ELA 3: Nonfiction Text Features

It may not be chock full of dinosaurs, wizards, and dinosaur wizards, but nonfiction will always be there for you when you need information about the real world. Today we'll learn about some of the features you might see when reading nonfiction.

3rd GradeLanguage Arts
Elementary and Middle School3rd Grade
LanguageEnglish Language

Transcript

00:23

Informational texts often include photographs, a glossary, labels, diagrams, and captions.

00:28

It’s a good thing, too, because if we had to consume pages and pages of information [Pages turn over in a book quickly]

00:33

without a pretty little bar graph every now and again to break things up, we might go

00:36

a bit bonkers. [Girl hits face with a book]

00:37

They’re not just there for their looks, though.

00:40

These features help to teach us more about the subject matter than just the writing can

00:43

teach us alone.

00:44

You know that saying, “A picture is worth a thousand words?” [Framed picture of a historical battle]

00:47

Well, a flow chart has to be worth at least three hundred.

00:50

When we read articles, maps, and atlases, it’s important to pay attention to all of

00:54

the writing in the book, and not just the main paragraphs.

00:57

The writers, creators and illustrators didn’t plug in all those gizmos and whatchamacallits [Man holding his abdomen and doctor appears]

01:01

for their health.

01:02

The next time you read an atlas, article, or map, make sure you pay attention to all

01:05

those little floating boxes with writing in them.

01:08

Trust us, they’re important.

01:09

A little floating box told us so. [A box contained in a page of an article]