Study Guide

Thirteen Reasons Why Quotes

  • Respect and Reputation

    Chapter 3

    <em>The truth.</em> (3.212-13)

    At first, Hannah's tapes seem like a way for her to clear her reputation, but in many of the later stories she makes some unpleasant confessions. This helps us see that Hannah isn't interested in people thinking she was some kind of angel. She wants to set the record straight by telling the truth as she sees it.

    I know what you are all thinking. Hannah Baker is a slut. (3.151)

    I've heard so many stories I don't know which one is the most popular. But I do know which is the least popular.

    The truth. (3.212-13)

    At first, Hannah's tapes seem like a way for her to clear her reputation, but in many of the later stories she makes some unpleasant confessions. This helps us see that Hannah isn't interested in people thinking she was some kind of angel. She wants to set the record straight by telling the truth as she sees it.

    <em>But eventually, as they always will, the rumors reached me. And everybody knows you can't disprove a rumor. </em>(3.222)

    Is Hannah's attitude too defeatist? Is there a way she could have challenged the rumors about her or put a stop to them?

    Clay Jensen

    "And she was new to the school, so the rumors overshadowed everything else I knew about her." (3.218)

    Clay suggests that rumors stuck to Hannah because she was the new kid. But Clay has known Skye since at least middle school, and he apparently believes rumors about her, too.

    Chapter 5
    Hannah Baker

    <em>For Jessica, it was easier to think of me as Bad Hannah than as the Hannah she got to know at Monet's. It was easier to accept. Easier to understand.</em>

    <em>For her, the rumors needed to be true.</em> (5.117-18)

    The rumors about Hannah affect her relationships with both guys and girls. Girls like Jessica can use Hannah as an excuse when their relationships don't work out.

    Chapter 6
    Hannah Baker

    <em>So who were you? I saw your height and your hair, but I couldn't see your face clearly enough. </em>

    <em>Still, you gave yourself up, Tyler.</em>

    <em>And for some reason, telling me you were nowhere made your eyes twitch and your forehead break into a sweat. </em>(6.210-11, 213)

    Other than the fact that Tyler is a photographer, his nervous response to her questioning is all the evidence Hannah has that he is the Peeping Tom. Do you think she's justified in accusing him on the tapes without having more proof?

    Chapter 8

    With every side of every tape, an old memory gets turned upside down. A reputation twists into something I don't recognize. (8.146)

    Hannah's tapes change the way Clay looks at all sorts of things: reputations no longer matter.

    Chapter 11
    Hannah Baker

    <em>Clay, your reputation was deserved. But mine… mine was not. And there I was with you. Adding to my reputation. </em>(11.237)

    Hannah is trying to explain why she turned away from Clay the night of the party. There seem to be two reasons: (1) she fears that Clay will think she's a "slut" if she goes any farther with him, and (2) she's afraid the love she shows him will turn into an ugly rumor or bad joke, like it did with Justin.

    Chapter 17
    Clay Jensen

    But no matter when I go back, the fact remains, eventually I need to face the other people on the tapes. (17.1)

    What do you think Clay means by this? Does he want to hear the other side of the story from the people on Hannah's list? Or does he want to confront them about how he treated Hannah? Or is it something completely different?

  • Love

    Chapter 3
    Hannah Baker

    <em>So thank you, Justin. Sincerely. My very first kiss was wonderful. And for the month or so that we lasted, and everywhere that we went, the kisses were wonderful. You were wonderful.</em> (3.221)

    Justin crushes every romantic idea that Hannah ever had about love. Even her dreams tell her that Justin is the one for her. But there's a big difference between fantasy Justin and the real Justin she will get to know over the next couple years.

    I hardly knew Hannah Baker. I mean, I wanted to. I wanted to know her more than I had the chance. […] [W]e never had the chance to get closer. And not once did I take her for granted. Not once. (3.36)

    Really, Clay? Not even once? Even Clay realizes he might be a bit off on this. He could have used all those nights at the movie theater to get closer to her, but her reputation scared him off. Until now, poor Clay hasn't had enough information to fully understand or analyze his relationship with Hannah.

    Chapter 8
    Hannah Baker

    <em>As I filled mine out, I found myself describing a certain someone at our school.</em> (8.26)

    We're pretty sure Hannah is talking about Clay here – don't you think?

