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Sense and Sensibility

Sense and Sensibility

by Jane Austen

Sense and Sensibility Analysis

Literary Devices in Sense and Sensibility

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

Symbols aren't really Austen's thing. Sure, occasionally things ring somewhat symbolic bells for us – for example, how Marianne's passionate music or Elinor's careful, precise drawings expres...

Setting

This novel moves between the town and the country, just as most people of a certain class did in Austen's time. Austen's very concerned with the social milieu of her characters, and her settings ve...

Narrator Point of View

This is a textbook third person omniscient narrator – we have a privileged view inside the minds of most of the characters, and Austen's strong narratorial voice takes us in and out of the pe...

Genre

OK, most difficult things first: though we'd be hard pressed to simply label Austen's novel a work of satire, her writing is heavily satirical throughout. Her deadpan humor and biting send ups of t...

Tone

There's occasionally something of a "wink wink, nudge nudge" tone to Austen's writing here; her deadpan humor is sharp, witty, and usually between the lines. Humor is more often than not insinuated...

Writing Style

Austen's style is famously… well, together. Simply put, she just really knows what she's up to. She doesn't believe in mincing words, nor does she indulge in long, flowery flights of fancy li...

What's Up With the Title?

This book was originally titled "Elinor and Marianne," but Sense and Sensibility is barely a leap from there – the traits included in the title describe these two main characters to a tee. El...

What's Up With the Ending?

What is up with this ending? Sympathetic readers have been puzzling over the conclusion to Sense and Sensibility since the novel's arrival on the literary scene. The events that unfold aren't the m...

Plot Analysis

The Dashwoods move from their childhood home, Norland, to a new place and a new life.The novel begins with a time of transition and new beginnings – after the death of their father, the Dashw...

Booker's Seven Basic Plots Analysis

The Dashwoods adjust to life after the death of their father; they move to Devonshire and settle in to a brand new life at Barton Cottage. (Chapters 1-8)The beginning of the novel sets us up for wh...

Three Act Plot Analysis

Chapters 1-14. Elinor and Marianne are both involved in the relationships that will shape the rest of the novel.Chapters 15-43. Happy endings for either Marianne or Elinor seem impossible, due to W...

Trivia

The story's not entirely over, apparently – a reinterpreted version, Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters (a follow up to Pride and Prejudice and Zombies) was recently! (Source)Austen in lo...

Steaminess Rating

The lovers in Sense and Sensibility are all chaste and innocent – at least, as far as we know. As with all things Austen, implication is more important here than what happens openly on the pa...

Allusions

William Cowper (3.11, 10.4, 17.6)Sir Walter Scott (10.4, 17.6)Alexander Pope (10.4)Celtic mythology, Queen Mab (12.5) James Thomson (17.6)

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