Study Guide

Thor Quotes

  • Power

    ODIN: Whosoever holds this hammer, if he be worthy, shall possess the power of Thor!

    You always gotta read the fine print. Thor has some pretty massive power, but he need to earn it if he wants to use it.

    THOR: As king of Asgard-

    ODIN: But you're NOT KING! Not yet

    A little smackdown from Dad here. Thor's been named heir and thinks that he's able to do as he likes: like marching on the frost giants and cracking some skulls. Odin, older, wiser and begs to differ.

    It's also important that Loki's present for Thor's little temper tantrum. He says nothing. He just watches and listens. He's not nearly as powerful as Thor, but as we learn, he ends up holding a lot more power.

    ODIN: The mighty hammer Mjolnir, forged in the heart of a dying star. Its power has no equal, as a weapon to destroy or as a tool to build. It is a fit companion for a king.

    There's no question that Mjolnir has power, and Thor being Thor, is the guy who gets to use it. But Odin points out something really important here: the power of the hammer isn't automatically good or evil. Thor's choice of how he uses it that determines whether he deserves that power or not.

    HEIMDALL: Never has an enemy slipped my watch until this day. I wish to know how that happened.

    Proof that even gods in this universe are not all-powerful. Heimdall's found the limits of his power…and he's not at all happy about it.

    LAUFEY: We are beyond diplomacy now, Allfather. He'll get what he came for: war and death.

    ODIN: So be it.

    You can be a god, complete with an eight-legged horse and a rainbow bridge and snazzy laser spears. But not even all that cool stuff can stop a war if other forces want it badly enough. It's a quiet reminder that real power comes from places that not even gods can control.

    ODIN: Thor Odinson, you have disobeyed the express command of your King. Through your arrogance and stupidity, you have opened these peaceful Realms and innocent lives to the horrors of war. You are unworthy of this Realm, unworthy of the loved ones you've betrayed. I hereby take from you your powers. In the name of my father, and of his father before, I cast you out!

    And you thought being denied phone privileges was tough. When you send a god to his room to think about what he's done, you've gotta bring out the big guns… which naturally means leading it off with a big showy speech.

    JANE: Years of research… gone.

    DARCY: They even took my iPod.

    ERIK: What about the back-ups?

    JANE: They took our back-ups. They took the back-ups of our back-ups. They were extremely thorough.

    SHIELD represents power of an entirely different sort here: government power, and the ability to exert control over individuals in the name of safety. They're very Big Brother here (though they are ultimately the good guys…sort of), which eventually comes up against the cosmic power of Thor.

    SIF: My king, we would ask that you end Thor's banishment.

    LOKI: My first command cannot be to unto the Allfather's last. We're on the brink of war with Jotunheim. Our people need a sense of continuity in order to feel safe in these difficult times.

    This is a politician's lie and it speaks to both the nature and the constraints of power. Ostensibly, he's right, which suggest that his new power as King of Asgard has limits. But in reality, he's doing exactly, precisely what he wants. He's just got some slick political lies to make it all go down smooth.

    THOR: Your ancestors called it magic and you call it science. I come from a place where they're one and the same.

    Power in this case means knowledge. But it also holds out hope: saying that we too can understand this power if we do our homework long enough (and cease our warlike ways).

    LOKI: Look at you! The mighty Thor! With all your strength! But what good does it do you now? Do you hear me brother? There's nothing you can do!

    Once again, Loki shows us that power means more than a mean swing with the Space Hammer. Thor getting what he wants means flexing muscles in subtle arenas: social interactions, legal authority and simply being outfoxed by someone thinking several moves ahead of you. Naturally Thor finds a way to bash his way through anyway. But the principle remains the same.

  • Jealousy

    THOR: As king of Asgard...!

    ODIN: But you're not king! Not yet.

    This is perhaps the greatest sign that Thor's getting a little too big for his britches. He goes on and on about how awesome his dad was for kicking frost giant butt, and figures this time it's going to be hit turn. But as Odin warns him, that power isn't his yet… and frankly Thor may be getting a little green-eyed staring at it for so long.

    LOKI: You could have told me what I was from the beginning! Why didn't you?

    ODIN: You're my son... I wanted only to protect you from the truth...