    For just a buck, you get the name and number of your one true soul mate. For five bucks, you get your top five. (8.3)

    As we discuss in "Symbols, Imagery, and Allegory," the Oh My Dollar Valentines become a symbol of how everything love-related in Hannah's life turns to pain and shame. What was meant to be a chance to meet her soul mate turns out into a nightmare when her date assaults her.

    If I had been smart, if I had been honest with my survey, I would have described Hannah. And maybe we would have talked. Seriously talked. (8.59)

    Oh, the bitter irony. If Clay had described Hannah in his survey, they probably would have ended up on one another's lists. While Hannah takes the game a bit <em>too</em> seriously, Clay doesn't take it quite seriously enough.

    Chapter 10

    That truth first came to light a few weeks ago, at a party, with Hannah directly in front of me. An amazing moment when everything seemed to be falling into place. (10.58)

    Finally Clay and Hannah meet. They talk, they connect, they kiss. But Hannah is reminded of Justin's betrayal and the rumors, and she pushes Clay away. From that moment on she is lost to him, even though he keeps smiling at her in the hall and trying to catch her eye.

    But now it's too late.

    And that's why at this moment I feel so much hate. Toward myself. I deserve to be on this list. Because if I hadn't been so afraid of everyone else, I might have told Hannah that someone cared. (10.761-62)

    Clay doesn't just lament the loss of what could have been a really good romantic relationship. He's also lost the chance to be Hannah's friend, and probably to save her life.

    Chapter 11
    Hannah Baker

    <em>Romeo, oh Romeo. Wherefore art though, Romeo. </em>(11.46)

    How mushy. Hannah starts Clay's tape with these words, making it pretty clear that she was in love with him. While this provides a tiny bit of relief for Clay's guilt, it probably makes his loss of Hannah and the chance to save her even more painful.

    Chapter 17
    Clay Jensen

    Two steps behind her, I say her name.

    "Skye." (17.48-49)

    Clay is doing the loving thing here both for himself and for Skye. By reaching out to her, he takes a stand against all the ugly things he's heard in Hannah's tapes.

  • Death

    Chapter 3

    <em>No return engagements. No encore. And this time, absolutely no requests.</em>

    No, I can't believe it. Hannah Baker killed herself. (3.3-4)

    Hannah obviously records the tapes before she dies, but it feels like she's a vengeful ghost speaking to her listeners from the beyond.

    Chapter 8

    I'm listening to someone give up. Someone I knew. Someone I liked.

    I'm listening but I'm still too late. (8.281-82)

    Death colors everything in this story, but it's most prominent in the later sections, as Hannah becomes more and more sure of her decision to take her own life.

    Chapter 9
    Hannah Baker

    <em>I needed a change, just like they said, so I changed my appearance. The only thing I still had control over. </em>(9.137)

    The novel points to a change in appearance as a big sign that someone is at risk for suicide. "But," you might be thinking, "people change their appearance all the time! Just look at Lady Gaga." We were thinking the same thing. Perhaps it has to do with the meaning of this change: is it just for fun, or is it a cry for attention?

    <em>I wrote a note to Mrs. Bradley that read: "Suicide. It's something I've been thinking about. Not too seriously, but I have been thinking about it." </em>(9.201)

    Hannah doesn't blame Mrs. Bradley, her Peer Communications teacher, but Shmoop thinks she let Hannah down. She had a responsibility to try to find out who wrote the note. Agree or disagree?

    <em>"It's like whoever wrote this note just wants attention. If they were serious, they would have told us who they were." </em>(9.222)

    The insensitivity to suicide in Hannah's Peer Communications class makes it even harder for her to talk about. It also confirms her growing belief that everybody in her life will eventually let her down.

    Chapter 12

    No one knew who caused it. Not us. Not the police.

    But Jenny knew. And Hannah. And maybe Jenny's parents, because someone fixed her bumper real fast. (12.161-162)

    Jenny and Hannah are involved in an accident that likely caused the death of another high school student. Hannah's guilt over this premature death is a factor in her decision to speed up her own.

    Chapter 13

    I summarize a bullet point from the handout at school. "Giving away possessions." (13.19)

    Hannah gives Tony her bike the night before she takes her own life. He blames himself for not recognizing that this, along with her tears, was a sign of her suicidal state. Might this act have been a cry for help? Maybe Hannah thought that if she gave Tony her bike, he'd figure out what she was going to do and try to stop her.

    Chapter 14
    Hannah Baker

    <em>I wish I would die.

