AP English Language and Composition 3.10 Passage Drill

AP English Language and Composition 3.10 Passage Drill. Which of the following devices does the passage not include?

APAP English Language and Composition
AP English Language and CompositionPassage Drill
Purpose, Rhetoric, Style, and Organization
English I EOC AssessmentNon-linear Plot Development
Rhetorical Function, Strategy, and PurposeRhetorical Strategies and Devices
Test PrepAP English Language and Composition

Transcript

00:16

And how many times have we skimmed this?

00:20

[ mumbles ]

00:27

Okay, let's just get to it.

00:29

Which of the following devices does the passage

00:31

not include? [sound of a baby laughing]

00:33

We're not seeing an iPhone 6 here.

00:35

[ mumbles ]

00:38

Okay, let's get to it.

00:40

All right, well, the only thing to do here is go down the list

00:42

and root through the passage to see what we find. [Man in the farm, holding a plant root]

00:45

Choice B says that the passage doesn't exaggerate.

00:49

Huh. Well, the author might agree for the most part because he's just that hardcore about science. [Woman describing the size of a spider to a man]

00:54

The bit about water crystallizing into stars is

00:56

an exaggeration, though. Like our closest star, the sun,

00:59

the other stars out there are fiery balls of exploding atoms.

01:04

Like that.

01:05

If the author isn't intentionally exaggerating here, well, then Like that.

01:05

If the author isn't intentionally exaggerating here, well, then

01:08

he doesn't know his science as well as he should.

01:10

Option C claims that there aren't any analogies in the passage, [Man disgusted after seeing the spider]

01:13

but we have to disagree.

01:15

An analogy is a comparison of two things that are somehow similar.

01:20

So how about when Professor Huxley equates the necessity of learning about science

01:24

to the necessity of learning about chess?

01:26

All in a world where our lives depend on winning a game of it. [A professor writing something on the blackboard]

01:30

Yep, the Hux gives us a big, whopping analogy, so that makes

01:33

C a no-go.

01:35

And then we have answer D, which clearly misses the fact

01:37

that the passage is chock-full of metaphors.

01:40

Our favorite is when "our perturbed minds" are

01:43

compared to "dark waters." [image of a brain, dark water and a tornado]

01:46

But, maybe that's because we're a little bit twisted.

01:48

Yeah, welcome to Shmoop.

01:50

All right, choice E tries to convince us that the passage has

01:52

no reiteration.

01:54

Seriously, E?

01:55

This passage is continually repeating itself.

01:58

If we really wanted to boil it down, it'd read like this: [image of water boiling]

02:00

"Science is awesome. Really awesome.

02:02

Science is so, so, really awesome."

02:05

All right, well, the best answer is A.

02:06

A counterargument is an argument or set of ideas that

02:09

opposes another argument or set of ideas.

02:12

Using a counterargument in an essay can be a good thing.

02:15

Pointing out where the other side may be right gives us a great

02:18

chance to show exactly why we're more right [woman arguing with her husband while lying on a sunbed]

02:21

than the other side.

02:22

However, it seems like nobody ever told the author of this passage [Crackers bursting in the sky]

02:25

about the joys of counterarguments.

02:27

He never makes the case for why science might lead to bad things. [someone performing an experiment and it explodes]

02:31

Guess he never read Frankenstein.