Study Guide

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader Summary

Unpleasant, know-it-all bully Eustace Scrubb is transported, along with his cousins Edmund and Lucy Pevensie, to the magical world of Narnia through a painting of a ship. Swallowed up by the picture, the three children find themselves falling into the water beside the Dawn Treader, a sailing ship built by King Caspian of Narnia for the purpose of traveling east to find seven missing lords exiled by his evil Uncle Miraz. Caspian is also searching for the eastern edge of the world (Narnia is apparently flat) and has brought with him Reepicheep the Talking Mouse, who, according to a prophecy, will find what he seeks in the "utter East."

Edmund and Lucy, who are also Narnian royalty, greet their old friend King Caspian. All three children become members of the ship's company, although Eustace does so with bad grace. Eustace clashes with Reepicheep, attempting to use his greater size to tease and torment the mouse. However, Reepicheep's ferocity and honor eventually make it clear to Eustace that he'll have to stop if he doesn't want to find himself in a swordfight.

The Dawn Treader arrives at the three Lone Islands, Felimath, Doorn, and Avra. When they go ashore on their own for a walk, Eustace, Lucy, Edmund, Caspian, and Reepicheep are captured by slave traders. Caspian is sold to a local nobleman who turns out to be Lord Bern, one of the seven missing lords. With Lord Bern's help, Caspian overthrows the corrupt Governor Gumpas, abolishes the slave trade in the Lone Islands, and rescues his friends. The Dawn Treader's crew restocks and refurbishes the ship. Caspian makes Bern a Duke and installs him as the new ruler of the Lone Islands, under Narnian dominion. (Found Lord Count: One!)

When the Dawn Treader sets sail again, it's caught up in a violent storm that destroys the mast and practically totals the ship. After several days on low water rations, they land at what appears to be a deserted island to make repairs. While the others are working, Eustace sneaks away to rest and gets lost among foggy hills. Finding himself in a strange valley, he witnesses a dragon die from old age. After making sure the dragon is dead, Eustace ventures into its cave, where his greed is awakened by the sight of a massive amount of treasure. Eustace puts on a gold bracelet and falls asleep lying on a pile of gold coins. When he wakes up he is shocked to discover that he himself has turned into a dragon, with the gold bracelet digging painfully into his now-enormous and scaly arm. Eustace returns to his shipmates and manages to communicate what has happened to him. As a dragon, he is able to help hunt for food and uproot trees for rebuilding the ship.

When the Dawn Treader is nearly ready to leave, Eustace has a mysterious, miraculous encounter with the great lion, Aslan, who turns him back into a human boy by peeling layers of scaly skin off of him and tossing him into a pool of healing water. Eustace rejoins his shipmates a much more pleasant and helpful person. Examining the bracelet that Eustace was wearing, Caspian realizes that it belonged to one of the seven missing lords, Octesian, who must have been killed by the previous dragon or transformed into one the way Eustace was. (Found Lord Count: Two!)

After setting sail again, the Dawn Treader is attacked by a sea serpent that tries to encircle the ship in a coil of its snakelike body and squeeze it to pieces. Thanks to the bravery of Reepicheep and Eustace and the efforts of everyone on board, the sea serpent is pushed off the end of the ship, and the tightening loop of its body crashes harmlessly into the sea.

The next island the Dawn Treader lands at appears to be uninhabited. Caspian, Edmund, Eustace, Lucy, and Reepicheep go for a hike and discover a pool of water in a valley. When they sit down to rest beside the pool, they discover the belongings of one of the missing Narnian lords, including his sword and chain mail shirt (a "chain mail shirt" is one of those metal shirts made out of chains that medieval knights and Frodo Baggins wear). They notice a golden statue of a man at the bottom of the pool, and when Edmund tries to measure the depth of the water with his spear, it turns to gold, too. They realize that the water of this pool and spring turns everything to gold. At first Caspian and Edmund become greedy and cruel as they imagine the power this water could bring them, but when Aslan appears briefly on a nearby hillside, they come to their senses. They return to the ship with only a fuzzy memory of their experience, although they remember that they found one of the missing lords (they don't yet know which one). (Found Lord Count: Three!)

Next the Dawn Treader lands on an island where no people are visible, but there are clear signs of civilization – short mowed lawns, a water pump, and a large two-story house. Lucy overhears some invisible people plotting to attack the Narnians on their way back to the shore. Strangely, instead of hearing footsteps when they move, Lucy hears large thumps and sees clouds of dust rise. She warns Caspian and the others, and they go down to the beach prepared for a fight. They are met by the invisible Duffers, a tribe of foolish people who agree with everything their equally foolish Chief says. The Chief explains that the island is ruled by a magician who made them ugly; in retaliation, they made themselves invisible. However, the magician has disappeared and they have grown tired of invisibility. Only a young girl can go upstairs in the magician's house and reverse the spell, and they insist that Lucy must do this or they will slaughter the Narnians. Lucy agrees. The Duffers feed them dinner and everyone rests for the night.

In the morning, Lucy goes upstairs in the magician's house, overcoming her fear of its creepy occult symbols and long-abandoned corridor. Reading the magician's book, she is tempted to use a spell to make herself beautiful. She resists when she sees Aslan's face appear on the page, but she succumbs to the temptation to use another spell to spy on her friends back home. Finally she finds and casts the anti-invisibility spell. Aslan becomes visible beside her and talks to her about eavesdropping. Then he introduces her to the magician Coriarkin, who has also been made visible.

Coriarkin feeds Lucy a meal of her favorite foods from back home in England and they talk about the Duffers. Lucy begins to realize that the magician is a kind and thoughtful ruler, and the Duffers are extremely foolish. Looking out the window, she sees that the now-visible Duffers are Monopods – one-footed dwarfs. She tries to explain to them that she doesn't find them ugly, but they won't listen.

Coriarkin tells Caspian that a ship with four lords on it stopped at his island several years ago. By comparing the lords Coriarkin met to the ones they have found so far, Caspian figures out that the man who was turned to gold was Lord Restimar. The Narnians and Dufflepuds, as the people come to call themselves, say goodbye and the Dawn Treader sails on.

Next the Dawn Treader encounters a strange cloud of darkness hovering over the water. Nobody really wants to sail into it, but Reepicheep accuses the men of being chicken, so they decide to take a look inside. The darkness is silent and creepy; the only things visible are lanterns hanging on the ship. The adventurers hear a man screaming in the distance and they bring him on board. He tells them to flee and explains that they are sailing toward the island where dreams come true – not daydreams or hopes, but actual dreams, including their worst nightmares.

That sounds pretty bad, and the crew can't navigate and seem to be going around in circles. Each person on the ship starts to hear noises they recognize from their worst dreams. Lucy calls on Aslan and a white albatross appears and leads the ship out of the black cloud. The man they have rescued introduces himself as Lord Rhoop, another of the exiled Narnian lords. He begs Caspian never to make him return to the Dark Island, but he has nothing to worry about – when they turn around, the darkness has disappeared as though it never existed. (Found Lord Count: Four!)

The Dawn Treader lands at a beautiful, hilly island. When they go ashore, Caspian and his friends discover a clearing surrounded by pillars, in the center of which is a long stone table covered in a delicious feast. At the table are the last three of the missing lords. They have fallen into an enchanted sleep, and their hair and beards have grown to cover the table in a tangled mass. Caspian, Lucy, Edmund, Eustace, and Reepicheep sit at the table all night, waiting to see what will happen.

Near dawn a beautiful blonde girl in a blue dress comes out of a door in the hillside. She greets them and welcomes them to Aslan's Table, asking why they aren't eating. They explain that they were concerned that the food had put the lords into an enchanted sleep, but she tells them the lords have never tasted it. Caspian asks how to break the spell, and the girl says her father will teach him.

At that moment her father, an old man with silver hair who seems to emit light, emerges from the hillside. His name is Ramandu. Ramandu and his daughter face the east and sing as the sun rises. A flock of birds flies out of the sun and consumes all the leftover food. Ramandu and his daughter explain that the lords argued about whether to sail further east, sail back home, or stay on the island, and when one of them touched the Stone Knife lying on the table they were enchanted. (It's the same stone knife that was used to kill Aslan in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.) To break the spell, they must sail as far east as possible and leave at least one person behind. Caspian agrees to do this, and with the help of Drinian and Rhince, he convinces all but one of the crew to come with him. (Found Lord Count: Seven!)

The Dawn Treader sets out to sail to the extreme eastern edge of the world. At one point, Lucy sees warlike Sea People in the water, but Drinian warns her not to tell the men about them so that the men aren't tempted to jump overboard. Reepicheep, feeling challenged by the warlike King of the Sea People, does leap into the ocean, but is quickly distracted by discovering that the water is fresh and sweet, not salty. This is a sign that the prophecy spoken over him when he was a baby is coming true. Everyone drinks the sweet water and feels extremely healthy.

As they get farther east, they get closer to the sun (remember, Narnia is flat) and everything gets almost unbearably bright, but drinking the water seems to help them withstand the light. The ship sails into a mass of white water lilies growing in all directions. Soon, they come to a place too shallow for the ship to continue. Caspian wants to go on with Reepicheep, but Aslan reminds him that it is his duty go to back and rule Narnia. Reepicheep, Edmund, Eustace, and Lucy set out in the boat, while the Dawn Treader sails back west toward Ramandu's island.

For three days, the four remaining adventurers journey east. Eventually their boat runs aground in a shallow area, and they find themselves looking at a wall of water 30 feet high flowing upwards. Behind it they believe they can see the enormous green mountains of Aslan's country. Reepicheep goes on toward the wall of water in his small coracle (a lightweight boat). He is borne upwards and disappears. For reasons they can't explain, the three children get out of the boat and wade south. Eventually they come to a rolling green plain where the sky comes down to meet the grass as a glassy blue wall. They meet a lamb who offers them a meal of roasted fish and then reveals himself to be Aslan. Aslan sends the children back to their own world, explaining that they must get to know him there under another name. He tells Edmund and Lucy that they will never return to Narnia but leaves open the possibility that Eustace might come back some day.

The narrator leaves us with two points: Caspian marries Ramandu's daughter and she becomes a great Narnian queen, and Eustace has permanently changed for the better.

  • Chapter 1

    The Picture in the Bedroom

    • We meet our "hero," a boy named Eustace Clarence Scrubb. He's so unpleasant that the narrator tells us he almost deserves this awful name.
    • Eustace's parents are extremely progressive – they have Eustace call them by their first names, they don't eat meat, drink alcohol, or smoke tobacco, and they love fresh air.
    • Eustace himself is pompous and unimaginative. He only likes books if they're nonfiction and he only likes animals if they're dead and classified as specimens.
    • Eustace's cousins are Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy, four siblings who have been to the magical land of Narnia twice before (in the books The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe and Prince Caspian). Eustace doesn't like them, but he does like bullying and teasing them.
    • One summer Edmund and Lucy come to stay with their Aunt Alberta and Uncle Harold, Eustace's parents. Their own parents have gone to America, taking their sister Susan with them, and their brother Peter is staying with Professor Kirke, a family friend (the same Professor who was in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe).
    • One day while they are staying at Eustace's house, Edmund and Lucy begin talking about their adventures in Narnia. They wonder when and how they will get to go back to that magical land.
    • As they talk, Edmund and Lucy look at a portrait of a sailing ship hanging on the wall of Lucy's bedroom. The ship is shaped to look like a dragon and painted green with a purple sail, and they think it looks Narnian in style.
    • Eustace, who has been eavesdropping, comes in and starts teasing Edmund and Lucy. Because he doesn't believe in Narnia, he thinks they're just playing a game.
    • Eustace starts composing a rude poem about Edmund and Lucy. Edmund is rude to Eustace and tries to make him go away.
    • Ignoring Edmund, Eustace starts an argument with Lucy about the picture. He asks if she likes it, and she says she does. He says it's a terrible picture and asks her to defend her opinion.
    • Lucy says she likes the picture because it seems so real – she can almost smell the ocean breeze and see the waves rolling and the ship moving on the water. Before Eustace can tell her she's wrong, he looks at the portrait and it does seem like the water is real.
    • As Eustace begins to feel slightly seasick, the world of the picture comes more and more to life. The ship is really moving, the waves are really splashing, and the sea breeze starts to blow through Lucy's bedroom.
    • Eustace thinks Edmund and Lucy are playing a practical joke on him and demands they stop.
    • All three of the children are suddenly hit by a cold splash of water coming out of the picture frame.
    • Eustace tries to smash the picture. Edmund tries to stop him. Lucy also grabs on to Eustace. All three of them are dragged toward the picture.
    • There is a confusion of sizes – either they have shrunk or the picture has grown – and they find themselves standing on the picture frame looking down into the sea. Eustace panics and grabs at Edmund and Lucy, and they all tumble down into the water.
    • As she hits the water, Lucy stays calm. She kicks off her shoes, keeps her mouth closed and her eyes open, and swims. Then Eustace clutches at her and they go under.
    • Lucy surfaces to find Edmund treading water and holding Eustace. The people on the ship are arranging to bring all three of them on board. Lucy sees a familiar face above her on the deck of the ship but doesn't recognize the person at first.
    • With Edmund's help, the familiar person ties ropes to Lucy and eventually she is hauled aboard. Next Edmund and then Eustace are hauled up, too.
    • As she reaches the deck of the ship, Lucy recognizes the familiar face – it's King Caspian of Narnia, whom she met in a previous adventure (described in the book Prince Caspian). Lucy, Edmund, and Caspian have a happy reunion.
    • Caspian is introduced to Eustace, who is crying and asking to go back. But there is nowhere he can go back to – the gateway to the "regular" world has disappeared, and there's no sign of the picture frame or Lucy's bedroom. In a combination of fear and seasickness, Eustace throws up.
    • Caspian orders spiced wine and Edmund, Lucy, and Eustace drink it. For Edmund and Lucy, it hits the spot. Eustace throws up again and cries and asks for "Plumptree's Vitaminised Nerve Food." We don't know exactly what that is, but think of a protein shake mixed with cough syrup and you'll probably get the idea. (Note: Shmoop does not recommend this as a cocktail recipe.)
    • Reepicheep, the two-foot-tall talking mouse that Lucy and Edmund met on their last visit to Narnia, appears. Eustace, thinking the Mouse is a performing animal, demands that he be taken away.
    • Reepicheep greets Edmund and Lucy and asks if Eustace is under their protection. Just when it looks like there might be a fight, Edmund and Lucy both sneeze, and Caspian arranges for all three children to go below and change into dry clothes.
    • Caspian gives his cabin on the ship to Lucy. Lucy adores the cabin, which is small and snug but richly decorated and has three windows looking out onto the water.
    • Lucy changes into some of Caspian's clothes; she has to go barefoot because none of his shoes will fit her. She feels excited about the sea voyage and thrilled to be back in Narnia.
  • Chapter 2