    </em>I've thought those words many times. But it's a hard thing to say out loud. It's even scarier to feel you might mean it. (14.10-11)

    Clay admits that even he has had suicidal or near-suicidal feelings. This comes as a surprise and makes us want to hear more of his story. Luckily, Clay doesn't seem at risk for suicide. If anything, Hannah's death makes him appreciate life even more.

    You took pills. That, we all know. Some say you passed out and drowned in a bathtub full of water. (14.18)

    Here's a good example of that second person point of view we talk about in our section on "Narrative Technique." In that section, we focus on Hannah's use of the second person, but Clay uses it, too – to address Hannah. Here he's telling her all the rumors about the way she died. This is a grim but somehow tender point in the story.

  • Betrayal

    Chapter 3

    <em>Betrayal. It's one of the worst feelings. </em>(3.63)

    Hannah announces this theme early in the novel when she describes how Justin Foley used her first kiss to start the rumor that turned her life into a nightmare.

    Hannah Baker

    <em>A rumor based on a kiss ruined a memory that I hoped would be special. A rumor based on a kiss started a reputation that people believed in and reacted to. </em>(3.224)

    Hannah takes Justin's betrayal so seriously because it affects her life in real ways. Guys think they can touch her without permission, and girls think she's stealing their boyfriends. This betrayal contributes a great deal to her isolation.

    Chapter 7
    Hannah Baker

    It turns out you were just grooming me to be a total mark under People Who Think Courtney Crimson Is a Really Neat Girl. Another guaranteed vote for Most Liked in the senior yearbook. (7.29)

    Talk about bitter. Hannah could live with the fact that Courtney doesn't genuinely want to be her friend. She could even live with Courtney using her for a ride to a party and then ditching her. The real betrayal is that Courtney spreads a rumor that Hannah has erotic toys in her bedroom drawer. Once again, it's all about the rumors.

    Chapter 9
    Hannah Baker

    <em>No one insisted on knowing those topics. But for some reason, they refused to have a discussion on suicide without specifics. </em>(9.225)

    Hannah feels betrayed by her classmates when they ridicule the anonymous note she leaves about feeling suicidal. In "Why Should I Care?" we suggest that this book is effective in doing what wasn't done in Hannah's class, starting a much-needed conversation about suicide and how to prevent it.

    <em>It might not seem like a big deal to you, Zach. But now, I hope you understand. I needed those notes. I needed any hope those notes might have offered. </em>(9.155)

    Zach steals Hannah's notes in her Peer Communications class because he feels like Hannah has snubbed him. At least, that's what she thinks his motivation was. Even though Zach and Hannah aren't close, she trusts him enough to feel betrayed when she catches him acting so cruelly.

    Chapter 10
    Hannah Baker

    <em>It was never a lost poem, Ryan. And you never found it, so it did not belong in your collection. </em>(10.153)

    Take that, Ryan. Ryan Shaver betrays Hannah by stealing a very private poem and publishing it in the school paper, presenting it as something he found lying around. This betrayal hurts badly because Hannah has to listen to the whole school analyze and make fun of her poem. She trusted Ryan and thought he was a potential friend, somebody who understood what she was going through – boy was she mistaken.

    Chapter 12
    Hannah Baker

    <em>That girl had two chances. And both of us let her down.</em> (12.88)

    Hannah is just as guilty of betrayal as anyone else, even in the most serious situations (like Bryce's alleged rape of Jessica).

    Chapter 14

    That's why you did it. You wanted your world to collapse around you. You wanted everything to get as dark as possible. And Bryce, you knew, could help you do that. (14.84)

    Hannah betrays herself by having sex with Bryce. Hannah knows it and Clay knows it.

    Chapter 15
    Hannah Baker

    <em>He's letting me go. </em>(15.204)

    Mr. Porter betrays Hannah by not stopping her from leaving the school after she comes to him for help. You can read more about that in his "Character Analysis."

  • Guilt and Blame

    Chapter 3
    Hannah Baker

    <em>I know what you're thinking. As I was telling the story, I was thinking the same thing. A kiss? A rumor based on a kiss made you do this to yourself? </em>(3.223)

    Hannah pretty much reads our minds here. At the beginning of the story, it's hard not to read a little defensively. We have a hard time listening to people who can only blame others for their problems. But as we hear Hannah out, we come to understand why Justin's betrayal is such a big deal to her.

    <em>I hope you're ready, because I'm about to tell you the story of my life. More specifically, why my life ended. And if you're listening to these tapes, you're one of the reasons why.</em>

    What? No! (3.5-6)

    Hannah's story begins with this harsh accusation. It really does a number on Clay, who is sure he did nothing about which he should feel guilty.

