, and Bayard build a pen for their new livestock, and Ab Snopes takes nine mules into town to sell. He and Granny argue over the price. They've got a nice business going, selling mules that they got with the letter back to the Yankees.
    • Ab Snopes leaves; Granny tells the boys to go to bed.
    • The next day, Ab Snopes comes by to help build the fence. Granny and Ringo draft a new letter, with a forged signature, that they'll use to trick the Yankees into giving them more mules. It turns out they've been running this scam for months, sometimes stealing and selling back the same mules over and over.
    • For this letter Granny calls herself Plurella Harris, and signs it as General Smith. In the morning they ride out, with Ab Snopes behind them, to a Yankee camp. She presents the letter to the commanding officer, who grumbles but gives her the mules she says she's entitled to.
    • They hand the mules over to Ab, who's waiting in the woods, and head off in separate directions. Unfortunately the officer they tricked comes riding after them, looking for the mules. He says that there's an order out to watch out for Granny because she's made quite a dent in the Union's mule stock. He gets really irritated when she claims not to know what he's talking about.
    • Ringo, thinking quickly, yells from the woods in the opposite direction that Snopes went to call the Yankees off his trail, and it works.
    • Granny and Bayard head out on the double, leaving the wagon behind and hiding in the woods. Once the Union soldiers come back, see that they're gone, and leave again (with their wagon), they start walking. Ringo shows up in a stolen buggy and takes everyone home.
    • And with that, the jig is up.

    Section 2

    • The next day is Sunday, and at church Granny stands up and announces publicly that she has sinned. She asks everyone there to pray for her.
    • Then she goes to the front of the church, opens up her big account book, and opens the tin can where she keeps her money.
    • She gets everyone to come forward, one at a time, and account for the money she had given them or the mules she had loaned them. Sometimes she'd have one person give their mule to another, just to even things up. It was a complicated business, yo.
    • Brother Fortinbride, the soldier-turned-preacher, says he doesn't need any money, even though Granny insists.
    • Ab Snopes comes over the next morning and complains that the Yankees have all gone, and there's no one to sell the last batch of stolen mules to.

    Section 3

    • Later on a group of Union officers shows up and sees Ringo drawing a picture of the house before it was burned down. He's looking for Granny, and also knows that the pen is down at the creek bottom. He sends his soldiers there to get the stolen livestock.
    • As he's leaving, the officer gives Granny a ten-dollar voucher for damage done to her fence. He begs her not to forge his signature on a thousand-dollar voucher it because he would be held responsible and she could ruin him. Guess he knows her tactics. Anyway, she promises not to.
    • Afterward Granny takes the boys to church and makes them kneel while she prays for forgiveness one more time.
    • Ringo realizes that Ab Snopes was the one who told so that he could get the last of the money with the payoff. Traitor!

    Section 4

    • Ab Snopes tries to get Granny to forge another letter, and the boys tell her it's a bad idea.
    • It turns out that there is a group called Grumby's Independents that are terrorizing the south. They're Southerners who are taking advantage of the fact that the Yankees are gone and that most of the women are living on their own with their kids, so they're all about stealing and torturing people.
    • Snopes's idea is to forget a letter from a Confederate general this time, General Forrest, ordering Grumby to give up the four nice horses he's using in his raids. Sounds tricky.
    • They ride to where Grumby is hiding out, and Granny makes the boys stay in the wagon because she says they won't hurt a woman, but might hurt them because they "look like men."
    • Bayard tries to hold her back, not letting her go, but she just looks at him and makes him cry like a little boy.
    • Granny explains that she's taking the risk so that they'll have some money when John gets home.
    • After a while they can't stand it anymore and go running after her. The boys go into an abandoned compress (a place where cotton is baled), and find Granny there, murdered.
  • Chapter 5: Vendée

    Section 1

    • All the people from town and the surrounding countryside come to Granny's funeral. Many of them are riding the mules she lent to them.
    • Brother Fortinbride tells the men to start digging, and they do. They bury Granny, and Brother Fortinbride says that Granny wouldn't have wanted everyone standing in the rain when there's work to be done, so everyone goes home.
    • Uncle Buck, who helped to bury her, asks the boys what they're going to do now.
    • Bayard tells him he wants to borrow a pistol.
    • Uncle Buck says that he will give him the pistol. Also that he's going with them.
    • Ringo says something about killing Ab Snopes, and Uncle Buck takes them up to Snopes's place. They sneak around the back and see the horses that Snopes had been after all along in a hidden pen.
    • Uncle Buck says that Ab Snopes is working with Grumby now that Granny is "out of business," and then goes to the front of the house to find out where Snopes is.
    • A woman answers the door and says that he's gone to Alabama, which Uncle Buck takes to mean that he must be in the other direction.