    On Board the Dawn Treader

    • Caspian introduces Lucy and Edmund to Lord Drinian, the captain of the Dawn Treader.
    • Edmund and Lucy compare their timeline with Caspian's. They figure out that one year has passed for Edmund and Lucy since they last saw Caspian, but for Caspian three years have passed since he became King.
    • In those three years, Caspian has solved most of Narnia's problems. He's established peace between the Talking Beasts, Telmarine men, and other creatures, and everything is so hunky-dory that he thought it was OK to leave for a while on a sea voyage. We just wish you could really turn a country around that fast!
    • Edmund asks Caspian the purpose of the voyage. Caspian explains that when he was a child, his Uncle Miraz, who had usurped the throne of Narnia, exiled seven lords who had been loyal to Caspian's father. As an excuse for sending them away, he told them to explore the Lone Islands and the Eastern Seas.
    • When Caspian was crowned King, he swore an oath to sail east for a year and a day to try to find seven missing lords, or at least figure out what happened to them. The lords were named Bern, Argoz, Revilian, Mavramorn, Octesian, Restimar, and Rhoop.
    • Caspian also says that, although his goal is to find the missing lords, Reepicheep has another one: to explore the eastern edge of the world. Nobody in Narnia knows what's beyond the Lone Islands, and Reepicheep thinks it might be Aslan's country.
    • Lucy's not sure that Aslan's country is the kind of place you could get to by normal modes of transportation – after all, if Aslan is a Christ figure (and we know he is), then his "country" is probably a metaphor for Heaven.
    • Reepicheep explains that when he was a child in his cradle, a Dryad spoke a prophetic verse over him. The verse describes Reepicheep traveling to the far east and finding everything he's looking for.
    • Nobody knows what to say after Reepicheep mentions his weird prophecy, so Lucy asks where the ship is now. The Captain, Lord Drinian, shows her their position on a chart and tells her about their adventures since leaving Narnia.
    • Drinian explains that they set sail from Cair Paravel, the capital of Narnia, about a month ago. After a day they put in at the port of Galma, where they stayed for a week so that Caspian could take part in a tournament. The Duke of Galma tried to get Caspian to marry his daughter, but Caspian wasn't interested.
    • Next they left Galma. After four days, in which there wasn't much wind and they had to row part of the way, they arrived at Terebinthia, but they couldn't stop there because Terebinthia was experiencing a disease epidemic.
    • They found a creek away from the plague-ridden city and got fresh water. After a few days, when the wind was right, they set sail for the Seven Islands. (Note: the Seven Islands are different from the Lone Islands.)
    • While sailing, they were threatened by pirates, but the pirates fled when they discovered the Narnians were well-armed.
    • Five days later, they arrived at Muil, the first of the Seven Islands. They hung out there for a while, feasting and building stores of supplies for the ship.
    • Six days before Edmund, Lucy, and Eustace arrived, the ship left the Seven Islands and headed for the Lone Islands. They should reach the first of the Lone Islands in two days. Nobody knows what lies after the Lone Islands.
    • Caspian suggests a tour of the ship, but Lucy is worried about Eustace. She finds out from Caspian that her magic flask of cordial is on board. (This is the gift Lucy received from Father Christmas in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe; now it's one of the treasures of Narnia.)
    • Lucy retrieves her flask of cordial from Caspian and they go to see Eustace.
    • The narrator describes the ship. To get to Eustace's cabin, they go down one of two hatches in the deck and walk across the benches that sailors sit at when they need to row the ship. They use the oars in bad weather or for making small turns in harbor, and everybody takes turns rowing.
    • Along the center of the hold there are stores of food. Other foods hang from the roof and some of the off-duty sailors are sleeping in their hammocks.
    • At one end of the hold, there's a door to a cabin. It's not as nice as Caspian's cabin (the one he gave to Lucy) – the walls of the ship slope together at the bottom, so the floor is narrow, and the windows are usually underwater.
    • Caspian tells Edmund that they will share this cabin with Eustace. Drinian wants to give the cabin that he shares with Rhince to the kings, but Caspian says the captain and first mate need to have a nicer cabin because they do more work.
    • Eustace is lying in a bunk in the cabin, green-faced and scowling. He asks if the storm is going to stop, and Drinian laughs – the weather is very nice.
    • Lucy gives Eustace a drop from her flask of magic cordial. In a few moments, his face looks less green and he appears better. He begins loudly complaining about everything, insisting that he should be taken ashore and saying he wants to see a British Consul.
    • Eventually they convince Eustace that they're sailing toward land and they don't have any way of sending him home. Eustace agrees to change his clothes and come out on deck.
    • Caspian gives Edmund, Lucy, and Eustace a tour of the ship. They see the lookout post on the forecastle (the part of the deck toward the front of the ship). They see the galley, which is the ship's kitchen.
    • Caspian also takes everyone up to the fighting top, which is the lookout post high up on the mast. The view from there is a bit scary.
    • Next Caspian takes them to see the poop, which is not what it sounds like. The poop is a room built on the deck at the back end of the ship, where the tiller – the steering wheel of the ship – is located.
    • We learn that the name of the ship is the Dawn Treader. (But you probably already figured that out.)
    • The narrator tells us that in the old days, when Edmund and Lucy were King and Queen in Narnia along with Peter and Susan, Narnia had a great seagoing tradition. However, Caspian's people were afraid of the sea, and the arts of shipbuilding and navigation were lost over the years. With the help of people from other countries, Caspian is rebuilding Narnia's naval forces, and the Dawn Treader is the best ship he's built so far.
    • The narrator admits that the Dawn Treader is pretty small, but beautiful and well-crafted. Eustace is extremely critical of the ship and compares it to motorboats and submarines back in his own world. Edmund and Lucy, however, love the ship and are excited about the coming adventures.
    • The next morning all three children get their own clothes back, dry. Eustace retrieves a small notebook and a pencil from his pocket and begins to keep a diary.
    • In his first entry Eustace records that he's been on the ship for 24 hours and still wonders if this might be a dream. He finds the ship frightening because it's so small and, in his opinion, primitive.
    • Eustace writes that he's been trying to tell Caspian all about the technological and social advances of his own world, but Caspian doesn't seem to understand or appreciate them.
    • He also writes about his irritation with Reepicheep, the talking mouse.
    • The narrator tells us that the next day, before dinner, Eustace came running into the dining area shouting that Reepicheep had half killed him.
    • Reepicheep comes in and apologizes for the scene, saying that if he'd known how Eustace would react, he would have waited until a better time to deal with him.
    • The narrator explains that Reepicheep has a habit of sitting on the farthest point forward of the ship that he can reach, which is on the neck of the dragon figurehead (remember, the whole ship is shaped like a dragon and painted to resemble one). He balances by waving his tail around and doesn't need to hold on to anything.
    • While Reepicheep was sitting on the figurehead, Eustace came up to the forecastle and saw his tail hanging down. He decided to grab the mouse by the tail, swing him around, and run away laughing.
    • Unfortunately for Eustace, Reepicheep managed to draw his sword and stab at Eustace's hand. After Eustace dropped him, Reepicheep continued to point the sword at Eustace and insisted that they duel.
    • Eustace protested that he didn't have a sword, doesn't know how to duel, and doesn't believe in fighting. Reepicheep gave him several lashings on the behind with his rapier.
    • This is the point at which Eustace ran into the dining area and started accusing Reepicheep of attacking him.
    • Everyone else on the ship takes the idea of a duel seriously. Caspian offers to lend Eustace a sword. Afraid of a fight, Eustace apologizes to Reepicheep, but not very gracefully.
  • Chapter 3

    The Lone Islands

    • One morning the Dawn Treader's lookout spies land. Lucy, Edmund, Caspian, Drinian, and Reepicheep gather on the forecastle. The land is Felimath, the first of the Lone Islands, and behind it they can see Doorn.
    • Lucy and Edmund remember these islands from voyages they took in their first visit to Narnia.
    • Caspian asks how and when the Lone Islands became Narnian territory. Edmund and Lucy don't know; it's just always been that way.
    • They debate where to land. Edmund and Lucy say that Felimath doesn't have any settlements and is just used for keeping sheep; people live on Doorn and the third island, Avra.
    • Caspian and Lucy are both eager to get off the ship and explore. They decide to get off the ship, take a nature hike across the island while the ship sails around it, then get back on the ship on the other side.
    • Eustace agrees to come with them because he's willing to do anything to get off the ship. He says that, where he comes from, boats are so big you can't even tell you're on them. Drinian says that in that case, it's pointless to go to sea.
    • In the end, Caspian, Reepicheep, Edmund, Lucy, and Eustace set out for Felimath. Some men row them to the beach in a small boat and leave them there.
    • At first their walk is pleasant. It's a beautiful day, the birds are singing, and the grass smells nice.
    • Soon they go over a small hill. On the other side, they have a view of the next two islands.
    • In the valley after the hill, a group of armed men are lying around resting. When Caspian sees them, he warns everyone not to tell them he's the King of Narnia – it might not be safe.
    • One of the men greets Caspian. Caspian asks if there is still a Governor of the Lone Islands, and the man says yes, Governor Gumpas.
    • The man invites Caspian and his friends to sit down and have a drink. They don't really want to, but they don't want to insult him by refusing, so they do.
    • While they're off their guard, the armed men attack and seize the Narnians. It turns out the leader is a slave merchant and they are now his captives!
    • The slave merchant is impressed by Reepicheep: Talking Beasts are rare in the Lone Islands. He tells them they will be taken to a slave market held tomorrow at the town of Narrowhaven, on the other island, Doorn.
    • The five Narnians are tied together and marched across the island. Reepicheep talks up a storm, but the slave merchant thinks he's just a trained pet and doesn't realize he's a sentient creature who knows what he's saying.
    • They arrive at the beach, where the slave merchant begins to load them onto his ship. Before they get far, however, a bearded man comes up and offers to buy Caspian.
    • The slave merchant, whose name is Pub, tries to haggle and chat with the man in a friendly way, but the man is obviously disgusted by him.
    • Lucy begs the man not to separate them, but as she's about to explain who Caspian is, she realizes he still wants to remain anonymous.
    • The man apologizes, saying he wishes he could buy them all. He pays 150 crescents (the local currency) for Caspian.
    • Lucy cries as Caspian is separated from the others, who are loaded into Pug's ship. Caspian reassures her that things will work out in the end.
    • Lucy, Edmund, Eustace, and Reepicheep are taken to the dirty hold of the slave ship, where they find many other unfortunate people captured by Pug.
    • Meanwhile, Caspian's new master leads him through a small village. Toward the end of their walk, he explains that he bought Caspian because his face looked familiar.
    • Caspian asks who he reminded the man of, and the man says he looks like his old master – King Caspian of Narnia.
    • Caspian reveals to the man that he is the son of the previous King Caspian. The man isn't sure whether to believe him. Caspian has three proofs of his identity: his family resemblance to his father, his guess that the man is one of the seven missing lords, and his skill in battle.
    • The man is convinced of Caspian's identity and goes down on one knee, paying homage to his King. We find out that the man is indeed one of the seven missing lords, Lord Bern.
    • Caspian asks Lord Bern about his past. It's pretty simple: Bern explains that he came to the Lone Islands with the other six lords, met and married a girl, and settled on the island.
    • Caspian asks Bern about Governor Gumpas. Bern explains that, in name, the Governor acknowledges the King of Narnia as his overlord, but in practice, he would probably be dangerous to Caspian.
    • Caspian suggests that they signal his ship and fight to rescue the prisoners. Bern suggests not; Caspian only has one ship, and Pug has several. Bern suggests that Caspian pretend that he has more men and ships at his disposal, intimidating Gumpas and Pug by a show of force.
    • Caspian signals to the Dawn Treader, and he and Bern go aboard and tell Drinian what's happened. Drinian wants to fight, but Bern continues to explain his plan.
    • Bern directs Caspian and Drinian to sail over to Doorn and put in at the harbor near his own estates. He also suggests that they hang out all their shields and banners to make the ship look impressive and warlike. They also send signals to an imaginary fleet, making anyone who's watching think they have many ships with them.
    • The Dawn Treader docks at Bernstead, which is, well, Lord Bern's homestead. (That one was pretty obvious!) They have a feast, and Bern makes some secret arrangements of his own for tomorrow.
  • Chapter 4

