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The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World

The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World

by Gabriel García Márquez

The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World Analysis

Literary Devices in The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

"The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World" is full of sea imagery, from the title on forward. When the dead body first approaches the shore, the kids playing think he is a whale; then, a ship. He ev...

Setting

Márquez never specifies the time or place of his story, but if you're familiar with his other works you can guess that the action takes place somewhere in Latin America. Given the villager's m...

Narrator Point of View

It might be tempting to label this story as told from an omniscient point of view. After all, the narrative gets into the heads of many different villagers at many different times. But realize that...

Genre

Make that "Magical Realism squared." As we talk about in our Overview, Márquez is the master of this genre. He helped launch it to fame with his novel 100 Years of Solitude, and "The Handsomes...

Tone

The last paragraph of "The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World" is probably the best place to look to get a handle on Márquez's tone. As the villagers imagine the way their world has changed,...

Writing Style

The style of "The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World" is in itself fairly simple. Most of the sentence constructions are straightforward; most of the sentences are short. But it's also clear that...

What's Up with the Title?

The main part of the title is fairly straightforward. This is the story of a handsome drowned man and the impact he has on a small fishing village. The drowned man is the focus of the tale; so he g...

What's Up with the Ending?

In "Symbols, Imagery, Allegory," we talk about the flowers which crop up noticeably at four different points in the story. First, we hear that the village is flowerless. Next, the women imagine tha...

Plot Analysis

An ordinary seaside village…This short story starts, as short stories should, with something significant happening. We're not in the initial situation for any length of time at the start of t...

Trivia

In 2000, a Peruvian newspaper reported that Márquez was dying and published his farewell poem. As it turns out, he was not dying, and the poem was written by some imitation hack. (Source)

Steaminess Rating

This is perhaps the one place where Márquez's subtitle, "A Tale for Children," rings true. Though the women do get rather worked up over the handsome, virile body of the drowned man, there's n...

Allusions

Estevanico (implicitly, by the name "Esteban" given to the drowned man) Lautaro (6) – Lautaro was military figure in the Arauco War, a conflict in the mid 1500s between colonizing Spaniards a...

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