AP English Literature and Composition 1.2 Passage Drill 5

AP English Literature and Composition 1.2 Passage Drill 5. What is being personified?

AP English Literature and CompositionImagery and Figurative Language
Passage Drill
Passage Drill 5
EnglishImagery and Figurative Language
Imagery and Figurative LanguageIdentifying uses of figurative language
LanguageEnglish Language
Product TypeAP English Literature

Transcript

00:28

Yeah, any time we're faced with a personification question, we're pretty much playing Dr. Frankenstein.

00:33

There's something in this poem that is NOT a person, but the author is treating it as

00:37

if it IS one.

00:38

Let's go through our answer choices and see how everything shakes out...

00:41

Is "might" being personified?

00:44

Well, it... might. In this case, we're talking about the "power" version of might, not the... "maybe" kind.

00:50

The author does call Death "mighty and dreadful" on line 2...

00:53

...but, we just kinda answered our own question.

00:56

He's using "might" to describe something... so he's not making it a person.

01:00

What about pride?

01:01

Once again, we won't find the exact word, but we will find a form of it...

01:05

...right out of the gate, the poem reads: Death, be not proud...

01:08

But again, pride is used as a descriptor here -- not as a person.

01:12

C -- Death?

01:13

Yup. As often as we've seen Death depicted as the tall creepy guy holding gardening equipment...

01:19

...it isn't actually a real person. So, when the poem keeps referring to death like it's

01:22

a living, breathing dude -- how ironic... the author is personifying it.

01:27

Sleep and Pleasure, while mentioned, are also bogus answers.

01:30

C's our guy.

01:32

Not that... C is an actual guy...