    LOKI: What, because I... I... I am the monster parents tell their children about at night?

    Loki isn't listening to what Odin's telling him. Instead, he's filling in his own details, something that strengthens his jealousy and plays into thinking of himself as a victim.

    ODIN: You are a vain, greedy, cruel boy!

    THOR: And you are an old man and a fool!

    Whoa. Looks like Loki's not the only one with a little case of the green-eyed meanies. Thor's kind of eyeing that throne of his dad's a little too much for comfort…

    AGENT CALE: Is that one of Stark's?

    AGENT COULSON: I don't know. Guy never tells me anything.

    This one's a shout-out to the greater Marvel Universe. "Stark" is Tony Stark of course—Iron Man—whom Coulson has deal with on two occasions before and who clearly is privy to info that Coulson isn't. That makes him a little jealous of Stark's position: the fact that Stark clearly is higher up the food chain that he.

    LOKI: You know, it all makes sense now, why you favored Thor all these years, because no matter how much you claim to love me, you could never have a frost giant sitting on the throne of Asgard!

    And there it is in a nutshell: for all of Loki's aspirations to rule, for all his sinister schemes, he's pretty much doing what he does because daddy doesn't love him best. We'd laugh…but there are more than a few real-world politicians who never outgrew their playground stage either.

    LAUFEY: So you're the one who showed us the way into Asgard.

    LOKI: That was just a bit of fun, really. To ruin my brother's big day, and to protect the realm from his idiotic rule for a while longer.

    Loki lies to Laufey a lot, but we're pretty sure he's telling the truth here. Which means that Loki's jealousy has enough of a hold on him to make him do truly dangerous things— like let frost giants into an arsenal— just to get even.

    LOKI: I never wanted the throne, I only ever wanted to be your equal!

    From first frame to last, Loki is consumed by jealousy. Not just jealousy that Thor is the first-born, but that he's going to be the heir of Asgard…something Loki thinks he's terrifyingly unqualified for. And yet Thor's still the apple of Odin's eye, something Loki desperately wants and can never have. It's enough to give you a case of the Resentful Glares, that's for sure.

    THOR: Why have you done this?

    LOKI: To prove to Father that I am a worthy son! When he wakes, I will have saved his life, I will have destroyed that race of monsters, and I will be true heir to the throne!

    Seen by the cold light of day, this is actually really sad. Loki feels so absolutely inadequate that he has to commit genocide in order to prove that he's worth dad's attention. We'd hate to think what would happen if he ever got cut from the football team…

    THOR: Loki, this is madness!

    LOKI: Is it madness? Is it? Is it? I don't know what happened on Earth to make you so soft! Don't tell me it was that woman? Oh, it was. Well maybe, when we're done here, I'll pay her a visit myself!

    Obviously, Loki's not jealous of Jane. But he is jealous of Thor's favored status, and with the delicate stuff set aside, he's willing to go for the obvious target to get a rise out of his brother. (Though that might not be wise: have you seen Thor when he's mad?)

    LOKI: Look at you. The mighty Thor! With all your strength! And what good does it do you now? Do you hear me, brother? There's nothing you can do!

    Actually, there is, but even now, the villain's got something to prove. Seriously Loki, grow up! (And lay off the sarcasm, huh?)

  • Humility

    THOR: When I am king, I'll hunt the monsters down and slay them all! Just as you did father.

    It's telling that Thor would say this as a kid: it's something a kid would say. Thing is, grown-up Thor pretty much says the same thing… and boy howdy is that a problem.

    THOR: I have no plans to die today.

    HEIMDALL: None do.

    Just a friendly word that Thor may be biting off more than he can chew, and maybe toning down the swagger a little bit would be in everyone's best interests.

    THOR: You dare threaten Thor with so puny—

    (Darcy tasers him and he collapses.)

    DARCY: What? He was freaking me out!

    Nothing makes a character look humble like being the butt of the joke. The audience gets a big laugh here at the sight of big bad Thor getting taken down by little ole Darcy. It also shows us what Thor has to learn, as a handy signpost to show us where the movie is going.

    LAUFEY: Your father is a murderer and a thief! And why have you come, to talk of peace? You long for battle, you crave it! You're nothing more than a boy trying to prove himself a man!

    THOR: Be warned, this boy grows tired of your mockery!

