Study Guide

Ferris Bueller's Day Off Scene 12

Scene 12

Scene 12

Groovin' on Von Steuben

  • Cut to the Von Steuben Parade traversing downtown Chicago and causing a traffic jam. Ferris, Cameron, and Sloane are in the back of a cab. Sloane looks tired; Ferris smooches her; Cameron says they need to get the car back home. Ferris and Sloane don't want to.
  • What the heck is the Von Steuben Parade? It's part of German-Americans' celebration of Von Steuben Day. Marching, music, dancing… it's pretty awesome. Parades take place all across the United States, but the biggest crowds are in New York and Chicago. Oh, and it all goes down on a Saturday in mid-September—not on a school day, and not in the spring. Whoops.
  • Cameron says he knows that Ferris and Sloane don't care that it's he, Cameron, who will get in beaucoup trouble if they get busted. Ferris says that hurts and asks Cameron what he's seen today. Cameron says nothing good. Ouch—that was way harsh, Cam.
  • Ferris's rebuttal, focused on all of the cool stuff they've done so far ("We ate pancreas!"), is interrupted by Cameron freezing and imploring Ferris to look at the car next to him. Who's that? Oh, hi, Ferris's dad.
  • Ferris and his dad lock eyes. His dad glances away for a split second, and when he looks back he sees Sloane wearing sunglasses, alone. The boys lay on the floor, frantically rubbing a lucky rabbit's foot.
  • Sloane flirts with Ferris's dad. She also teases Ferris, so he tickles her. She starts laughing hysterically and, being "all alone," looks like a total nut job to Mr. Bueller. He holds his newspaper up and resumes reading. Phew. For so many reasons, phew. We zoom in on a headline on his paper that reads, "Community rallies around sick youth."
  • Back at the Bueller home, a tall gate separates Rooney and the dog. The dog's chowing down on the dean's shoe. When wannabe Cujo spots Rooney peering over the top of the gate, it once again goes berserk, and Rooney slides back down.
  • Meanwhile, Cameron and Sloane cut through the throngs of parade-goers. Ferris is MIA. Cameron is miffed and thinks Ferris went home, or even back to school, but Sloane assures him that's ridiculous. Cameron insists Ferris would do it just to make him sweat.
  • Turns out Ferris is on a parade float, and he dedicates Wayne Newton's "Danke Schoen" to his friend Cameron, "a young man who doesn't think he's seen anything good today." Ferris then serenades some old ladies in lederhosen while Cameron and Sloane continue their walk-and-talk.
  • Cameron says that Ferris can handle anything, and he, Cameron, can't handle anything.
  • For his next song, Ferris leads what seems like the entire city of Chicago in a huge dance party set to The Beatles' version of "Twist and Shout." Seriously; everybody's getting their groove on: your average German-American parade attendees, construction workers, synchronized dancers who appear out of nowhere, Cameron and Sloane, window washers, babies—oh, and Ferris's dad, who, fortunately, is watching from his window high, high above.