    What Caspian Did There

    • In the morning, Caspian, on Bern's instructions, orders all his men to suit up in full armor. They set out for Narrowhaven in a boat, flying the King's flag and taking a trumpeter with them.
    • When the boat lands, a crowd is assembled to meet them, as per Bern's secret commands the night before. All of Bern's friends have gathered and cheer as the King lands and marches into Narrowhaven with his retinue.
    • At first, only Bern's people are in the crowd, but over time the children join them in order to skip school. Then the old women watching from the town start gossiping. And then the young women come out to ogle the handsome men in flashy armor. Then all the young men come out to see what's going on, and eventually the whole town is cheering them on.
    • When Caspian reaches the gates of the castle, his trumpeter announces him. A lazy, badly dressed gatekeeper comes out of a small door and tries to tell them they can't see Governor Gumpas. Bern smacks him and tells him to take his helmet off before the king. The gatekeeper is confused, and Caspian's men go through the door and open the castle gate. Caspian and his followers march in.
    • In the courtyard Caspian discovers the castle guards lounging around drinking, only half-dressed in their armor and not at all ready for a fight. Before they can think, he reprimands them for their slovenly ways, but then forgives them and orders a cask of wine opened to celebrate his visit. They cheer – he's won their hearts with that cask.
    • While the guards drink, Caspian, Bern, and the men progress into Gumpas's main hall. They find Gumpas sitting behind a table covered in papers, ink, sealing wax, and other office supplies you need when you're a bureaucratic tyrant in charge of a few Narnian islands.
    • Gumpas tells the men that he doesn't see people without appointments except for one hour each month. In reply, Bern and Drinian overturn the document-covered table, drag Gumpas from his chair, and toss him to the ground. Caspian sits in Gumpas's chair and puts his sword across his knee.
    • Caspian tells Gumpas that he is the King of Narnia and has come to inspect the Governor's conduct as his official. His first point is that the Lone Islands haven't paid tribute to Narnia for 150 years.
    • Gumpas starts talking about council meetings and financial commissions to investigate, but Caspian says that if the tribute is not paid, the Governor must pay it out of his own personal fortune. Gumpas is alarmed and says Caspian must be joking.
    • Gumpas's mind reels. He wonders what he can do to get rid of Caspian and his men. He saw Caspian's ship, although he didn't know who it belonged to at the time, and he also saw it signaling to other ships. He assumes Caspian has a whole fleet at his command.
    • Caspian makes a second point: Gumpas has allowed the slave trade to flourish. Gumpas argues that slaves are an economic necessity. Caspian argues that, first, no they're not, and second, even if they were, slavery is wrong.
    • Gumpas says he can't take responsibility for stopping the slave trade, so Caspian relieves him of his office. In his place, Bern is appointed Duke of the Lone Islands. Caspian orders Gumpas and his men to clear the palace so that Bern can move in.
    • Next, Caspian orders horses, and he, Bern, and Drinian ride to the central marketplace of the town. They find Pug auctioning off slaves to the highest bidders, displaying their muscles and teeth to prospective buyers.
    • As Caspian and his men ride in, Bern orders everyone down on their knees before the king. Most people comply and the rest get pulled down by their neighbors.
    • Caspian pardons Pug for kidnapping him but declares that the slave trade is forbidden and that every slave in the market is free.
    • Everyone cheers. Caspian looks for his friends, finding Lucy, Edmund, and Reepicheep, who have already been sold.
    • Two merchants from Calormen approach Caspian and ask, politely and long-windedly, if they can have back the money they paid for his friends. Caspian orders Pug to pay back the money he received for all the slaves.
    • Caspian asks where Eustace is. Pug says that nobody would buy him, even when he was offered as a free bonus along with other slaves. Pug and his men have nicknamed Eustace "Sulky." "Sulky" is produced, and he's not even grateful to be rescued.
    • In the evening they have a feast. They spend the next several weeks preparing the ship for their further adventures, cleaning and repairing it and stocking up on supplies.
    • While they are in Narrowhaven, Caspian tries to find a sea captain who knows about the waters and lands to the east. Nobody really knows what's beyond the Lone Islands, although he hears more rumors about Aslan's country.
    • Bern can only tell Caspian that the other six lords continued to sail east. Sometimes he wishes he had gone on adventuring with them.
    • Bern asks Caspian to stay behind and help. He thinks that Calormen will declare war on the Lone Islands now that their supply of slaves has been stopped. Caspian says that he swore an oath to travel east – plus, he promised Reepicheep they would go!
  • Chapter 5

    The Storm and What Came of It

    • Three weeks after first coming to the Lone Islands, Caspian and his friends and crew prepare to leave and continue their expedition to the east. Everyone says goodbye to the Duke and a crowd of the Lone Islanders cheers as the ship leaves harbor.
    • A small tugboat pulls the Dawn Treader out to a place where the sails can catch the wind. The crowd falls silent as the tugboat disengages and returns to harbor. Drinian steers the ship to the east and everyone goes about their duties.
    • For several days Lucy really enjoys herself. In the morning she wakes up in a sunny cabin surrounded by all the new clothes she got in the Lone Islands. On deck the sea is beautiful and the air is warm.
    • Lucy often plays chess with Reepicheep. Usually Reepicheep is an intelligent player and wins, but every so often he makes a silly mistake because he imagines the pieces could be as brave and adventurous as he is.
    • Of course, the fun times can't last. One night a storm suddenly gathers in the western sky and hits the ship. The wind is crazy, the sea churns around, and it feels as though the ship will be swept under by the waves at any moment.
    • Lucy staggers and slips her way to the ladder and goes under the deck into her cabin. She knows she can't help by staying on deck because she's not an experienced sailor, so she gets out of the way.
    • Down below, Lucy can't see the men scrambling to keep the ship afloat in the storm, but she can still hear the noise of the ship straining under the wind and water.
    • The storm continues for several days. The whole time, three men are needed to steer the ship, someone always has to be pumping out the water that comes over the deck, and nobody gets much sleep. There's no hot food and no way to dry clothes or bedding. One man is swept overboard.
    • After the storm ends, Eustace writes in his diary. By his reckoning, it is September 3. He records that they have been in a hurricane for thirteen days, although everyone else says it was a bad storm for twelve.
    • Eustace complains about the lack of hot food and the ship's inability to signal for help. He also complains that Caspian and Edmund forced him to help everyone else work on deck on the night the mast was broken.
    • Now that the storm is over, Eustace writes that everyone is trying to decide what to do. They only have enough food to last for sixteen days and enough water to last for twelve. They've been sailing for eighteen days, so even if they turned around, the Lone Islands are out of reach.
    • At the moment, Eustace writes, there is no wind. Caspian doesn't want to force the men to row because of the water shortage. Everyone but Eustace voted to continue sailing east, hoping to find land. Eustace objected, but he didn't have any other plan to suggest.
    • Eustace's next entry is dated September 4. He complains that he got less food than everyone else at dinner. Lucy offered him some of her ration, but Edmund wouldn't let her give it up.
    • On September 5, Eustace writes that they are still becalmed and it's hot. He feels feverish.
    • On September 6, Eustace records that he woke up in the middle of the night feeling feverish and thirsty. He took his cup and snuck out of the cabin he shares with Caspian and Edmund, intending to get himself an extra ration of water. However, when he got to the cask of water, Reepicheep, who was guarding the water supply, caught him red-handed!
    • Reepicheep raised the alarm and everyone was horrified that Eustace was trying to steal water. Caspian forced Eustace to apologize, then announced that the next person caught trying to steal water would get two dozen lashes. Caspian expressed his sympathy for Eustace and assured him they were all feeling just as bad, but Eustace felt patronized. Eustace sulked in bed all day.
    • In the next entry, dated September 7, Eustace records that there was a little wind and the ship has been progressing east, using the bowsprit tied to the stump of the old mast as a makeshift mast.
    • On September 8, Eustace writes that he's staying in bed and only speaking to Lucy. Lucy is giving him some of her water ration.
    • On September 9, Eustace records that they've sighted land – a mountain to the southeast.
    • On September 10, Eustace writes that they are getting closer, but the mountain is still pretty far away.
    • Eustace's last entry for the time being is dated September 11. He writes that they dropped anchor in the early evening next to the island with the mountains, but Caspian wants to wait until morning to go ashore. The narrator tells us that, after this entry, Eustace forgot about his diary for a long time.
    • In the morning, the voyagers on the Dawn Treader wake up to find the ship in a bay encircled by cliffs. Ahead of the ship, a stream comes out of a grove of trees and flows into the bay. Past that are high mountains with waterfalls. The land is beautiful but silent and somehow oppressive.
    • Everyone goes ashore and drinks and bathes in the river. They eat and rest before beginning to repair and restock the ship. There's a lot to do: the ship is practically a wreck, and so are the people!
    • Eustace, lying under a tree, is dismayed to realize that everyone will have to keep working hard even after finding land. He decides to go for a walk and to not come back until the day's work is done.
    • Eustace casually strolls away from the rest of the ship's crew. Soon he finds himself hiking upward through the woods. The narrator notes that the old Eustace would never have put in the effort to hike up a steep mountainside, so the adventure has begun to change him.
    • Eventually Eustace reaches the top of the ridge. On one side, he can see the bay and the ocean beyond it. On the other side, he only sees clouds and fog hiding the center of the island. He settles down for a rest.
    • Soon Eustace feels lonely. He starts to worry about how much time might be passing and that the others might leave him behind. Panicked, he begins to scramble down the hillside, but he is turned around and confused by the fog and the different ridges.
    • Eustace reaches the bottom of the hill. As the fog clears, he finds himself in an unfamiliar valley. The sea and the bay are nowhere to be seen.
  • Chapter 6

