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A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

  

by Ernest Hemingway

A Clean, Well-Lighted Place: A Cafe of My Own Quiz

Think you’ve got your head wrapped around A Clean, Well-Lighted Place? Put your knowledge to the test. Good luck — the Stickman is counting on you!
Q. Who wants to close the cafe and send everyone home?


Old man
Older waiter
Younger waiter
The police - there is a curfew, after all
Q. What impressive thing can we say about the old man's drinking?


He chooses his cabernets carefully
No spills!
He offers beer to the whole bar
Q. Why is there dialogue but limited description of the characters?


Dialogue is a far superior method of communication
This is Hemingway. That's what he does.
Uncharacteristically, Hemingway is trying to take a page from James Joyce.
Q. What is the Spanish word for nothing?


Nada
Nichts
Bupkis
Yai
Q. Which statement might accurately summarize this story?


Nothing is certain but death and taxes.
Nothing is certain but loneliness.
War does not determine who is right. War determines who is left.
Never test the depth of a river with both feet.
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