    Section 2

    • The three men ride on mules for a couple of months, searching for Grumby. One day they find a burned-down house with a dying woman. She tells them how many were in the gang that had attacked her and asks them to kill them.
    • One night Ringo climbs onto a house and falls through the roof. Guess who's there? A meeting of Grumby's men. Sadly for the avengers, they get away.
    • Another night a man with black hair covering his hands shows up at their fire and says he's looking for a man named Grumby. Ringo slips up and tells the man they're after Ab Snopes. He leaves, and as he goes tells them to stick with Snopes and leave Grumby alone.
    • He also fires at them as he leaves and hits Uncle Buck's arm.
    • The boys doctor it up the best they can, but Uncle Buck isn't doing well. The next day they see a dead moccasin (a poisonous snake) frozen in the ground. Uncle Buck thinks it's a sign, and suddenly they hear some horses galloping off. They continue until they see what the commotion was: it's Ab Snopes, tied to a tree on the ground.
    • They untie him and he claims that he had been captured by Grumby. Then he apologizes, and begs for mercy.
    • Bayard beats him up for a while, but he falls to the ground and won't get up anymore. Which makes beating him up not as fun.
    • In the end Uncle Buck and Ab Snopes ride back home because of Buck's hurt arm, and Ringo and Bayard continue on together.

    Section 3

    • It rains all the time during the boys' final journey after Grumby, and finally, when it stops, they see another sign.
    • It's a black man, hanging from a tree over the road, with a note pinned to him saying to turn back and signed "G."
    • There's a P.S. on the note, probably written by the man with the hairy hands, also begging the boys to turn back for their own safety.
    • The boys keep riding and Hairy Hands jumps out of the bushes and says that they have to stay where they are, that he'll be watching, and then hides again.
    • Three more guys come out, with the one in the middle tied up. It's Grumby, and the two men cut his hands free and train their pistols on him so he can't move. The two men say that Grumby is a coward and ruined what they had going. Then they say they're headed to Texas and ride off.
    • Grumby shoots at them but they get away.
    • He's still got two shots left, though, and suddenly shoots at Bayard. Ringo tackles him, but Grumby gets away. Bayard shoots him in the back as he runs.

    Section 4

    • The boys go that night to the old compress, where Granny was killed, and then ride home.
    • They stop at the cemetery on their way.
    • When they get home they find out John and Drusilla are already there, and that they went off with Uncle Buck to search for the boys.
    • The boys sleep like rocks after their terrible journey, and wake up to John, Uncle Buck, and Drusilla hollering about how they nailed Grumby's body to the door of the old compress and his right hand to Granny's grave marker.
    • And that's how justice is served.
  • Chapter 6: Skirmish at Sartoris

    Section 1

    • Bayard had received a letter from his Aunt Louisa addressed to Granny, talking about how upset she was that Drusilla had decided to act like a man and go to battle.
    • Another letter comes, and this one also talks about how worried Aunt Louisa is about Drusilla's honor. She wants John and Drusilla to tie the knot because that would make the whole thing less disgraceful.

    Section 2

    • A third letter comes to Mrs. Compson. By this time Drusilla and John are back living at home, because the war has ended. Mrs. Compson and a Mrs. Habersham come to visit and see what Aunt Louisa is so upset about.
    • It seems that the ladies think she's pregnant—as if that's the reason she hides in men's clothes, working down by the creek.
    • When Drusilla realizes what they suspect she takes off running, and Bayard finds her in the cabin with Louvinia. Drusilla is crying, saying that she just went to war "to hurt Yankees" and that there's nothing between her and John.
    • Aunt Louisa then shows up, but no one pays her much mind because everyone is busy working on rebuilding the town and the houses. Which should give you a sense of what's actually important at a time like this.
    • One day Ringo comes back from town and announces that he's no longer a "nigger" because he's "been abolished."
    • He also explains that an escaped slave, Cassius Q. Benbow, is running for Marshal of Jefferson and that that's why all the white people, like John, are so worried.
    • It turns out that two men from Missouri have come to organize the black people in the south and make them into Republicans. John and the others are working against this.
    • Meanwhile, Aunt Louisa makes it known that she wants Drusilla married to John, and she conquers her daughter by making her put on a dress.