    The Adventures of Eustace

    • While Eustace is discovering that he's lost, everyone else is back on the beach, washing up in the river and getting ready for dinner. They're preparing to feast on roast wild goat and wine. While everyone is eating a second helping, Edmund wonders aloud where Eustace is.
    • Meanwhile, in the unknown valley, Eustace notices burned, blackened patches of the landscape and a small pool nearby. It's completely silent – there are no birds or insects or animals around. (Cue the creepy music!)
    • Eustace realizes he came down the wrong side of the cliff and turns around to head back. But when he looks behind him, the fog has cleared and he can see just how steep, narrow, and dangerous the path is. He can't bring himself to go back up that way.
    • He starts to go get a drink from the pool, but then he hears a weird noise. He looks around for the source of the noise and sees a cave with two streams of smoke pouring out of it. He can hear something crawling around on the loose stones.
    • As the creature comes out of the cave, Eustace is horrified. He doesn't recognize it because he's never ready any fantasy books, but the narrator tells us that it's a dragon.
    • The dragon doesn't attack Eustace. Instead, it moves very slowly toward the pool. Eustace starts to realize that it's old and sad.
    • Before the dragon can drink from the pool, it keels over and dies.
    • Eustace waits for a long time, worried that the dragon is just playing dead to lure him over to it. Eventually he decides to check it out. He goes over and touches it – it's definitely dead.
    • Eustace feels relieved and elated. As he starts to drink from the pool, a thunderstorm suddenly breaks. The rain is heavy and hard, and Eustace is forced to take shelter in the dragon's cave.
    • Because he's never read anything about dragons, Eustace is surprised to discover that the cave is full of treasure. He finds himself lying on gold coins, rings, cups, plates, gems, and other precious things.
    • Eustace realizes that, with a fortune in treasure, he can live very well in the world of Narnia. He thinks about going to Calormen, the country that was buying the slaves from the Lone Islands.
    • Eustace starts to load himself up with as much treasure as he can carry. He fills his pockets with diamonds. He slides a large bracelet over his arm and pushes it above his elbow so it will stay on.
    • While Eustace waits for the rain to stop, he falls asleep.
    • Meanwhile, the others on the beach are calling for Eustace and starting to worry about him. Lucy speculates that he might be lost or hurt or killed. Rhince says good riddance, but Reepicheep reminds him that, as Queen Lucy and King Edmund's relative, Eustace is worthy of their protection. Caspian says they'll have to put together a search party.
    • Eustace is woken at night by a pain in his arm. He thinks the bracelet he put on his left arm has shrunk.
    • Eustace moves his right arm to feel his left, but in the moonlight he sees a dragon's claw moving on the right side of him. He realizes the dragon must have had a mate, which is now lying beside him. Two streams of smoke are pouring through the cave.
    • For a few moments Eustace is frozen with fear. He holds his breath and the smoke in the cave stops. When he starts breathing again, the smoke starts again.
    • Eustace starts to creep to the left but sees the dragon's other claw on that side too. He starts to cry, but his tears are strangely large and steamy.
    • As Eustace tries to creep out from between the two dragons, he sees their legs move whenever he moves his arms. He panics and bolts out of the cave, rushing toward the pool of water.
    • When he gets to the pool, Eustace notices two things. For some reason, he's been running on all fours. And when he looks at his reflection in the water, there's a dragon looking back at him.
    • Eustace realizes that he has been turned into a dragon while he slept. He was lying in a dragon's cave, on a dragon's hoard of treasure, thinking greedy dragonish thoughts, and so he became one. He now understands that the "two dragons" on either side of him were just his own dragon arms. His arm hurts because the bracelet he put on is now too small for his dragon foreleg and is biting deeply into his flesh.
    • For a moment, Eustace feels relieved. He has nothing to be afraid of – he is the monster!
    • But then he realizes that he wants to be a human being, to have friends and be around other people. He starts to cry.
    • After a while Eustace decides to go back to the beach and try to make Caspian and the others understand what has happened to him.
    • Eustace drinks from the pool and, without thinking, eats most of the dead dragon.
    • He starts to climb out of the valley, but then discovers that he has wings. He is thrilled to find himself flying over the mountains in the moonlight. He sees the Dawn Treader and begins diving toward it.
    • Lucy has fallen asleep after waiting to hear the report of the search party. They couldn't find Eustace but they did see the dead dragon in the valley.
    • Lucy is woken later in the night. Caspian is explaining to everyone that they saw a dragon fly over the trees and land on the beach, between them and the ship. He says they will have to wait for morning to fight it.
    • The adventurers wait until dawn. They try to eat a small meal to keep their strength up, but nobody is hungry. Everyone waits, feeling doomed, for the morning and the fight with the dragon.
    • Eventually Caspian gives the order, and they prepare to face the dragon. All the men draw their swords and form into a group, with Lucy in the middle. They march down to the beach and meet the dragon.
    • As they advance on the dragon, it retreats into the shallow water behind it and shakes its head.
    • Lucy notices that the dragon is crying. Drinian is suspicious and says the tears might be a trick. The dragon shakes its head, as if to say "no."
    • The adventurers realize that the dragon can understand them. Reepicheep steps forward and asks the dragon if it can speak. It shakes its head "no."
    • Reepicheep asks the dragon to raise its left leg if it wants to swear that it is friendly to them. It does, but it's clumsy because of the golden bracelet cutting into its leg.
    • Lucy runs toward the dragon without thinking and offers to heal its leg with her magic cordial. The cordial helps ease the pain, but it can't dissolve the gold bracelet.
    • Caspian, staring at the bracelet, notices something.
  • Chapter 7

    How the Adventure Ended

    • Caspian points out that the bracelet the dragon is wearing bears the symbol of one of the seven missing lords – Lord Octesian.
    • Reepicheep asks the dragon if it has eaten Lord Octesian. The dragon shakes its head.
    • Lucy suggests the dragon might be Lord Octesian under a spell. The dragon shakes its head. Then she asks if it is some other human being under a spell, and it nods. They realize that the dragon is Eustace.
    • The dragon cries and Lucy tries to comfort him. Everyone assures Eustace that they won't desert him and that they'll try to find a way to disenchant him.
    • Eustace is unable to explain what happened to him, partly because he can't speak and partly because he doesn't know how to tell a story. He keeps trying to write in the sand with his claws, but between his swishing tail and the waves coming up the beach, the words get washed away before he can finish.
    • Everyone notices that Eustace is a more helpful person now that he's been turned into a dragon. He helps with the rebuilding and provisioning of the ship by surveying the island, hunting for wild goats and swine, and uprooting a huge tree that they can use as a new mast. When it's rainy and cold, everyone sits against Eustace's hot dragon flanks and dries off. He lights fires by breathing on the firewood and he takes some of the other adventurers for rides through the air.
    • Eustace enjoys making friends and being a useful member of the party. However, he hates being a dragon. He is horrified and disgusted by his reflection in the water.
    • When Eustace isn't needed as a giant hot water bottle, he creeps away and lies by himself near the camp. When this happens, Reepicheep comes and comforts him, telling stories of other adventurers who had terrible things happen to them but who ended up living happily ever after.
    • As the repairs and preparations of the ship near completion, everyone starts to wonder what they will do with Eustace when they need to leave the island. When they think he's not listening, they talk about plans for fitting him onto the ship, and they worry about how they'll feed him.
    • Eustace, overhearing some of the comments, realizes that he is a nuisance – and that he has been since he first came on board the Dawn Treader.
    • Six days after they first landed on the island, Edmund wakes up in the very early morning and sees a human figure walking toward him through the woods. He draws his sword and goes to meet the stranger, but it turns out that no fight is necessary – it's Eustace, who is human again!
    • Eustace seems unwell. He asks Edmund to take a walk with him so that they can have a talk before Eustace has to see everybody else.
    • Edmund and Eustace go and sit on some rocks overlooking the bay. They watch the sunrise. Eustace says he wants to tell Edmund how he stopped being a dragon.
    • He begins his story:
    • Last night, Eustace says, he was miserable. The bracelet was cutting into his arm.
    • Edmund interrupts and asks if that's OK now. Eustace laughs and takes the bracelet off, saying that anyone can have it.
    • Eustace says he was lying awake last night wondering what would happen to him. He saw a huge lion coming toward him, lit by mysterious light. He felt great fear.
    • The lion walked right up to Eustace (who was still a dragon at this point) and looked him straight in the eyes. Eustace shut his eyes, but the lion, without speaking aloud, told him to follow it.
    • Eustace followed the lion into the woods for a long way. Eventually they came to the top of a mountain he had never seen before, even though he had flown all over the island. On the mountaintop was a garden with fruit trees and a well.
    • Eustace describes the well, which he says was like an enormous bathtub or pool and had water bubbling up from the bottom.
    • Eustace knew suddenly that if he could bathe in the well, the pain in his leg caused by the too-tight bracelet would go away. The lion told Eustace that he would have to undress before bathing.
    • Eustace realized that the lion meant he had to shed his skin like a snake. He scratched himself all over and his skin peeled off. He stepped out of it, feeling renewed, and started to get in the water.
    • As he looked down at his feet to step into the well, he realized that he was still just as wrinkled, scaly, and hard as before. He tore off another layer of skin and stepped out again.
    • For the second time, Eustace started to get into the well, but once again he saw that his skin was too rough and scaly. He peeled off a third skin, but it still wasn't enough.
    • The lion told Eustace that it would help him. Eustace lay down on his back and let the lion tear off all the layers of his dragonish exterior. He says it hurt a lot, but that it also felt good to have it peeled off.
    • Eustace stepped out of a thick, dark skin and felt smooth, soft, and tender all over. The lion picked him up and tossed him into the water. At first it hurt, but then it felt wonderful. Eustace noticed that the pain in his arm was gone and realized he had turned back into a boy.
    • After a while, Eustace says, the lion took him out of the water and dressed him in regular clothes somehow. Then, all of a sudden, he was back in the woods by the beach, walking up to Edmund.
    • That's the end of Eustace's story. He wonders if it was a dream, and Edmund says it wasn't – Eustace has seen Aslan!
    • Eustace apologizes to Edmund for his behavior so far during the voyage. Edmund forgives him and admits that he himself was a traitor on his first trip to Narnia.
    • Eustace asks Edmund about Aslan. Edmund explains that Aslan is the great Lion, son of the Emperor over Sea, who protects Narnia.
    • For a long time, Eustace and Edmund sit quietly together. They can see the sky turning pink as the sun rises. Soon they hear noises from the camp as everyone else gets up and gets going for the day.
    • Everyone is thrilled when they find out that Eustace is back to his human self. He tells them all how he turned into a dragon. They wonder whether the old dragon killed Octesian or was Octesian.
    • A few days later the Dawn Treader is ready to sail. Caspian has an inscription carved on the cliffs naming the island Dragon Island and recording his discovery of it and Lord Octesian's death.
    • From this time on, Eustace begins to be a different person. He's not perfect, and sometimes he's still a jerk, but this experience has changed him.
    • Eustace doesn't want the bracelet. Caspian offers it to Lucy, but she doesn't want it either. Caspian throws it in the air and says that whoever catches it can have it. But it catches on a projection of rock and remains hanging above the bay.
  • Chapter 8

