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Typical Day

Professor Jody Mulligan wakes up at 6:15, leaves her mansion in the hills and gets into her Ferrari.

Okay, you called our bluff.

She lives in a cute little ranch—nothing to write home about, but it’s cozy. Over her morning coffee, she plans that day’s lessons. She teaches a class called "American Civilization Since 1877" to mostly freshmen and sophomores, then will be delivering a seminar on "Women in Modern History" later on. Her "History of Technological Advancements" class has been canceled due to a burst pipe and flooding in the classroom. The irony is not lost on her.

Isn’t it ironic. Don't you think?

After planning her lesson and seminar outline, she heads into the office and answers some emails. (Yes, Netflix, the viewing quality of Old School was just fine.) She has a meeting at 9:30 with the provost and chairs of several other departments to discuss a variety of issues, then her American Civilization class is at 10:30. After broadening some minds and making several youths ridiculously passionate about history, Professor Mulligan rewards herself by grabbing a quick lunch at a fancy steakhouse. Psych. She grabs a 6-inch at Subway, but man does she love what she does for a living.

Professor Mulligan's seminar is from 2-4, and it goes swimmingly. There is nothing she loves more than educating students about the phenomenal contributions of such notables as Marie Curie, Susan B. Anthony and Harriet Tubman. One attendee of the seminar asks why she didn't include Oprah in her list of influential and important women from recent history. Oy.

The professor runs back to the office, answers some more emails and starts to think about the next day's lessons. Before heading home, she gets together with a couple other professors for coffee and to discuss respective teaching methods—what is working, what isn't. Okay, and also to talk about how funny Old School is. It's not like these people don't have lives.

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