    Better ease up on the snarking there, Thor. In his own twisted way, Laufey's trying to teach him something—you can't just bash your way out of every problem—but Thor just can't seem to get it.

    THOR: Why did you bring us back?

    ODIN: Do you realize what you've done, what you've started?

    THOR: I was protecting my throne!

    ODIN: You cannot even defend your friends! How can you hope to protect the kingdom?

    Thor's lack of humility keeps him from looking at the big picture here. Sometimes, you gotta swallow your pride in order to be the better king – and keep more people safe.

    ODIN: Thor Odinson... you have betrayed the express command of your king. Through your arrogance and stupidity, you've opened these peaceful realms and innocent lives to the horror and desolation of war! You are unworthy of these realms, you're unworthy of your title, you're unworthy... of the loved ones you have betrayed! I now take from you your power! In the name of my father and his father before, I, Odin Allfather, cast you out!

    Odin makes it very clear what Thor needs, and more importantly, he explains specifically why. Thor can't pretend he doesn't know why his dad is cranky.

    THOR: I had it all backwards. I had it all wrong.

    ERIK: It's not a bad thing finding out that you don't have all the answers. You start asking the right questions.

    THOR: For the first time in my life, I have no idea what I'm supposed to do.

    EIRK: Anyone who's ever going to find his way in this world has to start by admitting he doesn't know where the hell he is.

    There's wisdom in humility. It makes you see the spots where you made mistakes and helps you be a better person. It took a lot for Thor to get here, but it sounds like he finally made it.

    LOKI: Look at you. The mighty Thor! With all your strength! And what good does it do you now? Do you hear me, brother? There's nothing you can do!

    The problem with Loki here is that he doesn't understand that Thor has truly changed. It isn't his strength that Loki should worry about: it's his willingness to cut himself off from Jane rather than let a whole planet get wiped out.

    LOKI: I could have done it, Father! I could have done it! For you! For all of us!

    Someone wasn't paying attention when Thor went through all that personal growth, was he? Into the cosmic drainpipe with you, Loki. You can come back when The Avengers get here…and we'll see if you learned anything about humility.

    ODIN: You will be a wise king.

    THOR: There will never be a wiser king than you… or a better father. I have much to learn. I know that now. Someday, perhaps, I shall make you proud.

    That's what we're talking about Thor. Feels good to give credit to someone else, doesn't it?

  • Sacrifice

    ODIN: Humanity would not face this threat alone. Our armies drove the frost giants back into the heart of their own world. The cost was great. In the end, their king fell, and the source of their power was taken from them.

    Stop and think about this for a minute: the Asgardians live for thousands of years. They're practically immortal and their world is a paradise. Yet they put it all on the line to save the Earth, at a time when we were bashing each other on the head with clubs and setting enemies on fire because we thought it was fun. Why? Because they believed in our potential and were willing to give up everything to protect it. That's the kind of sacrifice Thor hasn't figured out yet.

    FRIGGA: He kept the truth from you so you would never feel different. You are our son, Loki. And we your family.

    Way to go Mom. She's speaking the words here that Loki needs to hear: Odin made a sacrifice to help Loki as a child, and Loki needs to remember that.

    THOR: My friends, I'm just a man. I'll only get in the way or worse: get one of you killed. But I can help get these people to safety.

    Atta boy. This is the first time we see Thor acting in a truly selfless manner: not for his glory or the general thrill of bashing people with a giant hammer, but stepping in harm's way to get some innocent people out of it.

    THOR: Sif, you have done all you can!

    SIF: No! I will die a warrior's death! Stories will be told of this day!

    THOR: Live, and tell those stories yourself!

    Thor's pretty much figured it out by now. His job is not to bash the bad guys until they stop twitching, but to protect those who can't protect themselves. In this case, it's Sif: who can darn well take care of herself, but who's hit a bit of a wall when it comes to the Destroyer.

    SIF: My King, we would ask that you end Thor's banishment.

    LOKI: My first command cannot be to undo the Allfather's last. We're on the brink of war with Jotunheim. Our people need a sense of continuity, in order to feel safe in these difficult times. All of us must stand together, for the good of Asgard.

