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Forestry

Overview

If a tree falls in the forest but nobody is there to hear it…you'll still study it.

Description

It's not hard to figure out what forestry is about. Just looking at the word tells you that people in this field are bonkers about trees. Little trees, big trees, even weird-looking trees. Especially weird-looking trees.

In the realm of forestry, you'll learn all about the maintenance and use of forests, and what can grow where. If you've ever wanted to grow a mango tree in your New Hampshire backyard, you're in for a big disappointment.

Or maybe you know that the climate isn't appropriate for a tropical fruit tree and that your labors will bear no fruit.

Either way, classes in this major will you help you flesh all of that out. You'll finally learn why the same trees are bigger in different areas, and how a 200-foot behemoth could possibly pull water all the way to its upper branches.

Forestry is kind of like computer science in that they're both rather specific. For those who are positive about the job they'd like to get after graduation, this is fantastic news. You know what you like. Good for you.

If, on the other hand, your favorite color changes every week, a more general degree might be a better fit.

Majoring in forestry means you'll deal with trees and forests in one way or another. Pretty simple. This could mean anything from studying trees directly to pencil-pushing so you can save trees from those darn lumber companies.

Seriously, guys. We have enough wooden bowling pins.

And grad school? Let's see. The future of trees is bleak. We're chopping them down to make houses for the ever-growing human population…with their flesh. Getting an advanced degree in forestry is certainly helpful, but may be a little excessive.

Famous People who majored in Forestry

  • Aldo Leopold, pioneer in wildlife conservation
  • Gifford Pinchot, former governor of Pennsylvania
  • Johnny Appleseed
  • Brian Goldberg, environmental planner
  • William B. Greeley, third Chief of the Forest Service

Percentage of US students who major in Forestry:

0.11%

Stats obtained from this source.