    Chapter 4

    Alex's list was a joke. A bad one, true. But he had no idea it would affect her like this. This isn't fair. (4.48)

    Alex admits to Clay that there's no truth behind the rumor that he and Hannah were involved sexually or romantically. We aren't proud of Alex and his list, but we don't see it as unforgiveable. Maybe the point is that there's a general lack of communication going on here, and it's showing in the characters' relationships.

    Hannah Baker

    <em>Every single event documented here may never have happened had you, Alex, not written my name on that list. It's that simple. </em>(4.45)

    Even Clay admits that Hannah isn't being reasonable here. Yes, Alex's list had a serious effect on her. But her insistence that the list is responsible for everything that happened afterward conveys the desperation and confusion she's feeling as she records her story.

    Chapter 6

    Tyler, wherever you are, I am so sorry. You deserve this, but I'm sorry. (6.209)

    There isn't really enough evidence to convince us that Tyler is the Peeping Tom. If he is, do you agree with Clay that he deserves to be on the tapes? Why or why not?

    Chapter 7
    Marcus Cooley

    "What makes us so different from him?"

    "Nothing. It's ridiculous [. . . ]. I don't belong on those tapes. Hannah just wanted an excuse to kill herself." (7.180-84)

    That's some interesting logic, Marcus. Clay wants to know why Tyler is being singled out, getting rocks thrown at his window, when everybody on the tapes is guilty. Marcus, on the other hand, is making a scapegoat out of Tyler; placing the blame on him when really Marcus himself is just as guilty.

    Chapter 9
    Hannah Baker

    <em>I guess that's the point of it all. No one knows for certain how much impact they have on the lives of other people. Oftentimes, we have no clue. Yet we push it just the same. </em>(9.68)

    Hannah suggests that she wants the people on the tapes to feel guilty so they'll think twice before hurting someone again. Do you think this will work?

    This isn't fair. If Zach had any idea what Hannah was going though, I'm sure he wouldn't have stolen her notes.<em> </em>(9.167)

    Thanks, Clay. Here we see why Clay's point of view is so important to the story. He provides more objectivity than Hannah, critically analyzing her words instead of accepting them blindly.

    Chapter 11
    Hannah Baker

    <em>Clay, honey, your name does not belong on this list. </em>(11.75)

    Whew. Clay breathes a big fat sigh of relief when he hears these words. The problem is, he's starting to think he <em>is</em> guilty. He let the rumors about Hannah stand in the way of his feelings for her. He realizes how much she cared for him and how much of a difference his love could have made in her life.

    <em>Think about it. He raped a girl and would leave town in a second if he knew… well… if he knew that we knew. </em>(11.91)

    Hannah's decision not to reveal Bryce's name is really confusing. Other than Mr. Porter, everybody else on the list will probably figure out, like Clay does, that she's talking about Bryce. So why not just say his name? And what about her threat to release the tapes if they aren't passed on? Since Bryce isn't named in the part about the rape, what's to keep him playing the game?

    Chapter 13
    Tony

    "We're all to blame," [Tony] says. "At least a little." (13.10)

    Just a little word of wisdom from Tony, the guy in charge of making sure that Hannah's last wishes are carried out. Do you think Tony is onto something here, or do you disagree?

    Chapter 14
    Hannah Baker

    <em>No matter what I've said so far, no matter who I've spoken of, it all comes back to – it all ends with – me. </em>(14.4)

    Hannah blames herself here. She doesn't try to minimize the guilt of the other characters, but she seems to be suggesting that everything is intricately intertwined.

  • Sex

    Chapter 3

    Then later I heard about her getting felt up at the rocket slide. And she was so new to school that the rumors overshadowed everything else I knew about her. (3.218)

    The rumors of Hannah's sexual promiscuity are so widespread that even good ol' Clay uses them to define her.

    Hannah was beyond me, I figured. Too experienced to even think about me. (3.219)

    Clay isn't just afraid to approach Hannah because of what people will say. He's also intimidated by her image as someone more sexually experienced than him.

    Hannah Baker

    <em>Hannah Baker is not, and never was, a slut. Which begs the question. What have you heard? </em>(3.158)

    The theme of sex is tied up with the theme of respect and reputation. Hannah's reputation makes her hypersensitive about sex and what people think about her. The rumors rob her of her privacy and the freedom to explore sexuality at her own pace. Of course, Hannah contributes to the problem by letting the rumors control her. She feels powerless to defeat them or to change how they affect her.

