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A Room of One's Own

A Room of One's Own

by Virginia Woolf

A Room of One's Own Analysis

Literary Devices in A Room of One's Own

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

Setting

Homebody?You might have noticed that we don't move around much in A Room of One's Own. We stroll around a few campuses outside of London, visit the library, then spend the rest of the time in Mary...

Narrator Point of View

Woolf plays fast and loose with her narrative technique in A Room of One's Own (as she does in much of her other writing), so pinning the narrator down is tricky.At first, Virginia Woolf is speakin...

Genre

How could all of these genres describe a book thinner than a paperclip? Two reasons.The real genre of A Room of One's Own is "essay," but that's not generally considered a fictional genre. Woolf is...

Tone

At the beginning of A Room of One's Own, Woolf swears up and down that she won't be able to say anything really profound about Women and Fiction. "All I [can] do," she writes, "[is] to offer you an...

Writing Style

If most books show you a totally finished building with a nice façade, Woolf is giving us a tour of the construction site.Mostly, authors work hard to make you forget that the fictional character...

What's Up With the Title?

Woolf isn't all mysterious about the title of A Room of One's Own; she really lays it right out there. The point of her essay is that women—and all writers—need to have rooms of their own. Pref...

What's Up With the Ending?

A Room of One's Own ends with a call to action: Woolf tells women to get off their butts, work hard, find a private room, and earn five hundred pounds a year. This way, in a few generations, a Shak...

Tough-o-Meter

Woolf isn't trying to write a difficult book here. She really wants everyone to understand her basic argument—that the material conditions of an artist's life totally affect the work they produce...

Plot Analysis

No, Really, It's a Fake UniversityMary has meals at Oxbridge University and Fernham College that show her how different men's and women's experiences are. (Plus some unpleasant encounters at Oxbrid...

Booker's Seven Basic Plots Analysis

Woolf is asked to address a couple of audiences on the topic of Women and Fiction. Okay, not a dramatic call—but definitely a literal one. Mary visits seductive but forbidding Oxbridge and endure...

Three-Act Plot Analysis

Mary notices that, unlike the ladies room, the women's college is way worse than the men's college. This leads her to realize that there are serious questions to be asked about Women and Fiction.At...

Trivia

When she's talking about female friendship in life's adventure, Woolf pretends to be worried that a certain Sir Chartres Biron is hiding behind a curtain. She's talking about the magistrate in char...

Steaminess Rating

This isn't exactly a book about Mary Beton's amorous adventures. But there is a bit of sex in this book, especially if you read carefully. Mary Beton talks a bit about overt sex scenes in literatur...

Allusions

Fanny Burney (1.1, 4.21)Jane Austen (1.1, 3.6, 3.8, 4.1, 4.22, 4.32, 4.33, 5.5, 5.15, 5.16), Pride and Prejudice (4.21, 4.22, 4.27), Emma (4.28, 5.3, 5.14, [Mr. Woodhouse 6.16])Charlotte Brontë...

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