Study Guide

Witch and Wizard Chapters 36-40

By James Patterson and Gabrielle Charbonnet

Chapters 36-40

Chapter 36

  • Okay, so Whit's reporting from inside the wall. It's a hazy shadow world, and everything's fuzzy.
  • He hears Wisty freaking out on the other side of the wall so he tells her to chill.
  • A shadow figure seems to hear his voice and turns toward Whit. It's Celia.

Chapter 37

  • Whit is trying to get Celia's attention. It takes a minute, but she finally notices him.
  • Celia asks Whit where he is. He explains he's inside the cell wall like it ain't no thing.
  • Celia tells Whit he has to leave immediately, though. Oh, and by the way, she's a ghost—she was murdered in the mental hospital.

Chapter 38

  • Wisty manages to pull Whit out of the wall. Whit tries to get back inside the wall, but to no avail.
  • Whit tells his sister he saw Celia, and, understandably, Wisty is confused.
  • Someone's at the door again. This seems to be a recurring theme.

Chapter 39

  • Wouldn't you know, the person at the door is the Matron. Surprise: The witch and the wizard are to have another day in court.
  • They say their sweet goodbyes.
  • Whit and Wisty hop in the van for a ride to the court; it smells like blood. That's always a sign of good things to come, right?
  • They are taken to the courtroom and have an unhappy reunion with Judge Ezekiel Unger and the Visitor.
  • The One Who Judges is reviewing the kids' medical reports. Much to his surprise, the results are all normal. Wisty's super relieved—maybe this whole thing was a terrible mistake.
  • Newsflash: It wasn't. The judge wants to know who the kids' bribed to tamper with the results. He suspects it was the Visitor.

Chapter 40

  • Wisty assures the judge that she and her brother did not bribe the Visitor, but the judge seems unconvinced.
  • Whit offers a practical defense: What on earth would they even bribe someone with? Their only possessions are the journal, the drumstick, and gruel.
  • Wisty wishes she could turn the judge into a cockroach. Shmoop wonders why she wouldn't want to turn her enemy into something nicer, like a golden retriever.
  • Apropos of nothing, Wisty remembers a rhyme from her childhood. It's about flies and includes the phrase "lawsy mawsy," whatever that means.
  • The lawsy mawsy chant seems to have conjured a plague of horseflies? Gross.

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