    <em>You wanted something sexier, didn't you? You wanted to hear how my itchy little fingers started playing with his zipper. You wanted to hear… </em>(3.212)

    Hannah's fury comes through loud and clear in this passage. The rumors that she and Justin did more than kiss were spread over two years ago, but they clearly remained fresh in Hannah's mind.

    Chapter 7
    Hannah Baker

    <em>Ready for this, everyone? Our sweet little Miss Crimson told this guy, and whoever else was standing within earshot, that I've got a few little surprises buried in my dresser drawers. </em>(7.232)

    Now other <em>girls</em> are spreading rumors about Hannah's sex life. For some reason everyone wants to be all up in her business that way. Courtney's lie reminds us of every teen movie ever made. Unfortunately, this time, things turn out much differently.

    Chapter 11
    Hannah Baker

    <em>His arm cradling my head like a pillow. Both of my arms hugging him, trying to pull him closer. And speaking for myself, I wanted more. </em>(11.224)

    <em>And then I remembered how you ruined it.

    "Stop," I told Clay. And my hands stopped pulling him in. </em>(11.229-230)

    Hannah wants to be with Clay because she cares for him and thinks he cares for her. She doesn't necessarily want to have sex with him, but she does want to enjoy what she's feeling. But her still-fresh memories of Justin and the pain he caused her make this seem impossible.

    Chapter 14
    Hannah Baker

    <em>You were touching me… but I was using you. I needed you, so I could let go of me completely. </em>(14.133)

    Why did Hannah have sex with Bryce? Clay thinks it's because she knew it would be another reason to kill herself – just one more step toward self-destruction.

    <em>For everyone listening, let me be clear. I did not say no or push his hand away. All I did was turn my head, clench my teeth, and fight back tears. And he saw that. He even told me to relax. </em>(14.134)

    Why does Hannah tell her listeners that she didn't resist Bryce's advances? Is she trying to let Bryce off the hook? Or is she trying to show them how terrible an experience it was for her?

    Again, nice guy that he was, he didn't take advantage of the situation. He wanted to. He tried for the longest time to get a reaction out of her. […]

    It dawned on him – finally – that she wasn't in a romantic mood and probably wouldn't be for a while. (12.29-30)

    Unlike Bryce, Justin realizes that sex needs to be consensual – both people involved have to want it.

  • Choices

    Chapter 3

    Why would you want to mail out a bunch of tapes blaming you in a suicide? You wouldn't. But Hannah wants us, those of us on the list, to hear what she has to say. And we'll do what she says if only to keep them away from the people not on the list. (3.69)

    Clay is afraid he's being manipulated by Hannah, especially during the early tapes. It's important to him that his decision to listen be his own.

    Chapter 4

    It always makes me want to grab him by the shirt and push him until he lets the girl go.

    But instead, every time, I pretend not to notice.

    What could I do anyway? (4.25-27)

    Although his name hasn't yet been revealed, Clay is talking about Bryce Walker, whose bullying he feels powerless to stop. Do you think he still feels this way after he hears Hannah's tapes? What will he do the next time he sees Bryce hurting someone?

    Chapter 7

    This is not obsession. It's respect. I'm living out her last requests. (7.47)

    Clay continues to wrestle with his motivation for listening to Hannah's tapes and following her map. Here he's afraid of developing an unhealthy fixation on her and her death.

    Chapter 8
    Hannah Baker

    <em>But now? The survey. For Valentine's Day. Was this just another chance to get thrown off the road? </em>(8.55)

    Hannah has a really hard time trusting life enough to submit her Valentine's Day survey and get her list of potential soul mates. Because Clay chooses to treat the survey as a joke, he isn't on her list. She accepts a date with Marcus Cooley, and we know how that turns out. Can we blame Hannah for accepting the date? Probably not: sometimes we don't know if we can trust someone right away. Still, Hannah takes things personally and starts to seriously doubt whether she's capable of making good choices.

    <em>I wanted people to trust me, despite anything they'd heard. [. . . ] And if I wanted people to treat me that way, then I had to do the same for them, right? </em>(8.165)

    Hannah is trying to rise above her trust issues and the rumors, but the guy she experiments with, Marcus Cooley, turns out to be a total jerk. It's just more proof that Hannah can't find a trustworthy soul anywhere.

