College Tour: New York University

If you're looking for a big school experience at one of the highest-ranked national universities, NYU might be your cup of tea. Then again, if you're really into cups of tea, Oxford might be more your style.

College and CareerCollege 101
LanguageEnglish Language

Transcript

00:26

And here are our potential answers.

00:28

Well, just like the spectators at a sporting event, spectator ions are key components. [Spectators watching a sporting game]

00:33

And just like the spectators at a sporting event, spectator ions don’t get to participate. [Ions on a football field]

00:38

When we write out a chemical reaction, spectator ions will appear on both sides, unchanged.

00:43

We need to examine this neutralization reaction in more detail so we can figure out who the

00:47

spectators are.

00:49

Unfortunately, these ones don’t identify themselves with foam fingers and face paint. [Spectator ions scribbled out]

00:54

The first thing we need to do is identify the stronger acid or base.

00:58

This species will dissociate completely and allow the neutralization reaction to proceed. [Acid and base stood side by side]

01:03

You probably don’t recognize acetic acid, CH3 CO OH, as an especially strong acid,

01:11

but hopefully you do recognize sodium hydroxide, NA OH, as a strong base. [NaOH dancing in a club]

01:16

If not, it’d probably be a good idea to review your list of strong bases.

01:22

Anyway, sodium hydroxide will completely dissociate in water, producing Na+ and OH-

01:28

ions.

01:29

The OH- will take a proton from the acid, CH3 CO OH, and the overall reaction will yield [OH- taking a proton from an acid]

01:36

water and sodium acetate, as a salt.

01:39

This salt will dissociate in water. [Salt poured into a beaker]

01:41

Get all that?

01:42

Now let’s write this reaction in terms of ions for those species that dissociate.

01:47

So who are the spectators?

01:48

Well, we can identify spectators based on their lack of participation in this reaction.

01:53

The only ion that appears on both sides of the reaction, unchanged, is the sodium ion, [Sodium ions in reaction circled]

01:58

Na+, making our answer D. Now that was well worth watching, wasn’t

02:02

it?

02:03

What can we say?

02:04

We here at Shmoop like to put on a show. [People dancing in a street talent show]

02:05

…we just hope someone will come watch our tap routine next time.