Social Studies 4: Elections in the U.S.

Time to watch a video about democratic systems of government. Well, I guess we don't have to watch it. Let's take a vote.

4th GradeSocial Studies
Elementary and Middle School4th Grade
LanguageEnglish Language

Transcript

00:28

Thankfully, when it comes to elections in the United States, you really do have a choice.

00:33

That's because Elections in the United States are democratic systems. [A box on a voting card is ticked]

00:36

But what does that mean?

00:37

Well, for starters, it means that they're both free and honest – voters can cast their [Coop pointing at a blackboard]

00:42

votes privately and get to actually have a choice of candidates.

00:45

And that's pretty important.

00:46

If your mom asked if you wanted tuna casserole, tuna casserole, or tuna casserole for dinner, [Three dishes of tuna casserole]

00:51

well, that's really not much of a decision at all, is it?

00:53

And if she really wants us to eat the leftover tuna casserole, just come out at say it already, [The tuna casserole is given to the dog]

00:58

Mom.

00:59

Voting booths are usually divided up with curtains or walls in order to give the voter

01:03

privacy.

01:04

This is done so that voters can freely choose whoever they want without being worried

01:07

that other will judge them for it. [Man holding up his card and smiling]

01:08

It also doubles as a great place to quickly check if your fly is low without everyone [Jeans with an unzipped fly]

01:13

totally laughing at you.

01:14

When people all over the country vote in various elections, they are participating in a democratic

01:19

system because the people they elect are given the power to make decisions on behalf of everyone

01:23

else.

01:24

In the case of the presidency, citizens vote for electors that in turn select the next [People appearing on a state map]

01:29

president.

01:30

The entire system is built to allow people in a real way to have their voices heard, which [Map of the US showing democratic and republican states]

01:34

is why it works so well.

01:36

In a class election, votes are counted as a pure democracy – meaning that each and [Teacher pointing at the blackboard]

01:40

every vote is counted and weighted equally, and the candidate with the majority wins.

01:46

Democracy is one the most important aspects of the United States government, because it

01:49

ensures that the power is always in the hands of the people. ['We the people' is highlighted on the constitution]

01:52

That's why you'd be silly to not to be involved when given the opportunity – it would be

01:56

like having a giant magical sledgehammer and not using it to spectacularly smash a watermelon [Girl smashes the watermelon with her sledgehammer]

02:02

into a million pieces.

02:04

And then a pumpkin!

02:05

And then a kitchen tabl—

02:06

Wait, no, not that. [No sign appears on the table]

02:07

Shmoop does not endorse destroying your furniture…

02:10

unless your parents vote yes on it first. [Parents put their thumbs up]

02:12

Boom.

02:13

Democracy. [The girl smiles]