    Here's where the whole sacrifice thing gets put to the test. Loki sounds awfully convincing here, with the "greater good of Asgard" and all. But seriously: he doesn't want Thor back and he's not particularly interested in keeping up with whatever Odin was doing. It's not a sacrifice it you're not actually giving anything up.

    ERIK: I've seen the way she looks at you.

    THOR: I swear to you, I mean her no harm.

    ERIK: Good. In that case, I'll buy you another round, and you'll leave town tonight.

    Thor doesn't end up leaving, but we're pretty sure he would have given up Jane (and a shot at returning home) in order to keep her safe. It's an important moment because it's the first time he's thought about someone other than himself.

    HOGUN: We must go. We must find Thor.

    FANDRAL: You speak of treason!

    VOLSTAGG: Forget treason, it's suicide!

    SIF: Thor would do the same for us.

    Unlike Thor, the Sidekick Squad doesn't need to be banished to Earth in order to lay it on the line for a buddy. That's the key difference between them and Thor in Jotunheim: here's there to prove a point, but they're there as a way of backing their friend.

    THOR: Brother, however I have wronged you, whatever I have done that has led you to do this, I am truly sorry. But these people are innocent: taking their lives will gain you nothing. So take mine, and end this.

    And that's the moment when he becomes a hero: making the ultimate sacrifice for others when he could just as easily run away. Took you long enough, Thor.

    LOKI: What are you doing? If you destroy the Bridge, you'll never see her again!

    THOR: Forgive me, Jane!

    Just to be sure the big guy puts his money where his mouth is, he has to cut himself off from the girl he loves in order to save innocent lives… innocent frost giant lives, just so we're absolutely clear.

    THOR: So Earth is lost to us.

    HEIMDALL: No. There is always hope.

    Hope indeed. Guess we'll have to wait until The Avengers to see if Thor has any other opportunities for sacrifice.

  • Morality and Ethics

    ODIN: With the last great war ended, we withdrew from the other worlds and returned home at the Realm Eternal, Asgard. And here we remain as the beacon of hope, shining out across the stars. And though we have fallen into man's myths and legends, it was Asgard and its warriors that brought peace to the universe. But the day will come, when one of you will have to defend that peace.

    Odin's very clear from the beginning what's expected of Thor and Loki: keep this place safe, because war and horror really stink. They can't say that they don't know how to behave properly.

    THOR: When I am king, I'll hunt the monsters down and slay them all! Just as you did, Father!

    ODIN: A wise king never seeks out war. But he must always be ready for it.

    Again, Thor can't claim he doesn't know how to do the right thing. Odin spells it all out for him.

    HEIMDALL: Be warned, I shall uphold my sacred oath to protect this realm as its gatekeeper. If your return threatens the safety of Asgard, my gate will remain shut and you will be left to perish on the cold waste of Jotunheim.

    Heimdall, at least, hasn't taken his eye off the ball. Here he spells out his personal ethics—duty before everything—and has the courtesy to let the others know what that means for them. Nice of him to do that.

    THOR: The Jotuns must learn to fear me just as they fear you.

    ODIN: That's pride and vanity talking, not leadership!

    Again with the rules spelled out. Odin correctly points out that ending the threat of the frost giants means more than just bashing them on the head. Thor needs to learn that before he can rule.

    LOKI: Why? You were knee-deep in Jotun blood. Why would you take me?

    ODIN: You were an innocent child.

    LOKI: No. You took me for a purpose. What was it? Tell me!

    ODIN: I thought we could unite our kingdoms one day. Bring about an alliance, bring about permanent peace... through you.

    Loki really doesn't understand why Odin would do what he did. The thought of some greater good being served by taking a baby from a battlefield is truly beyond him. That, at the end of the day, is why he's the bad guy.

    THOR: Once I have Mjolnir, I will return the items they stole from you.

    Another ethical misstep here, even though Thor is ultimately trying to do the right thing. He sees getting his power back as the main goal, with Jane's stolen notes as an afterthought.

    LOKI: I will conceal you, and a handful of your soldiers, lead you into Odin's chambers and you can slay him where he lies.

    LAUFEY: Why not kill him yourself?

    LOKI: I suspect that the Asgardians would not take kindly to a king who had murdered his predecessor.

