ELA 3: Conjunctions

Today we're learning all about verbal duct tape: the conjunction. Warning, do not try to tape things together with conjunctions. Yelling "But" at your poster will not stick it to the wall. No matter how hard you yell.

3rd GradeLanguage Arts
Elementary and Middle School3rd Grade
LanguageEnglish Language

Transcript

00:21

But what if you wanted to connect two complete thoughts together? [Man making an odd face]

00:25

Sure you could try duct tape, but…it's not super effective.

00:28

So put that roll of tape away and grab your handy roll of conjunctions!

00:32

…okay so they don't come in a roll, whatever. [Man waiting for Write supplies]

00:35

But before we try to use conjunctions, let's rewind for a second.

00:38

Take a look at this sentence...

00:39

“The boy ran to the store.”

00:41

Pretty simple, huh?

00:42

No frills, no sparkles.

00:43

Just a capital letter, noun in the subject, verb in the predicate, and a period.

00:48

Simple. [Hand uses rubber to rub out sentence]

00:49

How about this one....

00:50

“My teacher asked me a question.”

00:52

Teacher is the subject, asked is the verb, and yup, simple is the sentence.

00:57

Alright, now that we've got a grasp of simple sentences, let's move on to something a bit [Woman practicing yoga moves]

01:01

more complex: compound sentences.

01:04

These types of sentences still have a subject, a verb, a capital letter and an ending punctuation

01:09

mark, but now they've also got a few extra bits to spice things up. [A selection of spice jars]

01:13

Like a comma.

01:14

Compound sentences always have a comma.

01:16

And then right after that comma, they've got a conjunction.

01:19

Like this example: “I wanted to go to the store, but I had to clean my room.”

01:23

See the word that comes after the comma?

01:25

But?

01:26

But is a conjunction.

01:27

So we took our two complete thoughts, "I wanted to go to the store," and "I had to clean my

01:32

room," and we mashed them together with a nifty conjunction! [Sentences transformed together in a puff of smoke]

01:35

Let's look at another example.

01:36

“I wanted to go to the movies," and "I did my chores early."

01:40

How would we make this a compound sentence?

01:42

Bingo!

01:43

A conjunction.

01:44

"I wanted to go to the movies, so I did my chores early.”

01:47

There's our comma in the middle, followed by “so,” our conjunction. [Sentences transformed into compound sentence]

01:51

Let's do one more!

01:52

“I think I'll get the red shirt," and "Maybe I'll get the blue one."

01:56

We'd add in a beautiful little conjunction…in this case, "or," and we end up with,

02:00

"I think I'll get the red shirt, or maybe I'll get the blue one.”

02:04

In each of our examples, the comma and its conjunction serve to connect two separate [commas and conjunctions highlighted]

02:08

and complete thoughts together into one sentence.

02:11

Pretty simple, right?

02:12

Wait, no.

02:13

Complex?

02:13

Complicated?

02:14

Compound!

02:15

That's it.

02:16

Phew.

02:16

All those conjunctions messed with our brain…good thing we've got this handy roll of duct tape [Man's head opens up and duct tape is placed on his brain]

02:20

to put it back together!