    Two Narrow Escapes

    • The Dawn Treader sails away from Dragon Island and everyone is in high spirits.
    • The next morning they arrive at another island, which is uninhabited and has a few ruined huts, bones, and broken weapons. They speculate that pirates or the dragon attacked the people of the island and drove them away.
    • On this little island they find a coracle, which is a small boat made out of animal hide stretched over a wicker frame. It's just the right size for Reepicheep, so they keep it. They name the place Burnt Island and sail away.
    • For five days the Dawn Treader sails without any adventures. One rainy afternoon everyone gets pretty grumpy, but then the rain stops and Lucy notices something in the water that looks like a series of smooth rocks. The rocks are spaced at wide, even intervals of about 40 feet.
    • The adventurers realize that the things they're seeing can't be rocks because they keep appearing and disappearing. And they're getting closer!
    • The strange things that are not rocks move toward the Dawn Treader faster than it can sail away from them. Everyone holds their breath.
    • Suddenly the enormous head of a monster rears up out of the water on the port side of the ship. It's green and red with purple blotches and looks like a horse's head with fishy teeth and no ears.
    • As the monster rises out of the sea, its neck seems to go on forever, then they realize that that's its body. It's the great Sea Serpent. (You know, the kind of thing people imagine when they think of the Loch Ness Monster.)
    • Everyone grabs weapons and they shoot arrows at it, but there's really nothing they can do. For a moment the monster hovers beside them, its head towering in the air above the ship.
    • Quick as a flash, the monster dives down into the water on the starboard side of the ship. It has made an arch across the Dawn Treader
    • with its body, and as it dives the arch gets smaller.
    • Eustace bravely draws the sword Caspian lent him and hacks at the monster's body. The sword breaks into pieces.
    • Reepicheep shouts to everyone to push instead of fighting. He throws himself against the loop of the sea serpent's body and starts pushing. He's too small to move it himself, but when everyone realizes what he's doing, they start to help.
    • What Reepicheep has realized is this: the monster has made a loop of its body around the ship, and now it's drawing the loop closed. The ship will be crushed!
    • Soon every single person on the ship is pushing against the monster's body. Slowly, with a great deal of effort, they begin to move it toward the stern (the back end of the ship).
    • At the very tip of the ship, they get stuck. Because the Dawn Treader is made to look like a dragon, the stern of the ship is carved to look like a dragon's tail sticking up into the air. Caspian shouts for someone to bring an axe and hack it off.
    • Lucy runs and gets an axe, but before anyone can use it, the serpent pulls harder and snaps off the carved stern of the ship. Luckily, however, the rest of the ship is OK.
    • Exhausted, the adventurers watch as the sea serpent looks for the ship's wreckage in the water. It's too dumb to understand that it didn't crush the ship, so it doesn't pursue them as they sail away.
    • Everyone lies around recovering from the immense physical effort of throwing off the sea serpent. As they start to feel better, they talk and laugh about the experience and praise Eustace and Reepicheep.
    • The Dawn Treader sails on for three more days without incident. Four days after the adventure with the sea serpent, a storm starts to gather, but they sight land. Lord Drinian and Caspian decide to row the ship into a natural harbor along the coast of this new island and wait until the storm passes.
    • They successfully get the Dawn Treader into harbor and sleep on the ship that night. In the morning, they launch a small boat from the ship and go ashore to explore.
    • As they row the boat toward the land, Caspian notices that there are two different streams coming into the bay. Drinian wants to go to the one on the starboard (the right), because it's not as far for everyone to row. Everyone else wants to go to the one to port (the left), because it's in a grove of trees and will shelter them from the rain.
    • Reluctantly, Drinian changes course and the boat heads to the stream to port. The narrator tells us that this small course correction will turn out to be a very good decision.
    • They fill up their casks with fresh water for the ship. By the time they're done, it has stopped raining.
    • Caspian, Eustace, Lucy, Edmund, and Reepicheep go for a hike up a nearby hill. From the top, they can see that the island is small and desolate.
    • As they look toward the eastern horizon, Eustace comments that their voyage is crazy. He says it out of habit, not out of rudeness, like he would have before.
    • Lucy suggests that they hike over to the other stream, the one Drinian wanted to go to. They all agree.
    • They discover that the source of the other stream is a deep mountain lake surrounded by cliffs that block out the wind. They sit down to rest.
    • When Edmund sits down, he finds himself sitting on a rusty old sword. Caspian examines the sword and says that it's Narnian. Lucy discovers that she is sitting on a chain mail shirt. (That's the kind of metal chain shirt that medieval knights wear when they're going into battle.) They all search in the heather and find all kinds of artifacts – a helmet, a dagger, and coins. All of the things are Narnian, and Edmund suggests that perhaps one of the seven lords was here.
    • They are puzzled by the evidence they've found. None of the weapons have any blood on them, and there are no bones. Even if the lord had been eaten by a wild animal, it couldn't have taken off his mail shirt.
    • Feeling creeped out, the adventurers hike down to the place where the stream comes out of the lake. Eustace is about to take a drink of water when Reepicheep and Lucy call out.
    • What Reepicheep and Lucy are pointing to is a life-size statue of a man. The statue, which appears to be made of gold, is lying on the bottom of the pool.
    • Everyone is impressed. Caspian wants to try to get the statue out. Reepicheep suggests diving for it, but Edmund thinks the statue will be too heavy to carry up while swimming.
    • Edmund lowers his spear into the water to measure the depth of the pool. As the spear goes in, Lucy observes that it looks gold, too. Maybe the statue isn't gold but just looks that way due to a trick of the light
    • Edmund drops the spear, saying that it suddenly became heavy. It falls to the bottom of the pool, looking just like the statue.
    • Edmund looks at his boots, then stands up and orders everyone away from the water. They all back away and stare at him.
    • Edmund shows them that, where the water splashed on his boots, they turned to solid gold. The water of the pool is magical and can turn anything into gold.
    • They realize that their "statue" is one of the missing lords. He must have come to the pool on a hot day, undressed, jumped in, and been turned to gold. Lucy is horrified by this strange death. The adventurers feel lucky that none of them dipped their hands or feet into the water.
    • Caspian tests the properties of the water by dipping a sprig of heather into it. When he lifts it out, it is a perfect model of a sprig of heather made of gold.
    • Caspian claims the island and the spring for Narnia. He names it Goldwater Island and orders everyone to keep it secret.
    • Edmund objects, saying that he ranks higher than Caspian in the Narnian monarchy. Caspian lays his hand on his sword.
    • Lucy begs Edmund and Caspian to stop fighting, but then her voice dies away. Everyone looks in the direction she is looking and sees Aslan, the great lion, walking through the heather. He's there for just a moment, then he's gone.
    • The adventurers turn to one another again. They seem to be waking up or coming back to themselves. Caspian asks what they were talking about and apologizes if he was being a jerk.
    • Reepicheep says the island is cursed and they should call it Deathwater Island.
    • Caspian says that's a good name, but he can't remember why. Everyone's memory of the discovery is fuzzy. They head back to where Drinian and the others are camped, then go back to the ship.
    • Later, Drinian says to Rhince that the three monarchs seemed strange when they came on board. They wouldn't or couldn't tell him much, except that they found the body of one of the lords.
    • Rhince observes that they have now found three of the seven lords and only have four more to go!
  • Chapter 9

    The Island of the Voices

    • The Dawn Treader sails on, traveling directly east thanks to a wind from due west. The ocean seems to go on and on and they don't see any fish or birds or land. Stores of food are low and they wonder if they should turn back.
    • On the last day before they turn back, they see an island. They make harbor (anchor the ship) in a bay beside the island in the afternoon and go ashore in the boat.
    • The island seems deserted, but it's clearly inhabited, because the lawns are mowed and the trees have been spaced and trimmed. They find a sandy path leading to a large house.
    • As they start down the path, Lucy stops to take a rock out of her shoe. She doesn't mention it to the others and they go on without her, not noticing that she has stopped. Lucy's shoelace gets tangled and she has to spend a long time untangling it.
    • While Lucy is sitting on the ground with her back to a tree, she hears a strange thumping noise that seems to be getting closer and closer. She sits absolutely still and hopes she won't be seen.
    • As the thumping gets closer, Lucy can feel the ground shaking, but she can't see anything. Right in front of her, there is a loud thump and the sand on the path scatters – but she still doesn't see anyone or anything.
    • The noises seem to gather about twenty feet away from Lucy, and a voice speaks out of thin air. The voice says, "Mates, now's our chance" (9.9).
    • As Lucy listens, a chorus of voices agrees with this Chief Voice. The Chief Voice describes their plan: they will go down to the beach, get between the adventurers and their boat, and attack them.
    • The other voices agree and Lucy hears the thumps again. This time, the noises get fainter and fainter as the invisible people move away from Lucy and back toward the shore.
    • Lucy gets up and runs along the path after her friends to warn them.
    • Meanwhile, Caspian, Eustace, Edmund, Reepicheep, and Drinian have reached the house. It's a two-story building partly covered with ivy. Someone definitely lives there, because smoke is coming out of the chimney.
    • They walk through a gateway into a courtyard, where they see the handle of a water pump moving on its own. Caspian wonders if it's magic. Eustace is excited to see machinery, which indicates civilization.
    • Lucy rushes into the courtyard and explains what she has overheard.
    • Everyone is upset by the news that invisible enemies are waiting to besiege them. Edmund questions Lucy about what the creatures might look like. All she knows is that they're not exactly human, because instead of footsteps they make a weird thumping sound.
    • Caspian realizes that one of the invisible people is working the water pump, so they move into a grove of trees to talk privately. But, as Eustace points out, you can't hide from people you can't see.
    • They discuss their options. Caspian wants to abandon the boat, go down to another part of the shore, and signal to the Dawn Treader. Drinian says the water wouldn't be deep enough for it to come to them. Lucy suggests swimming.
    • Reepicheep argues that it's pointless to try to avoid an invisible enemy and suggests they go straight down to the shore and bravely face whatever they find there. Edmund agrees with Reepicheep.
    • Lucy wonders whether, if Rhince and the men see them fighting, they will help. Eustace says that, because their enemies are invisible, it will look like they're just play-fighting.
    • Everyone shakes hands and gets weapons ready. They march down to the beach.
    • Before they can get to the sand, the Chief Voice speaks again, warning them not to go any farther. It says there are more than 50 of them, armed, on the beach. The chorus of voices agrees with the Chief.
    • Reepicheep says he doesn't see 50 warriors. The Chief Voice says they're invisible.
    • Caspian tells Reepicheep to be quiet and asks what the invisible people want from them. The Chief Voice says they want Lucy to do something.
    • Reepicheep tells the voices that Lucy is a Queen, and that if they want her to do anything dishonorable or dangerous, she will be defended.
    • The Chief Voice says it's a long story and invites them to sit down. The Narnians don't sit, but the invisible people seem to.
    • The Chief tells the story of his people: The island has been controlled by a great magician for as long as anyone can remember. His people are, or maybe were, the magician's servants.
    • One day the magician gave his servants an order and they refused to carry it out. The magician was enraged and put a spell on them that made them so ugly they couldn't bear to look at one another.
    • That night, when the magician went to sleep, some of the people crept upstairs to look at his magic books and try to figure out how to undo the spell. They couldn't manage to reverse the spell, so instead they cast another one to make themselves invisible.
    • The Chief Voice's daughter, Clipsie, recited the invisibility spell. Apparently, the spell had to be spoken by the magician himself or by a little girl.
    • At first, the people were relieved not to see how ugly they were. But now they're tired of being invisible. Also, the magician seems to have become invisible, too, or maybe left or died, and they want to know where he is.
    • The narrator explains that it takes a long time for the Chief Voice to tell this story because the other voices keep interrupting him by agreeing with him, saying that he's right, and encouraging him to keep telling the story.
    • When the story is finished, the Narnians sit silently for a while. Lucy asks what it has to do with them.
    • The Chief Voice is surprised that he's managed to leave out the main point. He explains that they've been waiting for a little girl to arrive on the island so that she could go upstairs in the magician's house and undo the invisibility spell. They are sworn not to let any visitors leave unless she does so.
    • Reepicheep says he can't see the people's weapons. A spear comes whizzing through the air and hits a tree behind him. The Chief Voice explains that their weapons become visible once they leave their hands.
    • Lucy asks why one of the invisible people can't perform this task – aren't there any little girls among them? They admit that there are, but that they're too afraid to send their own daughters.
    • Edmund and Caspian are disgusted by the cowardice of the invisible people.
    • Lucy asks whether she has to perform the task at night or whether she can do it during the day. They say she can do it in daylight. Lucy agrees.
    • Caspian and Edmund try to talk Lucy out of doing something so dangerous, but Lucy says she would be saving her own life, too. She doesn't want to be hacked to pieces by an invisible sword.
    • Lucy also points out that it might not be very dangerous – the invisible people don't seem very brave. Eustace agrees and says they don't seem very smart, either.
    • Reepicheep agrees with Lucy's plan. They have no way to save her by fighting, he says, and the deed she's going to perform is heroic and honorable.
    • The others give in and allow Lucy to perform the task. The invisible people cheer. The Chief Voice invites them to have supper and spend the night with them before Lucy goes to face the magician in the morning. They go back to the house, with the strange thumping noises following them.
  • Chapter 10