    Section 3

    • The next day the ladies come over to get the wedding reception ready, while everyone else is more worried about the election that is taking place on the same day.
    • Cousin Denny and Ringo come riding in, shouting that John and Drusilla have killed the two Missouri organizers. The women are more upset that they missed their wedding than about the potential murder charges.
    • After John killed the men, he took charge of the ballot box, appointing Drusilla voting commissioner and carrying it back home under guard.
    • Back at the house Aunt Louisa throws a fit because Drusilla forgot ("forgot") to get married. They have the election then and there, and then ride back into town with the box and get hitched. That's one way to get two birds with one stone.
  • Chapter 7: An Odor of Verbena

    Section 1

    • Bayard is now off at school in Oxford, Mississippi. One day he gets word from Ringo that his father is dead.
    • They ride back home and Ringo offers to go kill John's murderer, but Bayard refuses.

    Section 2

    • Bayard remembers a time that he and Drusilla had walked in the garden and talked about the dreams of the Southern men they had known. Dreams to build up a country.
    • Bayard had argued that his father had killed too many people to see any possibility for good for the poor people who lived around him. But Drusilla said that he was right to kill the northern invaders.
    • Four years later, the summer before his father's death (we're still in a flashback), they had walked again in the garden. John had been busy working as state legislator after beating Ben Redmond in the race.
    • John had bullied Redmond, provoking him and calling him a coward. That's one way to legislate.
    • During the walk, Drusilla had asked Bayard to kiss her, and he did after protesting.
    • Afterward he confesses to his father, but John doesn't really seem to care. Guess that's what happens when you put an election before your own wedding.

    Section 3

    • When Ringo and Bayard get home, there are a bunch of men there to receive them. George Wyatt, a friend of John's, offers to take care of it for Bayard, but he says that he'll do it himself.
    • Bayard sends all the men home and goes into the house. Drusilla and his Aunt Jenny, his father's sister, and Louvinia are all there.
    • Drusilla gives him two pistols and speaks poetically about justice and retribution. She kisses his hand, but suddenly seems to realize that Bayard doesn't have the same lust for revenge that she does, and starts laughing hysterically.
    • Aunt Jenny has Louvinia take Drusilla upstairs, and then tells Bayard that he doesn't have to kill Redmond.
    • Then she leaves him alone, and he "pants" from regret and grief and despair. Yes, pants.

    Section 4

    • In the morning Ringo and Bayard get the horses ready, and then he (Bayard) says goodbye to Aunt Jenny.
    • Then he goes upstairs to see Drusilla, but she is still upset about having kissed his hand and Louvinia takes him back downstairs. There, Aunt Jenny tells him the story of an Englishman she knew in Charleston who only knew seven words: "I'll have rum, thanks" and "No bloody moon."
    • She repeats "No bloody moon" to Bayard, which is kind of weird and cryptic, if you ask us.
    • Ringo and Bayard ride into town, and a bunch of John's friends are waiting there for them.
    • Bayard goes into Redmond's office on his own, but before he does he says, "No bloody moon" to George Wyatt. He doesn't get it either.
    • Bayard walks right into Redmond's law office, and Redmond shoots at him twice, but misses. Then John's murderer runs out of the building and jumps on a southbound train. We can pretty much guess he's never coming back.
    • The whole gang charges in and figures out that Bayard walked in unarmed and was shot at, which seems to be a strange thing to do but acceptably brave enough to count as trying to avenge his father's death.
    • Bayard heads back home with Ringo. Before getting there, Bayard falls asleep down by the creek. He wakes up crying, and Ringo washes his face with creek water.
    • He goes back up to the house, where Aunt Jenny tells him that Drusilla has gone to Denny's house in Alabama. He sits down next to his aunt and she cries, cursing the Sartorises.
    • Bayard goes to his room and imagines that Drusilla is still there because the house still smells like verbena, the flower she liked.
    • That's quite a family.