Analyzing Primary Sources: Seeing Images

In this video, learn about reading and understanding images inside a primary document.

HumanitiesAnalyzing Primary Sources

Transcript

00:23

give us details that writing cannot give us So you

00:27

know let's go back to that civil war diary Someone's

00:30

you know writing they like watched all this violence and

00:33

like all these terrible things happen Ball block maybe big

00:35

picture things Maybe they're talking about their emotions but pictures

00:38

we get to see like super mundane details of life

00:42

that someone might not think were worth writing down I

00:44

had my you know coffee and doughnut this morning But

00:48

then you're looking at the painting for sculpture whatever and

00:51

someone's drinking coffee and eating a doughnut eh So we

00:54

now know what people ate and drank it that time

00:57

So these kinds of mundane details tend to come out

00:59

more and paintings and in in in imagery than they

01:02

do in writing But at the same time they might

01:06

flying you know there's anachronistic things things that you know

01:09

People put in a painting that weren't actually happening And

01:11

at that time another reason images are great Primary sources

01:15

is because they kind of tend tio create more emotion

01:18

in the in the viewer people tend to be really

01:21

moved by art on by images maybe more than by

01:26

words even s o They can kind of bring us

01:28

back to a specific feeling that someone might have might

01:31

have had at the time Oh one last thing is

01:35

that language is in a barrier with images We talked

01:37

about this with writing I can't read ancient you know

01:39

aramaic but i can interpret a kn image maybe not

01:42

perfectly because i wasn't there during that time but i

01:45

don't need to be able to speak a certain language

01:46

to interpret it could be a picture of an aramaic

01:49

uh java code or something and be able to tackle

01:53

the brilliance of his coat when our images a bad

01:58

thing like winter they misleading what we do with photo

02:01

shop Now people have been doing with images forever so

02:05

you know painters sculptors would actually lie with their art

02:09

and you know the same way you have biases and

02:11

writing You can have biases and images that doesn't change

02:14

it all What you can do is compare a bunch

02:15

of images from the same time period if every single

02:19

woman who was painted at that time looks exactly the

02:20

same Probably not Every single woman who's painted that time

02:24

looks exactly the same Probably it was just like the

02:26

style and that's how it was that's Interesting in and

02:28

of itself But you do Have to be careful You

02:31

don't want to say like all women were blonde in

02:33

you know sixteen seventy two when you know that just

02:35

might be how they were how they were painting it

02:37

And then of course we also have to remember that

02:39

images just don't usually last very well They're not preserved

02:43

well it's much easier to preserve you know something that

02:47

was written than ah painting like you don't go into

02:50

museum and like there's like so so many protections over

02:53

painting Son camp Beyond this can't be on and that's

02:55

because they give someone touches it it gets destroyed so

02:58

preserving documents written documents is also an issue But like

03:01

once you digitized that you know the words of the

03:04

words where is with an image to really get you

03:07

know the the richness of the image you you just

03:11

can't Why use an image as a primary resource What

03:18

are the differences from tech sources Can images be biased

03:23

How can you tell if they are wire imagesmore scarce 00:03:27.516 --> [endTime] than text sources