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Agriculture

Overview

Agriculture: where you reap what you sow.

Description

Some people say that life without love is no life at all, but we think the bare necessity of life is something else: food. Sure, it's great to come home to a loving partner…but if you're anything like us, you'll find it equally satisfying to come home to a five-layer burrito that's been smothered in salsa verde. Mmm.

Back on track, though. That food has to come from somewhere, and rice doesn't grow itself (well, it kind of does, but you know what we mean).

Also, if you think that ugly wool Christmas sweater came from the tears of satyrs and wood nymphs, you're…not that far off, actually.

When you consider how many people there are in the world, the fact that all of them have got to eat is a downright overwhelming thought. That's what the students in agriculture are here for—feeding people. They understand not only what makes rice grow, but also what can improve its health and resistance to disease. Nothing's worse than a sickly grain of rice. Except, you know, a sickly human child.

If you're interested in cultivating plants and animals for human consumption, then agriculture could be the perfect major for you. From hybridization to improving the lifespan of fruit-bearing trees, agriculturists make sure we use plants and animals efficiently.

But don't tell them that. Hopefully, they never get organized and try to overthrow us. Or learn to read.

Luckily, we still have opposable thumbs. Ha.

Studying agriculture can lead you down career paths other than farming, too. A quarter of agriculture graduates go back and get a graduate degree, but that's often for people specializing in something very specific.

From working in a lab to doing landscape work, the options are aplenty. Don't worry, signing up for this major won't pigeonhole you into a career where overalls and straw hats are required.

Unless, of course, it's for a fashion statement. We're sure "farm chic" is a thing…

Famous People who majored in Agriculture

  • Robert Bakewell, pioneer in stockbreeding
  • Albert Howard, one of the first organic farmers
  • M.S. Swaminathan, an Indian geneticist
  • Bruce Maloch, Arkansas state senator
  • Matt Lohr, Virginia house member

Percentage of US students who major in Agriculture:

0.19%

Stats obtained from this source.