    The Magician's Book

    • The invisible people serve a feast to their Narnian visitors. Dishes of food come floating through the air, carried by invisible hands. Strangely, the dishes don't move parallel to the floor, as though they were being carried by human beings; they leap up toward the ceiling in large arcs and jumps.
    • Eustace whispers to Edmund that the invisible people might be like giant grasshoppers or frogs. Edmund tells him not to say so aloud – Lucy doesn't like insects.
    • The meal is a bit strange. For one thing, much of the food gets spilled and slopped because of the weird hopping the invisible people do. For another, the people agree with everything anyone says and make all kinds of banal remarks, like water is wet and night is dark. Overall, however, the food is delicious.
    • In the morning Lucy wakes up feeling apprehensive. The weather is beautiful but she can't enjoy it or eat anything at breakfast.
    • The Chief Voice gives Lucy instructions. She says goodbye to her friends and starts walking up the stairs in the magician's house.
    • Lucy goes up two flights of stairs, feeling glad that there's a window to let in the daylight. At the top of the stairs there is a long, carpeted hallway lined with doors and a window at the opposite end.
    • Lucy knows she has to go in the last door on the left. Slowly she begins to walk down the long hallway, fearing that the magician might be lurking behind any door.
    • Lucy reminds herself that there's nothing to fear – yet. The passage is eerily silent. Some of the doors have strange, frightening symbols painted on them in red. Masks hang on the walls and Lucy finds the empty eye-holes creepy.
    • Suddenly Lucy sees a strange, bearded face beside her. She stops to look at it and realizes that it's a mirror with a wig and beard attached, so that when you look at it you see your own face looking different. She keeps going.
    • Finally, Lucy reaches the last door on the left. The door is open, revealing a library filled with all kinds of books. The book Lucy needs, the Magic Book, is lying on a desk in the middle of the room. To read it, she'll have to stand with her back to the door.
    • Lucy tries to shut the door, but it won't close. She really doesn't want to stand with her back to the empty hallway while she examines the book, but she has no choice.
    • The Chief Voice couldn't tell Lucy what part of the book the spell for making things visible would be in, so she'll have to start at the beginning.
    • Lucy puts her hand on the book, which makes her fingers tingle. She unfastens two lead clasps and opens the book. The book itself is beautiful; it's handwritten on crisp, smooth paper and has pictures around the capital letters at the beginning of each spell.
    • There's no title page or table of contents, so Lucy starts at the beginning. There are all kinds of different spells, but they don't seem evil – they're for curing minor problems like toothaches or doing useful things like capturing a swarm of bees.
    • Lucy flips through the book, reading spell after spell. The pictures seem to come to life before her eyes.
    • Soon Lucy comes to a spell to make her beautiful. As she looks at the pictures, she sees an image of herself standing at the reading desk, just the way she is now. In the next picture, she sees herself reciting the spell, and in the last picture, she is unnaturally beautiful.
    • The picture of the beautiful Lucy seems to be life-size, even though it's still in the book. Lucy begins to see pictures of herself being fought over by kings in tournaments and wars. She sees pictures of her sister Susan, who has always been the pretty one, looking plain beside the gorgeous version of Lucy.
    • Lucy says aloud that she will say the spell – but she has a strong feeling she shouldn't. When she looks at the top of the page for the first words, she finds herself looking at a very lifelike picture of Aslan growling at her. She feels frightened and quickly turns the page.
    • Lucy continues reading the book. She comes to a spell that lets you know what your friends think about you. Because she didn't get to say the other, Lucy says this one quickly, before she can reconsider.
    • In the book, she sees a picture of two schoolgirls, her friends Marjorie and Anne, sitting on a train. The picture comes to life, like a movie, and she can hear what they're saying.
    • Anne asks Marjorie whether she'll hang out with her this school semester, or whether she'll spend all her time with Lucy. Marjorie says she won't be around Lucy as much – she says Lucy is nice but a little kid, and that she got tired of her.
    • Lucy is angry and starts shouting at Marjorie, but then realizes that the images can't hear her. Lucy remembers how she stood by Marjorie when other people wouldn't and can't believe Marjorie would say things like this about her to Anne.
    • Lucy notices that there are other moving pictures of her friends in the book, but she turns the page without looking at them.
    • On the next page there is a spell "for the refreshment of the spirit" (10.31). It's less like a spell than a story. As Lucy reads she gets absorbed in the story, as though she were really living it. At the end, she tries to go back and read it again, but the magic book won't allow you to turn back. Soon Lucy can't even remember the details of the story, but she remembers how exciting and wonderful it was to read.
    • Soon Lucy finds a page with no pictures and a spell to make hidden things visible. As she reads the spell aloud, pictures begin to appear in the margins of the book. Lucy realizes that she's made everything invisible on the island visible again.
    • Behind her, Lucy hears footsteps. She turns around and sees Aslan. Lucy runs to Aslan and hugs and kisses him.
    • Lucy says it was nice of Aslan to come. Aslan says he was there all along, but her spell made him visible. Lucy didn't think she had any power over Aslan, but he tells her he always obeys his own rules.
    • Aslan confronts Lucy about her eavesdropping and tells her it's just as bad to spy on people by magic as by any other means. He tells her that Marjorie is weak but does love Lucy in spite of what she said.
    • Lucy says she won't be able to forget what she heard Marjorie say. Lucy asks whether, if she hadn't said the spell, she and Marjorie would have been great friends. Aslan says nobody gets to know what would have happened.
    • Lucy asks Aslan whether she'll ever read the beautiful story again – the spell for the refreshment of the spirit. He says he will tell it to her for years and years. Right now, though, they need to meet the owner of the house.
  • Chapter 11

    The Dufflepuds Made Happy

    • Lucy follows Aslan into the hallway and they see an old man dressed in a red robe coming toward them. The man bows to Aslan and welcomes him. It's the Magician!
    • Aslan asks the Magician, whose name is Coriarkin, if he is tired of ruling foolish people. Coriarkin says no, his people are foolish but not bad. He hopes that soon they can be governed by wisdom instead of the brute force of magic.
    • Coriarkin asks Aslan if he'll show himself to the people. Aslan says no, they aren't ready to see him because they would find him too frightening. He also says that, before sunset, he needs to visit Trumpkin the Dwarf, who is the acting ruler of Narnia while Caspian is gone.
    • Aslan tells Lucy they will meet again soon, but admits that he thinks of all times as "soon." He fades away, and Lucy and the Magician feel depressed.
    • The Magician asks Lucy if she enjoyed his book. She says she enjoyed parts of it a lot.
    • Lucy asks the Magician if he knew she was there. He says that when he let the Duffers make themselves invisible, he knew Lucy would be coming to remove the spell, but he didn't know when. Being invisible made him sleepy, so he was taken by surprise when she showed up in the morning.
    • The Magician asks Lucy if she's hungry. She says yes, and he offers her a meal. They go into another room along the passage and the Magician makes a meal appear with a word. He provides English food for Lucy, as a contrast to the Narnian food she's been eating. He himself eats simply, just bread and wine.
    • Lucy and the Magician have a friendly chat while they eat. She asks if the spell will work and he tells her that it already did, but the others are probably taking their midday nap right now and haven't yet discovered that they are visible.
    • Lucy asks the Magician if he will reverse the uglifying spell. The Magician says he didn't exactly make them ugly – some people might think they were uglier before!
    • The Magician explains that the people admire their Chief and he has taught them to be vain. The people believe everything the Chief says, which is a problem, but at least they admire someone.
    • Lucy asks why the Magician changed the appearance of the people in the first place. He says they are supposed to tend a garden and raise food for themselves, and he wanted them to irrigate it using a nearby stream instead of a distant spring. They refused.
    • Lucy is surprised that the people are so stupid, and the Magician tells her some of their exploits. At one point, they tried to wash their dishes before dinner. Another time, they planted cooked potatoes so that they wouldn't have to cook them later. And on one occasion, a cat got into the dairy, so they moved all the milk out – instead of just moving the cat.
    • Lucy has finished her meal, so the Magician takes her into another room where they can look out the window at the Duffers. Lucy doesn't see any people outside but notices about 50 weird mushroom-like things with stalks three feet high and crowns about as big as umbrellas. There is a small bundle under each one.
    • The clock strikes three. All the "mushrooms" turn over – each crown is a single enormous foot, each stalk is a single thick leg, and the little "bundle" is the head and body of each creature.
    • Lucy bursts out laughing and asks if the Magician made them look like that. He laughs too and says yes – he turned his people, the Duffers, into Monopods, one-footed dwarf-like creatures.
    • As Lucy and the Magician watch from the window, the people hop around with enormous bounces, making loud thumps when they land on the ground. This is the thumping that the Narnians heard when the invisible people were moving around.
    • Lucy can hear the Duffers talking about how they're visible again. They praise her and say that she must have fooled the old Magician.
    • Lucy is surprised that the Duffers dare to talk about the Magician that way. He laughs and says that sometimes they think he is all-seeing and all-knowing and dangerous, and sometimes they think he's a fool who can be easily tricked.
    • Lucy asks whether the Duffers have to be turned back into their original shape. She says they seem nice as they are. The magician says they were just common dwarfs before.
    • Lucy decides to tell the Duffers that they look very nice as Monopods. She thanks the Magician for lunch and runs downstairs.
    • At the bottom of the stairs Lucy finds all her friends waiting anxiously to find out what happened to her. She feels guilty that she left them there so long. She tells them that the Magician is great, that she saw Aslan, and that everything is OK.
    • Lucy runs outside to the Monopods. They cheer for her, and the Chief apologizes for their ugliness. The others agree that they are very ugly now.
    • Lucy says she thinks the Monopods look very nice. They agree with her that they look very handsome.
    • The Chief says that Lucy is saying they looked nice before being "uglified." They agree with him.
    • Lucy says that's not what she means at all – she thinks they look nice now. They agree with her.
    • Lucy continues trying to convince the Monopods that they look good now, and that she's not saying the same thing the Chief is, but they are so stupid and so agreeable that she can't get her point across. The Monopods seem happy, though, and she decides that's what matters.
    • Before nightfall, Caspian and the other Narnians head back to the ship to reassure Rhince and the others that they're OK. (Remember, they spent the night on the island without warning, and they haven't communicated with the ship in more than 24 hours.)
    • The Monopods accompany the Narnians to the shore. They are so chatty and obnoxious that Eustace wishes the Magician had made them inaudible instead of invisible, but then he spends a long time trying to explain what he means.
    • When the whole group reaches the water, Reepicheep has an idea. He lowers his coracle (the little boat he got in Chapter 8) and paddles around. The Monopods are interested, and then he suggests that they try jumping lightly into the water, using their enormous feet to float on.
    • The Chief tries to persuade them not to, but a few of the more adventurous Monopods try it, and it works perfectly – their huge feet are like natural boats! Soon all of the Monopods are floating on the water and making paddles to help themselves move.
    • The Duffers like their new name, Monopods, but they can't quite get it right. They mix it up with their old name and eventually settle on calling themselves the Dufflepuds.
    • That night the Narnians dine with the Magician, who magically provides each person with the food he or she likes best. Lucy notices that the hallway seems much less creepy now that she knows the Magician is nice.
    • After dinner, the Magician sets some sheets of parchment on the table and asks Drinian to describe the voyage of the Dawn Treader. As Drinian speaks, the Magician causes everything he describes to appear on the parchment, making a magically accurate map of everything they have seen and done so far.
    • The Magician tells the Narnians that, seven years earlier, Lords Revilian, Argoz, Mavramorn, and Rhoop visited his island. The Narnians figure out that the lord who was turned into a gold statue (see Chapter 8) was Restimar.
    • The next day, the Magician restocks the ship for them, everyone says goodbye, and the Dawn Treader sets sail again.
  • Chapter 12

    The Dark Island

    Edition Note: There are two editions of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, and the main difference between them is in some of the details of Chapter 12. Our summary is of the original British version of the book, which is also the edition published in the United States since 1994. If you have a pre-1994 American edition, your Chapter 12 might be slightly different. For more info on this point, including a quick test to figure out which edition you have if you're not sure, check out the "Trivia" section.

