ELA 11: 3.1 Gothic-Romanticism

American LiteratureAll American Literature
CoursesAmerican Literature
LanguageEnglish Language
LiteratureAmerican Literature

Transcript

00:25

guys and gals were English. Yeah England's a romantic place you know [English flag]

00:29

must be all the bangers and mash. (Laughing) While there were romantics on the other [Man wearing a bowler hat holding plates of bangers and mash]

00:33

side of the pond the most famous American authors of this genre were

00:37

different from their English brethren in that they liked to paint their [Weirdly dressed man in front of the US flag]

00:41

fingernails black and brood to the tunes of My Chemical Romance. [Someone painting their fingernails black in front of a typewriter]

00:46

See these guys weren't just romantics, they were Gothic romantics.

00:51

Well how is Gothic Romanticism different from Romanticism?

00:55

Well romanticism was a movement that rebelled against the enlightenment and [A couple bungee jumping together]

00:59

its tendency to value reason above all else. Emotion was the name of the game

01:04

for the romantics and horror and dread in particular were the emotional

01:08

bread-and-butter of the Gothic romantics. Well why not, fear is an emotion. The [Gothic man holding a loaf of bread that says horror and butter that says dread]

01:13

gothic novels of American writers like Edgar Allan Poe were essentially scary

01:17

stories replete with creepy settings and supernatural murder mad forces. [Ghost of a woman holding a bloody knife floating around]

01:24

In fact Gothic Romantic authors paid so much attention to their

01:28

settings that the settings tended to become characters in their own right, [Gothic house looking angry]

01:32

which explains why we feel the way we do about the House of Usher. In short we're

01:37

not going to do a book weekend getaway there. Yeah, different Usher... [The singer 'Usher' stood in front of the house of Usher]

01:42

You've probably read a gothic romantic story or two and not realized it [Boy reading a book]

01:46

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving

01:49

yeah well it's got the Headless Horseman a ghost who likes to show up out of

01:53

nowhere and scare the bejesus out of skinny schoolteachers and it's set in a [Scared looking woman]

01:57

secluded village with a long history of witches, wizards and ghosts. [A wizard a witch and a ghost]

02:02

And what about Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter well in that novel we

02:06

have a minister Arthur Dimmesdale who's so tortured by the fact that he slept [Minister pacing around a church]

02:11

with Hester Prynne yeah sorry that was a spoiler alert, that he

02:14

essentially dies of guilt, poor guy. Getting annihilated by your darker [Minister falls over and dies]

02:18

emotions is a clear hallmark of a good gothic romantic tale or a bad Lars von [The Grim Reaper chasing after a man]

02:24

Trier film all right pal just keepin it real.

02:26

We've already mentioned Edgar Allan Poe but really he was so good at his

02:30

genre that he's worth mentioning again. Poe poe poe poe poe! He wrote the Cask of [Picture of Poe]

02:34

Amontillado, where the narrator walled the guy off in a dungeon. [Man disappears behind a wall]

02:38

He wrote the mask of the Red Death where a ton of people at a party drop dead of

02:42

the plague, he wrote the tell-tale heart where a murderer confesses because he

02:47

thinks he can still hear his victims heart beating, turns out it was just the [Man confessing to a police officer and rocking back and forth]

02:51

ringtone on his iPhone, how embarrassing. Anyway so grab your candle, a spare pair

02:56

of undies and your sense of self-preservation it's about to get [Woman looking scared holding a candle and pants]

03:00

gloomy up in here. [Scary looking skeleton face]