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Common Core Standards: ELA - Literacy

Grade 11-12

Reading RH.11-12.7

RH.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

Grossbusters

Zits, pimples, acne, puss-geyser, white-head, sand-paper, teen-bumps, blemish, your little friends...you finally start to have an interest in romantic relationships, and your body celebrates by displaying your pore-clogged finest. To solve this timeless nuisance common to every prom-worthy youth, multiple resources are considered, everything from creams, to lotions, to make-up. You’d be in luck if the next school event were a masquerade. Any problem or question that begs an answer is in need of multiple sources of information from which to best derive an answer. In the case of pubescent pocks, you’ll use as many treatments and advice columns you can find. In the case of educational inquires related to historical topics, you’ll need as many diverse sources as you can find that can be synthesized to form a valid solution. All you have to do is apply the right amount of pressure to these sources and POP; the answer to your question will simply ooze out.

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Teaching Guides Using this Standard

Example

Grossbusters II

So students, when you’re given a question or problem to solve, where is the first place you turn (and your mom doesn’t count)? You should head for the research. Finding diverse sources that relate to the problem at hand won’t be the hard part; it’s squeezing out all of the information from the sources and mixing it all together to form a conclusion cocktail that will be the challenge:

The information is waiting just under the surface to burst forth and gush out solutions to the problems, so be ready.

  • Add it all up: When you have several sources at hand, connecting them all in a well-thought-out application to the question is the end game. This is the point of it all: How does each piece jigsaw together to form a cohesive answer to the problem presented? When researching these items together, the best thing you can do is keep the trends consistent. All docs and pics must be directly relatable to the central question (which is why the first point remains relevant).
  • Grouping: Consider sources beyond the text. It’s easy to go for the text first; however, visuals and quantitative data can also be invaluable in addressing a question. Bonus for history and social studies: look into political cartoons.
  • Add it all up: When you have several sources at hand, connecting them all in a well-thought-out application to the question is the end game. This is the point of it all: How does each piece jigsaw together to form a cohesive answer to the problem presented? When researching these items together, the best thing you can do is keep the trends consistent. All docs and pics must be directly relatable to the central question (which is why the first point remains relevant).

The information is waiting just under the surface to burst forth and gush out solutions to the problems, so be ready.

Drill

 This drill will be a research, task-based assignment. The nature of the standard suggests that the studied sources contribute to a possible solution to an open-ended question. Complete the following steps:

Step One: Consider the following quote:

“Whoever wishes to foresee the future must consult the past; for human events ever resemble those of preceding times. This arises from the fact that they are produced by men who ever have been, and ever shall be, animated by the same passions, and thus they necessarily have the same results.” - Machiavelli

Step Two: Construct a topic of historical importance that applies to Machiavelli’s quote. That is, consider an idea, event, action, or even human failing that seems to be reinterpreted several times throughout history. This may or may not contribute to your current mode of study, but may encompass a topic already addressed.

Step Three: Gather multimedia sources that address the recurrent issue or event; specifically gather information related to those multiple manifestations. Record the collected data in the following manner:

Topic of Discussion:

Case Study 1:

  • Quantitative Data Source:
  • Qualitative Data Source:
  • Visual Data Source:

Case Study 2:

  • Quantitative Data Source:
  • Qualitative Data Source:
  • Visual Data Source:

Step Four: Compile your information in a multi-media presentation in which you address the following criteria:


  • Present the topic studied; give a brief indication of how this problem may be solved (in other words, how could humanity resist another manifestation of the same issue).
  • Explain the previous case studies and how they fit into the duplicated topic. Display all data acquired. The qualitative example may be abbreviated or paraphrased when the length is not conducive to a presentation format.
  • Write a detailed explanation pertaining to the event which is repeated, the past cases, the future possibilities, and how this may be prevented. This should include line references from all sources with proper citations. Due to the detail involved, this assignment warrants a 2-4 page typed response.

Step Five: Catch up on some sleep and eat some cookies; you’ve earned it.

Aligned Resources