    This is typical bad guy stuff, and we can't say we're surprised. But sneaky cuts both ways, and in this case, it's more compacted than that. Loki isn't trying to betray Odin: he's setting up Laufey, as a way of weakening Asgard's enemies. In his own sick way, he's doing the right thing: the thing Thor originally wanted to do. And if Thor hadn't caught wise at just the right time, he likely would have made it happen…

    HEIMDALL: You would defy the commands of Loki, our king? Break every oath you have taken as warriors, and commit treason to bring Thor back?

    SIF: Yes.

    HEIMDALL: Good.

    Heimdall, stickler for the rules, is able to eel around his rigid ethics system in order to do the right thing. It's interesting the ways he sticks to the letter of his duty while ignoring the spirit…suggesting that he still won't break his word to help Thor. He's just found a way around it.

    ERIK: I still don't think you're the god of thunder. But you ought to be.

    Erik's first admission that Thor might actually be a better guy than he first thought is important, since it happens at the same time as Thor's moral awakening. It suggests, very subtly, that Thor always had the capacity to be a hero in him. He just needed a swift kick in the rear to bring it up.

    FRIGGA: There's always a purpose to everything your father does.

    Thor bashes without thinking. Odin bashes only after his son is completely out of control…and then only as a way of showing him the error of his ways. That's the difference between good judgment and a temper tantrum.

  • Exile

    ODIN: Thor Odinson...you have betrayed the express command of your king. Through your arrogance and stupidity, you've opened these peaceful realms and innocent lives to the horror and desolation of war! You are unworthy of these realms, you're unworthy of your title, you're unworthy... of the loved ones you have betrayed! I now take from you your power! In the name of my father and his father before, I, Odin Allfather, cast you out!

    If you're going to exile someone, this is the way to do it: thundering shouts followed by a blaze of special effects. And Thor still doesn't seem to get it.

    LOKI: You know, it all makes sense now, why you favored Thor all these years, because no matter how much you claim to love me, you could never have a frost giant sitting on the throne of Asgard!

    In some ways, Loki has always been exiled. He is a frost giant, after all, and he never quite fits in in Asgard. Exile doesn't need to be physical: it can be spiritual too.

    THOR: Can I come home?

    LOKI: The truce with Jotunheim is conditional upon your exile.

    THOR: Yes, but couldn't we find a way?

    LOKI: Your mother has forbidden your return.

    Okay, so Loki's being a lying liar from Liarsville here. But as self-serving as they are, his lies actually serve some good. He's forcing Thor to accept his exile, and in so doing, allow Thor to take responsibility for what he's done. That's the first step to becoming a better man…something Thor needs to do if he ever wants to come home.

    LOKI: This is good-bye brother. I'm so sorry.

    THOR: No, I am sorry. Thank you for coming here.

    Thor accepts his exile forever: meaning that he understands that he did this to himself and accepts the consequences. Way to be a grown-up, Thor!

    LOKI: What hope is there for Thor?

    FRIGGA: There's always a purpose to everything your father does.

    That's the sliver of a way out for Thor, meaning that if he figures out why Odin did this, he might be able to end his exile.

    THOR: You know I can't go home. My father is dead because of me, and I must remain in exile.

    SIF: Thor, your father still lives.

    Even though the whole "Odin's dead" thing is a lie, it's important for Thor to accept responsibility for his exile. I did it, I have no excuse, and I'm prepared to stay in this little Podunk world in order to pay the check.

    THOR: You must return to Asgard. You have to stop Loki.

    Thor's acceptance of his exile extends even to the fact that Asgard is in danger. That's dedication.

    THOR: You can't kill an entire race!

    LOKI: Why not? And what is this newfound love for the frost giants? You, could have killed them all with your bare hands!

    THOR: I've changed.

    This is important, because it means that Thor's exile serves a purpose beyond punishment. It's a learning tool…which Odin probably intended all along.

    LOKI: I could have done it, Father! I could have done it! For you! For all of us!

    ODIN: No, Loki.

    In many ways, this is Loki stepping into exile as well: abandoning his home for the void of space. He's doing so voluntarily…though he doesn't intend to stay in exile for long.

    THOR: So Earth is lost to us.

    HEIMDALL: No. There is always hope.

    Just a quiet reminder that exile need not be forever…not as long as there are sequels to be made.