    • The Dawn Treader sails south and east for almost two weeks. Lucy and Reepicheep play a lot of chess. On the thirteenth day away from the island of the Dufflepuds, Edmund spots a dark mountain in the distance.
    • They set sail toward the land, rowing a lot because the wind isn't coming from the right direction. They row all day and night.
    • The next day the wind is flat. The darkness is larger and closer, but still fuzzy, like a mist.
    • Around 9 in the morning, they get close to it and realize that it's not land or mist – just a smooth, solid patch of black, like the darkness inside the mouth of a long tunnel.
    • Caspian shouts to the boatswain (one of the officers) to keep the ship back. Caspian and Drinian discuss what they should do. Drinian advises not to go into the blackness. Several of the sailors agree, and so does Edmund. Lucy and Eustace don't want to say anything, and seem afraid, but they also hope the ship won't go into the blackness.
    • Reepicheep interrupts, arguing that the only reason not to go into the blackness is cowardice, and that noble adventurers don't turn back just because it's getting dark.
    • Drinian asks what use it would be to go into the darkness. Reepicheep says it wouldn't be useful, but that the purpose of their voyage is to explore and have adventures. Turning back, he claims, would be dishonorable.
    • Several of the sailors mutter that they don't care about honor. Caspian is irritated with Reepicheep, but says they will go on, unless Lucy doesn't want to. Lucy says she's game, even though she feels very nervous.
    • Drinian suggests lights, and Caspian orders the lanterns to be lit. The Dawn Treader has three large lanterns at the stern (the back end of the ship), the prow (the front of the ship), and the mast. Drinian also orders two torches in the middle of the ship.
    • Everyone who's not rowing comes on deck and prepares for a possible battle. Lucy and two others are ready with bows and arrows. Rynelf gets ready to take soundings – that is, to check the depth of the water using a line with a weight on the end. Reepicheep, Edmund, Eustace, and Caspian put on their chain mail and get their swords ready. Drinian steers.
    • Caspian orders the men at the oars to row forward. Everyone is silent, waiting for orders.
    • The ship moves forward slowly and enters the darkness. The only light comes from the lanterns and the torches. It gets very cold.
    • For a long time the ship moves forward slowly and almost silently into the unnatural darkness. Everyone starts to shiver from the cold.
    • Suddenly there is an inhuman cry of terror. Reepicheep asks who calls and whether they are friend or foe.
    • The voice replies, crying for mercy and begging to be taken on board.
    • Caspian asks where the voice is and welcomes the person aboard.
    • The man cries out again and they hear him swimming toward them. Caspian orders the sailors to help heave the man up with ropes.
    • When the man is brought on board, his appearance is startling. He is thin, wearing rags, with long untidy hair and wide, staring eyes. He looks terrified.
    • As soon as the man gets onto the deck, he begs them to get away from the darkness as fast as they can.
    • Reepicheep asks the man to calm down and explain what's going on. The man tells them that this is the island where dreams come true.
    • The sailors are excited and start talking about their hopes and dreams. But the man angrily corrects them – it's not daydreams but actual dreams that come true.
    • There is a short silence while everyone remembers nightmares they've had in the past. Then they all spring into action – men rush to the oars, Drinian steers the ship around, and they hightail it out of there!
    • Reepicheep objects, pointing out that this is a cowardly mutiny. Caspian is shouting orders to the men to get the ship out of there. He tells Reepicheep that "there are some things no man can face."
    • Lucy, who is aloft in the "fighting top," is remembering one of her own nightmares and hoping they make it out of the darkness before it becomes reality.
    • Despite the noise made by the men rowing, there is an eerie silence surrounding the ship, and everyone can hear strange little noises in the silence.
    • Eustace can hear an enormous pair of scissors opening and shutting.
    • Rynelf can hear enemies crawling up the sides of the ship.
    • Caspian can hear a monster about to settle on the mast.
    • One of the sailors can hear ominous gongs.
    • Caspian goes over to Drinian and quietly asks how long they rowed into the darkness. Drinian says they rowed in for five minutes, and Caspian points out that they have already been rowing out for longer than that. Everybody on the ship starts to fear they are going around in circles.
    • The strange man, lying on the deck, laughs hysterically and says they will never get out.
    • Lucy whispers to Aslan, asking him to send help to them. She feels better after calling on him and realizes that nothing bad has actually happened yet.
    • Rynelf calls everyone's attention to a speck of light. As they turn to look at it, it becomes a bright spotlight. In the light they see something cross-shaped moving toward them. It's an albatross!
    • The albatross circles around the mast three times, whispering secretly to Lucy in Aslan's voice that she must have courage. Then it begins to fly slowly ahead of them, leading the way through the darkness. Drinian steers the ship to follow it.
    • After a few moments the blackness turns grey, then into bright light. The ship is back in the sunlit ocean with no harm done.
    • Everyone laughs. Rynelf says they have been foolish.
    • Lucy comes down to the deck where everyone is gathered around the strange man they picked up in the darkness. He cries tears of joy.
    • When he can speak, the man thanks them for rescuing him and says that he is Lord Rhoop of Narnia. Caspian introduces himself and explains his quest.
    • Lord Rhoop asks Caspian never to take him back there. But as he points in the direction of the darkness and everyone looks that way, they see that the darkness has vanished without a trace.
    • Lord Rhoop says they have destroyed the darkness. Lucy says it wasn't them, implying that it was Aslan.
    • The Dawn Treader sets sail for the southeast and the men take a break after all the rowing. Nobody notices that the albatross is gone.
  • Chapter 13

    The Three Sleepers

    • The Dawn Treader sails east. Every day the wind and waves get a little softer, and the ship glides smoothly across the water. At night they see constellations never recorded by anyone in Narnia.
    • One night, during a beautiful sunset, they see land. As they get close to this island, they see that it is covered in low hills and has a nice smell.
    • They anchor the ship in a shallow bay beside the island and go ashore in the boat. Lord Rhoop stays on the Dawn Treader.
    • Caspian leads a group of adventurers inland to explore the island. There are no signs that anyone lives there, and they have a pleasant walk across a countryside covered with a plant that's similar to heather.
    • Drinian sees something tall in the distance, and nobody's sure whether it's trees, towers, or giants. As they get closer, Lucy guesses that it's a ruin.
    • When they arrive at the structure, they see that it's a large rectangular space paved with smooth stones and bordered by tall pillars. It has no roof. Filling the space is a large table on which there is an enormous feast.
    • The adventurers wonder who the feast is for. Edmund notices that there is a strange hairy mass of three figures at the end of the table.
    • The mass looks like several beavers, or a huge bird's nest, or a haystack. Reepicheep runs up it then calls everyone over, saying these people won't fight.
    • The adventurers get closer and see that the three figures are men whose hair and beards have grown until they – and part of the table – are enveloped in a mat of hair.
    • Caspian asks whether the men are dead. Reepicheep says they are warm and have heartbeats, and Eustace realizes they are asleep. Lucy thinks it must be an enchanted sleep and that it's their duty to break the spell.
    • Caspian shakes one of the men. The man mutters something about going back to Narnia, but he doesn't wake up all the way. The next man they shake murmurs something about going east, and the third man just asks for Mustard.
    • Drinian calls Caspian's attention to the reference to Narnia. Caspian looks at the signet rings on the men's fingers and realizes they are the three remaining lords, Revilian, Argoz, and Mavramorn.
    • Rhince wants to eat the feast while they talk about what to do, but Caspian, Reepicheep, and some of the sailors think the food is probably responsible for the three lords' enchanted sleep.
    • Rynelf points out that the sun is setting. Most of the men want to go back to the ship. Edmund agrees and says there is no reason for them to stay there all night.
    • Reepicheep says that he's going to sit at the table until sunrise, because this is a great adventure and he doesn't want to miss out on such an exciting mystery.
    • Edmund, Caspian, and Lucy say they will stay with Reepicheep. Eustace, showing surprising bravery, also volunteers.
    • Eventually Drinian and the sailors go back to the ship for the night, leaving Reepicheep and his four companions behind.
    • The five adventurers sit at the table, close enough to the sleeping lords to keep an eye on them, but not too close. They talk at first, but then the conversation lags and they simply sit and listen to the waves.
    • Just before dawn everyone suddenly feels very awake. Outside the pillars there is a hill. A door in the hill opens and a figure carrying a light comes out.
    • The figure slowly moves toward them, and they see that it's a tall, yellow-haired girl dressed in blue, carrying a candle in a silver candlestick. She is incredibly beautiful.
    • The girl places the candlestick on the table. In the light of the flame, Lucy sees a strange, ancient-looking stone knife that she didn't notice before.
    • Everyone stands up to greet the girl. She asks them why they aren't eating and drinking the food on Aslan's Table.
    • Caspian explains that they were afraid the food put the men to sleep. She says they never tasted it.
    • Lucy asks what happened to the men. The girl says they arrived seven years ago in a ship that was falling apart. When they sat down at the table, they had an argument about what to do next. One of them wanted to return to Narnia, one wanted to keep sailing east, and one wanted to settle down on the island. In the course of the argument, the one who wanted to sail east grabbed the Knife of Stone. When he did, all three of them fell into their enchanted sleep.
    • Eustace asks what the Knife of Stone is. Lucy says she thinks she's seen it before – it's the knife that the White Witch used to kill Aslan in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. The girl confirms that she's right.
    • Edmund asks how they can know that the girl is telling the truth and is their friend. He says when he looks at her face, he believes her, but that's what would happen if she was an evil witch, too. (After his first experience in Narnia, Edmund isn't quite as trusting as he used to be.)
    • The girl says they can't be sure she is a friend; they can only choose to believe her or not. There is a pause. Reepicheep asks Caspian to fill a cup with wine for him, then he drinks to the lady. Soon everyone is eating the delicious food.
    • Lucy asks why it is called Aslan's Table. The girl says it is laid there on Aslan's orders for anyone who adventures so far east.
    • Eustace asks how the food stays fresh. The girl says it's renewed every day, and they will see the process.
    • Caspian asks how they can wake the enchanted sleepers. He tells her that, in the world that Edmund, Lucy, and Eustace come from, there is a story about a prince who kisses a princess to dissolve an enchanted sleep. Looks like Caspian is falling for her! The girl tells him that here it is the opposite: he has to break the spell before he can kiss the princess.
    • Caspian once again asks how to wake the sleepers. The girl says her father will explain and points to the door in the hillside. The sky is getting lighter and it's almost dawn....
  • Chapter 14

    The Beginning of the End of the World

    • As the door in the hillside opens, an old man with a silver beard and hair emerges. He seems to emit his own light.
    • Everyone gets up again and stands to greet the man. Without speaking to them, he comes to stand across the table from his daughter. They raise their arms, face the east, and begin to sing a high-pitched, beautiful song that seems to fit the cold morning.
    • As the man and his daughter sing, the sun rises and a ray of light hits the Stone Knife. The adventurers notice that the sun looks much bigger now than it did when they were closer to Narnia.
    • Suddenly thousands of large white birds fly from the center of the sun toward them, echoing the song. One bird flies up to the old man and feeds him a tiny glowing fruit that it carries in its beak.
    • The birds stop singing and quickly consume all the food remaining on the table. Then they fly away, carrying the scraps and bones and rinds with them. The table is empty.
    • The man turns to Caspian and welcomes him. Caspian asks him how to undo the spell that is keeping the lords asleep.
    • The man tells Caspian that to break the enchantment he has to sail as close as possible to the end of the World and leave at least one person behind.
    • Reepicheep asks what will happen to the person left behind, and the man says that person will go on into the east and never come back. Reepicheep says that's what he wants to do.
    • Caspian asks how close they are to the World's End and what else might lie to the east. The man says he saw it a long time ago from very high up, but he can't give them many details.
    • Eustace asks if the man was flying through the air. He says his name is Ramandu. None of them recognize the name, and he tells them he used to be a star. Now he is a star at rest, and every morning a bird feeds him a fireberry which takes away a little of his age. When he is young enough he will become a star again.
    • Eustace objects, saying that a star is a big flaming ball of gas, not a person. Ramandu says that is just what a star is made of.
    • Ramandu also tells them that they have already met one star, Coriarkin. However, Coriarkin isn't at rest; he was sent to govern the Duffers as a punishment. Caspian asks what crime Coriarkin committed, but Ramandu says it's not appropriate for him to know.
    • Ramandu asks them to decide: are they going to go home or try to break the spell? Reepicheep and Caspian say there is no question: they'll try to rescue the lords.
    • Caspian is concerned about the crew, who agreed only to seek out the missing lords, not to find the end of the world. He's also worried about Lord Rhoop, who seems too traumatized to go on any more adventures.
    • Ramandu says that if Caspian tried to go to the end of the world with an unwilling crew, he wouldn't be able to break the spell.
    • Caspian tells Ramandu Lord Rhoop's story. Ramandu says that Rhoop should come ashore, where he can sleep without dreams and recuperate.
    • Drinian and the rest of the sailors approach. When they see Ramandu and his daughter, they take off their hats. Some of the men are disappointed that all the tasty food is gone.
    • Caspian explains Ramandu's offer to Drinian and they send for Lord Rhoop. While they're waiting for him, everybody sits down and Caspian explains the situation.
    • One of the sailors, the Master Bowman, asks how they are going to get home when all the winds have been blowing them further east. Drinian says that every sailor knows the wind will change direction with the seasons and take them home soon.
    • Another sailor agrees with Drinian and says they should spend the winter on the island then head home in the spring.
    • Eustace asks what they will eat. Ramandu says the table will be set with a feast every day at sunset.
    • Rynelf points out that at the beginning of the voyage everyone was talking about adventure and finding the end of the world, and now some of the same people are talking about being cautious and staying on the island eating rich food. Some sailors agree with him, while others still feel nervous.
    • Edmund asks Caspian what they would do if half the men refused to come. Caspian says to wait.
    • Lucy asks Reepicheep what he will do. Reepicheep says he will sail east with the Dawn Treader as long as he can, then paddle east in his little coracle as far as possible, then swim while his strength lasts, and then, if he still hasn't gotten to Aslan's country, he'll sink with his nose toward the sunrise.
    • One of the sailors cheers and says he'll do the same – he won't be outdone by a mouse.
    • Caspian stands up and clarifies that he's not begging the men to come with them. He, Lucy, Edmund, Eustace, Reepicheep, and Drinian are definitely going east. They will take with them the sailors they deem worthy. He's going to ask Drinian and Rhince to consider and then recommend the best men.
    • They take a short break. The sailors walk around the island, and Drinian and Rhince think.
    • Meanwhile Lord Rhoop arrives. He is seated beside his fellow lords, and Ramandu puts him to sleep. As he falls asleep, Rhoop smiles contentedly, relaxing for the first time in years.
    • Caspian's speech has changed the sailors' feelings; now they're all worried they will be left out of the best adventure of them all. Soon everyone but three men wants to go, then everyone but one man, and then he decides to go because he doesn't want to stay behind all alone.
    • Caspian accepts all the sailors except the one who made up his mind last. This man's name is Pittencream. He stays at Aslan's table while the others go on their voyage. The narrator tells us that he feels miserable and left out and that, on the way home after they pick him back up, he deserts the ship. He goes to live in another country, Calormen, and tells lies about his adventures.
    • That night everyone eats the feast at Aslan's Table. In the morning Caspian says goodbye to Ramandu's daughter, and they all (except for Pittencream) sail east.
  • Chapter 15

