ELA 4: Adjectives

Amazing, awesome, funny, genius, scrumdiddlyuptious...we could go on describing this video, but maybe you should learn what sorts of words those are first. Hit play to learn more.

4th GradeLanguage Arts
LanguageEnglish Language

Transcript

00:30

Chances are you would choose to focus on the adjectives. Words like cheesy and magical.

00:35

Now that would make for one pretty picture… Or at least a pretty memorable one. [Girl paints picture of magical cheeseburger]

00:39

So what are these memorable words? They're called adjectives, and they're words that

00:43

describe things.

00:44

You know… "twenty smelly, yellow bananas," or "one desperately hungry monkey." We hope [Monkey staring at bananas]

00:49

he's not too desperate. Those look nasty.

00:52

Number, opinions, sizes, age, shape, color, origin, material, and purpose are all descriptors

00:57

that identify the people, places, and things in the stories we read and hear.

01:02

And when we describe someone or something, the adjectives should be written in that exact

01:06

order.

01:06

Sure, that long list might seem a little intimidating, but don’t fear – we’ve got a pneumonic [List of descriptors and Dino discusses mneumonic device]

01:11

device that'll make remembering this list easy as pie.

01:14

Here it is: N-O-S-A-S-C-O-M-P.

01:16

Think of it like that rule at your library: “No sassy computers.” [Computer screen showing lots of 0's and 1's]

01:20

What, your library doesn’t have that rule? Maybe we need to find less sassy computers…

01:25

And yeah, we know, there are two Os and two Ss…not everything in life is easy. We'll

01:30

just have to power up our brain and remember that opinions come before origin, and size

01:34

comes before shape.

01:35

Anyway, let's put this pneumonic device to use.

01:38

Let's say we wanted to describe an airplane. [Airplane flying in the sky]

01:40

It's a Canadian airplane...

01:42

…it's really big…

01:43

…and it's bright blue.

01:45

We could say that it's a Canadian, bright blue, big airplane.

01:48

But that sounds a little bit weird, doesn't it? And you know why? Because it doesn't follow

01:52

NOSASCOMP.

01:53

So let's figure out why. “Canadian” is the origin, “bright blue” is the color,

01:58

“big” is the size.

01:59

But when we look back at NOSASCOMP, we can see that the size should come before the color,

02:04

which comes before the origin.

02:06

So when we flip our words around to be in the correct NOSASCOMP order, we get... [Blue Canadian airplane flying]

02:09

“The big, bright blue, Canadian airplane.”

02:12

See how much better that sounds? It’s like everything is right with the world again.

02:16

Using adjectives is always a good idea, because it gives your reader lots of description, [Taxis in traffic in New York]

02:21

but you all the descriptions in the world won't help an awkward, clunky sentence.

02:25

And that's why you should always use NOSASCOMP.

02:27

…Seriously, though, that computer has an attitude problem. Maybe we just need to show

02:32

it the keys to happiness. [A keyboard with a smiley face]

02:33

…Oh. That explains a lot.