    Chapter 12
    Hannah Baker

    <em>I couldn't believe it. And your friend couldn't believe it either, because when he grabbed the doorknob again, he didn't rush right in. He waited for you to protest. </em>(12.60)

    Justin's choice to let Bryce into the room to have sex with a passed-out Jessica is an awful moment for Hannah. She knows it's Justin's fault, but her own decision not to intervene makes her feel like she's no better than him.

    Chapter 13
    Hannah Baker

    "<em>Nobody obeys Stop signs anyway. They just roll on through. So now, because there isn't one, it's legal. See, people will thank me.</em>"<em> </em>(13.134)

    We're not seeing your logic here, Jenny. Jenny's decisions to drive drunk and not report the fallen stop sign seemingly cause the death of another student. Hannah's role in this torments her and leaves her even more convinced that all her choices turn out wrong.

    Chapter 14
    Hannah Baker

    <em>Tomorrow, I'm getting up, I'm getting dressed, and I'm walking to the post office. There, I'll mail a bunch of tapes to Justin Foley. And after that, there's no turning back. </em>(14.34)

    Hannah is set on her decision to end her life. She knows that mailing the tapes to Justin will help her stick to this decision. What do you think: was there really no turning back?

    Chapter 17

    Skye's footsteps are growing louder now. And the closer I get to her, the faster I walk, and the lighter I feel. My throat begins to relax. (17.47)

    Now <em>this </em>is a good choice. We're sure of it. Reconnecting with his middle school crush, who might be at risk for suicide herself, shows how much Clay has grown from listening to Hannah's story. He <em>does</em> have a choice, and he makes the right one.

  • Violence

    Chapter 4

    I know who Hannah's talking about now. I've seen his wrist-grabbing stunt before. (4.25)

    This is the first time Bryce Walker shows up, though his name isn't revealed until later. Bryce is the character most associated with violence in the novel.

    Hannah Baker

    <em>Statement number one: "I'm only playing, Hannah." </em>

    <em>Translation: Your ass is my play-toy. You might think you have final say over what happens to your ass, but you don't. Not as long as "I'm only playing." </em>(4.133-34)

    What a jerk. Seriously, Bryce: get a clue. Hannah's dislike of Bryce's violent attitude makes makes it all the more mind-boggling when she chooses to have sex with him toward the end of the book.

    Chapter 5
    Hannah Baker

    <em>That tiny scar you've all seen above my eyebrow, that's the shape of Jessica's fingernail… which I plucked out myself</em>. (5.130)

    Jessica inflicts physical violence on Hannah at Monet's Café. But the physical violence doesn't hurt as much as the emotional trauma that comes along with it. Check out "Symbols" for more on that.

    Chapter 6
    Hannah Baker

    <em>And even though he was outside, I was too afraid of what might happen if he saw me reaching for the phone. </em>(6.123)

    Is the Peeping Tom committing violence toward Hannah? He terrifies her and makes her feel unsafe in her own home; does this count as violence?

    Chapter 7
    Hannah Baker

    <em>Watching those guys pummel each other so no one would suspect them of being weak was too much for me. Their reputations were more important than their faces. </em>(7.206)

    Ah, machismo. At the first party Hannah describes, she sees a fist fight that makes her physically ill. She is very sensitive to violence and is starting to see more and more of it.

    My fingers close and tighten into a fist. I look down at the rock, aching to pick it up. (7.188)

    Clay is normally the nonviolent type, but when he sees Marcus throwing rocks at Tyler's window, it brings out his aggressive side. Why is he so miffed?

    Chapter 8
    Hannah Baker

    <em>Below the table, my fingers were fighting to pry your fingers off. To loosen your grip. To push you away. And I didn't want to yell – it wasn't to that level yet – but my eyes were begging for help.</em> (8.243)

    Hannah describes how Marcus Cooley sexually assaults her in a booth at Rosie's. This violent incident marks a turning point for Hannah. After this, her thoughts of suicide increase drastically.

    About halfway through the movie, while I sold tickets for the next show, that girl came tearing out of the theater holding her wrist. Maybe crying. Bryce was nowhere to be seen. (8.280)

    Bryce is at it again – treating women like objects. Clay lets us know that Bryce doesn't limit his violence to girls, though. He uses violence to get what he wants from just about everyone.

    Chapter 12
    Hannah Baker

    <em>A few minutes was all he needed with her. So just relax and step aside. </em>(12.56)

    Creepy. The fact that Bryce always tells his victims to "just relax" almost makes his violence stand out even more. Relaxation and violence usually don't go hand in hand, eh?