    The Wonders of the Last Sea

    • As the Dawn Treader continues to sail east, everyone feels different and strange in a good way. The sun is enormous, the light is very bright, and they don't need much sleep. Every morning the singing flock of white birds flies overhead to eat the excess food from Aslan's table, then flies back.
    • Lucy notices that the seawater is unusually clear. As she looks into the sea she sees something small and black moving at the same speed as the ship. When a piece of bread that fell overboard floats across it without colliding, she realizes the black thing is underwater. The black thing becomes enormous for a moment, then goes back to being small.
    • Lucy figures out that the ship has passed over an underwater hill or mountain. The black spot is the ship's shadow, and when the ocean was shallower on top of the hill, the shadow was closer and looked bigger. This means that the water is so clear, she can see to the bottom of the sea.
    • As Lucy studies the sea bed, she notices paths of silver-grey sand running along the bottom through an underwater forest. As the forest ends, the path changes color and is lined with stones. Lucy realizes that it's an underwater road.
    • The road begins to zigzag and get larger, and Lucy understands that it's now going uphill in switchbacks.
    • At the top of the hill, Lucy sees specks moving on the road. They are going to and from a castle or small city made of pearly, ivory-colored material.
    • The narrator tells us that, after they go back to England, Edmund and Lucy decide that the sea-people must build their cities and castles on top of mountains because their topography is the opposite of that on land. On land, the valleys seem nurturing and safe, and the high mountaintops seem distant and dangerous. Underwater, the valleys are dark and cold and have threatening creatures lurking in them, while the mountains in the shallows are warmer, brighter, and more peaceful.
    • The ship passes over the underwater city. Beyond it, Lucy sees fifteen to twenty Sea People riding sea horses.
    • Suddenly a shoal of fat fish swims between Lucy and the Sea People. A different kind of fish that seems fierce swims up from below, grabs one of the fat fish, and dives down again. Lucy realizes that the Sea People are a hunting party. They use the fierce fish like hawks to catch their prey.
    • The Sea People notice the Dawn Treader and swim up to the surface of the water to check it out. They come very close to where Lucy is leaning over the side of the ship. Their bodies are ivory, their hair is dark purple, and they all wear jewelry and coronets. The King of the Sea People shakes his spear at Lucy.
    • Drinian and Edmund come up behind Lucy and ask what she's looking at. She shows them.
    • Drinian tells Lucy and Edmund to turn around with their backs to the sea and look nonchalant. They do, and Lucy asks why. Drinian says that if the sailors saw the Sea People, they might fall in love with the women or the undersea country and jump overboard.
    • Lucy says that when she was a Queen at Cair Paravel, they knew and were friends with the Sea People. (Remember, in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, the Sea People sing at her coronation.) Edmund says that was a different kind – those people could breathe in the air or underwater, while the people they are seeing now can only live underwater.
    • They are interrupted by the sound of a splash and a cry of "Man overboard!" But it's not a man – it's Reepicheep. Drinian curses Reepicheep, not because he's angry but because he's frightened about what might happen to him.
    • Rhince turns the ship around and they go back to the place where Reepicheep went overboard. As they approach to pick him up, they see that he's trying to tell them something.
    • Drinian is worried that Reepicheep is going to tell everyone about the Sea People, so he runs to the side of the ship and uses a rope to haul Reepicheep up himself, waving everyone else away and saying he can handle one mouse on his own.
    • As Reepicheep climbs up the rope, Drinian leans over and whispers to him not to say anything about the Sea People. But Reepicheep doesn't care about them – he's excited because he has discovered that the water is sweet (i.e. fresh instead of salty).
    • Nobody knows why this matters until Reepicheep repeats the prophecy that was spoken over him in his cradle, which says that the place "where the waves grow sweet" is "the utter East" (15.36).
    • Drinian hauls up a bucket of seawater and gives it to Caspian. He confirms that the water is sweet and says it's more like drinking light than water.
    • Lucy also drinks from the bucket. She says it's wonderful and strong and that she won't need to eat now.
    • Everyone on the ship drinks the strange, sweet water. For a long time they are quiet, feeling very strong and healthy. They notice that, although everything is getting brighter (because this world seems to be flat and they are getting closer to the sun), the water has made them able to withstand the bright light.
    • In the evening Drinian wonders aloud how the ship is moving. There is no wind and the sail hangs limp, but the Dawn Treader is still sailing quickly toward the east. Caspian says they must be caught in a strong current.
    • Edmund points out that if this world really is flat, then they might just be poured over the edge of it. This distresses Caspian, but Reepicheep says that's how he's always imagined the end of the world.
    • Drinian asks Reepicheep what he thinks would be waiting for them at the bottom after they plunged over the edge of the world. Reepicheep says that maybe it would be Aslan's country, but maybe it would be an endless fall.
    • Eustace is confused and says the world is round like a ball. Edmund says that just because their world is round doesn't mean that Narnia's is.
    • Caspian is intrigued by the idea of a round world and asks Edmund whether he has been to the places where people are upside down. Edmund says it's not really like that.
  • Chapter 16

    The Very End of the World

    • It turns out that Reepicheep did see the Sea People, and the reason he jumped into the water was because of the Sea King's challenging shake of his spear. However, when he tasted the sweet water, he forgot about them. Before Reepicheep can tell any of the sailors about the Sea People, Drinian warns him to keep quiet.
    • The Dawn Treader is sailing over uninhabited waters now. However, the next morning, Lucy looks into the water and sees a shoal of fish grazing on weeds that grow on the sea bottom, just like flocks of sheep graze on grass.
    • In the middle of the group of fish, Lucy sees a Sea Girl her own age standing with a crook in her hand, acting as a shepherdess – or maybe we should call her a fishherdess.
    • For a moment Lucy and the Sea Girl look into each other's eyes. Somehow, they bond as friends. Then the ship moves on and they are separated.
    • The Dawn Treader glides on for days and days. The light keeps getting brighter, but there is no wind. Nobody on the ship eats or sleeps, and they don't want to. They drink the strange fresh water and they don't talk very much. Everything is very still but also very exciting.
    • One day Caspian asks Drinian what he sees ahead of them. Drinian says he sees whiteness all along the horizon. Caspian says he sees it too and asks what it is. Drinian says it looks like ice, but it's obviously too warm for that.
    • They slow the ship down to avoid crashing into the white barrier. As they get close to it, it seems very smooth and on the same level with the water (it goes left and right but not up). They turn the ship south and row along the edge of it.
    • They discover that the current that has carried them so quickly is only about forty feet wide; the rest of the sea is still. This is good news, because it means it won't be so hard to row their way back to Ramandu's island.
    • They lower the boat, and several people, including Reepicheep, go out to investigate. The people on the ship see the boat go into the whiteness and hear their friends talking about it with surprise. Then the boat comes back, carrying some of the white stuff inside it.
    • Rynelf, who is at the front of the ship in the bows, shouts to Caspian that the white stuff is water lilies!
    • Lucy, in the boat, holds up an armful of lilies to show everyone.
    • Drinian asks Rynelf how deep it is, and Rynelf (who has just taken a "sounding," or depth measurement) says it's three and a half fathoms (about 20 feet). This is surprising, because usually lilies only grow in shallow water.
    • The Dawn Treader sails into the mass of lilies, which they name the Silver Sea. The flowers stretch out around the ship in every direction except behind them, where the ship's passage leaves a strip of glassy green water.
    • For days they sail through the lilies. The whiteness of the lilies and the brightness of the sun combine to make things feel almost overwhelming, but in a good way.
    • They take regular soundings, and after several days the water starts to get shallower. Eventually it gets so shallow that they steer out of the current and row slowly forward. Then they have to stop to prevent the ship from grounding on the bottom of the sea.
    • Caspian orders the boat to be lowered and the men gathered together. Eustace notices that Caspian has a strange look about him.
    • Everyone gathers to hear King Caspian's speech. Caspian tells them that they have fulfilled their quest and found the seven missing lords. He entrusts the ship to Drinian and instructs him to sail back to Narnia. If he doesn't come back, he says, then Trumpkin, who is the Regent, and several other important people have his permission to choose a new King.
    • Drinian interrupts and asks if Caspian is abdicating. Caspian says he is going with Reepicheep to see the end of the world. The sailors are dismayed.
    • Edmund objects, telling Caspian he can't do this. Reepicheep and Drinian also object. Rynelf says that if one of the sailors did the same thing, he would be called a deserter.
    • Caspian insists that he is the King and they are his subjects; they can't tell him what to do. Edmund says that he's not a subject – he's a King of Narnia too, and a more senior one – and he says Caspian can't abandon his people.
    • Reepicheep clarifies, saying that it's not about what Caspian can't do, but what he shall not do. He has a public duty to his country, and he can't just go off and have adventures.
    • Reepicheep also says that, if Caspian won't listen to reason, they'll tie him up and stop him from leaving until he comes to his senses. Edmund agrees, comparing this to the way Ulysses' men tied him up when he heard the song of the Sirens. (See what Shmoop has to say about The Odyssey for more on this.)
    • Lucy reminds Caspian that he promised Ramandu's daughter he would see her again. This does make Caspian pause.
    • Caspian then announces that the quest is ended and everyone will return together. Reepicheep reminds him that he himself must go further east, both to break the spell on the three sleeping lords and to fulfill the prophecy spoken at his birth.
    • Caspian orders Reepicheep to be silent and storms off to his cabin.
    • A little later, the others go to check on Caspian. He is white-faced and teary-eyed. He says that Aslan spoke to him and said that Reepicheep, Edmund, Lucy, and Eustace are to go east while everyone else is to go back.
    • Lucy reminds Caspian that he knew they would have to go back to their own world eventually, and that he'll feel better when he gets back to Ramandu's island.
    • Lucy, Edmund, Eustace, and Reepicheep say goodbye to their friends and set out in the boat, taking Reepicheep's little coracle with them. The Dawn Treader hangs out flags and shields to honor them as they go, then the ship starts rowing back west.
    • The four remaining adventurers sit in the boat and let the current carry them east. They glide all night and all the next day without eating or sleeping. On the third day they see a wall of water around 30 feet high, like a waterfall in reverse.
    • Beyond the wave and the sun, the four of them see an incredibly tall mountain range. Although it's awe-inspiringly high, it has warm green forests and waterfalls instead of snow and ice. A breeze blows toward them from the east. They hear music and smell something wonderful, and they all feel something sublime. They know they are looking at Aslan's country.
    • The boat runs aground. Reepicheep lowers his coracle, throws his sword into the sea, and says goodbye. He gets into the coracle and paddles toward the wave. When he reaches it, the coracle is pulled upward along the wall of water, then it vanishes at the top.
    • The sun rises and the vision of the mountains fades away.
    • Eustace, Edmund, and Lucy get out of the boat and wade south through the water, keeping the backwards waterfall on their right. They don't know why they're doing this; it just seems like the right thing to do.
    • They wade for a long time, holding hands and feeling very childish. Eventually they come to a grassy plain. As they walk along the plain, they realize they are at the place where the sky actually meets the ground, like a bright blue wall.
    • On the grass they see a white lamb. The Lamb invites them to have breakfast and they see a fire with fish roasting over it. They eat hungrily.
    • Lucy asks the Lamb if this is the way to Aslan's country. The Lamb says that, for them, the way to Aslan's country is through their own world.
    • As the lamb talks, telling them there is a way to his country from every world, he transforms into the golden lion, Aslan.
    • Lucy asks Aslan to tell them the way to his country from their own world. He says he will be telling them all the time, but he won't say whether the road is long or short.
    • Aslan says he will open a door in the sky and send them home. Lucy asks whether they will ever return to Narnia, and Aslan says Lucy and Edmund are too old and must focus on getting to know him in their own world. Aslan says he is in that other world, but under another name. (What name, you ask? Let's just say his initials are J.C. See the "Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory" section for more.)
    • Lucy asks whether Eustace will come back to Narnia. Aslan says she doesn't need to know.
    • Aslan tears the blue wall of the sky open, revealing a bright white light. He kisses them all goodbye, then they find themselves back in Lucy's room at her Aunt Alberta's house.
    • The narrator tells us that Caspian and his men returned safely to Ramandu's island, the three sleeping lords woke, and Caspian married Ramandu's daughter. (That's a lot of plot for one paragraph!)
    • Back in England, everyone notices how much Eustace has changed for the better.