ELA 11: 5.3 Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass? He's basically the Captain America of the Social Justice League... Yeah, that's a thing, don't question it.

19th-Century Literature19th-Century American Literature
American Literature19th-Century American Literature
All American Literature
LanguageEnglish Language
LiteratureAmerican Literature

Transcript

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learn to read, and he got to hear a lot about abolition. But then, Douglas was

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hired out to work on a farm owned by a man named Edward Covey, also known as... [Douglass goes to farm]

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what's his name? Oh yes, Satan. Well, that was his name among locals, anyway. Douglass was [picture of whipped man]

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whipped every day on Covey's farm. He was frequently starved. Well, in 1836, Douglass [Douglass' escape plan discovered]

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determined to escape to freedom ASAP. Well, unfortunately, his dreams were

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discovered and his hopes dashed. It wasn't until 1838 the Douglass got his

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chance to make a real run for it. He left the Baltimore shipyard where he was

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working for New York City. Eventually, he settled in Massachusetts. Douglass was a [Douglass goes to MA]

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tireless reader, plowing through all of the Harry Potter books in record time.

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He was also a fan of a little newspaper called the Liberator. In 1841, [The Liberator pictured]

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Douglass attended a meeting where the Liberator's publisher, William Lloyd

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Garrison, gave a speech. Well, Douglass was impressed with Garrison. Garrison was [Douglass sees Garrison]

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impressed with Douglass. Much mutual back-slapping followed. Ouch. A few days later,

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Douglass gave a speech at an important gathering of abolitionists. He was such

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an impressive speaker that he was asked to work as a lecturer for the next three [Douglass speaks]

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years. Well, in reality, he was signing up to speak for the rest of his life. In

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1845, Douglass published his autobiography. While his Narrative of the Life of

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Frederick Douglass is one of the most influential slave narratives, it wasn't [book published]

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the first. During the 18th and 19th centuries, many slave

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narratives were published as a way to start conversations about slavery and [slave narratives start conversations]

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freedom between blacks and whites. We bet those weren't awkward at all. Well, the

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most powerful slave narratives, like the one written by Douglass, not only

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disclosed the realities of slavery to white readers, but also showed that black

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people were human beings who deserved full human rights. Gee, imagine that. [woman reads]

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Douglass would work as a writer and orator up until his death in 1895. [Douglass' grave]

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He also took up the crusade for women's rights and was the first

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African American to be nominated for the vice presidency in 1872, so like, how cool [Women's rights demonstration]

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is that? It's no stretch to say that Douglass was one of the most influential

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African Americans of the 19th century. Yeah... how about them apples, Edward Covey? [Douglass in clouds]