ELA 3: Attention: Creating an Introduction

Attention can be as slippery as a well-oiled weasel, but today we'll give you a few surefire ways to catch it during a presentation. Attention, that is, not a weasel. 

3rd GradeLanguage Arts
Elementary and Middle School3rd Grade
LanguageEnglish Language

Transcript

00:27

start sounding kind of like the Swedish Chef… [Swedish Chef hat lands on the guys head]

00:29

Her dee der der derr...

00:33

Yup, sometimes getting started can be the hardest part.

00:36

Luckily, there are teachers and coaches who offer classes, sessions, and even one-on-one [Someone searching for speaking coaches on the internet]

00:40

training.... all geared towards helping people communicate ideas clearly and effectively

00:44

to a crowd right away.

00:46

But that sounds pretty expensive and time consuming… [Advert for $100 per lesson]

00:49

But never fear!

00:50

We happen to have some handy tricks up our sleeves!

00:53

Ooooh….when will this colorful scarf end….oooooh…. …and we have some actual public speaking [Presentation Introductions book appears at the end of a long scarf pulled out of someones sleeve]

00:59

tips, too, so without further ado, the Shmoop guide to presentation introductions! [Spinning yellow star behind the guide]

01:04

There are three excellent ways to start a presentation, and each way will definitely

01:08

capture your audience's attention. [Book opens to show the 3 methods]

01:11

Method number one?

01:12

Asking a question!

01:13

And be sure your question has something to do with your topic…you can't just ask, "What's

01:18

the best place to get a burger," if your presentation is on global warming! [Burger and the Earth being put on a BBQ]

01:22

Other than that, it can be as open-ended or as specific as you like.

01:26

If your presentation was on the Harry Potter series, you could say something specific as,

01:31

“Who here knows who Harry Potter is?” or as open-ended as, “Who here has ever [Guy holds up a Harry Potter book]

01:36

dreamt of being a wizard?”

01:37

The whole point of a strong first sentence is to get your audience involved, engaged [Audience thinking about themselves in a wizard hat]

01:41

and thinking – right out of the gates.

01:44

Method number two?

01:45

A bold statement!

01:46

If you state your belief with a ton of conviction, other people will be more inclined to sit [Coop pointing at a blackboard]

01:51

up and take notice.

01:52

You could say something like, “Books these days are so boring,” or “The best books [Guy chucks a book away]

01:57

are the ones that involve magic,” or even “Everyone run, there's a giant, angry tiger [Bunny appears out of a magicians hat]

02:01

on the loose in the school gym!” [Guy waving his arms and looking scared]

02:04

On second thought, you probably shouldn't say that last one if you want to keep your [The audiences eyes pop out and they all run away]

02:07

audience in their chairs for the rest of your speech.

02:09

Anyway, the whole point of making a bold statement like that is to grab your audience's attention

02:13

and make them think "Why is the speaker saying this?”

02:16

That way, they'll have no choice but to keep listening! [Audience listening apart from the girl at the end who is shaking in fear]

02:19

Unless that tiger sits next to them…then they might be busy quietly freaking out… [Girl is staring at the tiger sat next to her]

02:23

And finally, method number three: the cold hard facts.

02:26

If you start with a fact or percentage, you'll really convince the audience that you've done

02:31

your research and know what you're going to be talking about.

02:33

Maybe you know the exact percentage of teens who have read the Harry Potter series in the [Girl reading a book on the couch]

02:37

last decade, or maybe you know the number of public libraries that have closed in the

02:41

past decade due to a shortage of Potter books... [Closed forever sign on a library]

02:44

People loves facts.

02:45

Seriously, a recent study showed that 82% of people love facts! [Audience with hearts in their eyes]

02:49

…Okay, we just made that up, don't quote us.

02:51

So there you have it – three ways to start your speech like a champ!

02:54

Oh, and no need to use them all at the same time.

02:57

Just choosing one would be grand!

02:59

Though it could be fun to try and combine all three...

03:01

“Did you know that we absolutely hate chocolate cake because it's the worst kind of cake, [Guy throws a plate of chocolate cake away]

03:06

even though 85% of you will disagree?!”

03:09

A question, a bold statement AND a statistic.

03:12

All in one.

03:13

Not bad. [Guy puts out to lunch sign on stage]

03:14

Phew!

03:15

We deserve a break. [Tiger walks onto the stage]