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Common Core Standards: ELA

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening

Speaking and Listening CCRA.SL.1

Comprehension and Collaboration

1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Finding a job in which you will never have to speak in order to succeed is like finding a four-leaf clover: it can be done, but you automatically qualify as “lucky” just for pulling it off. (We at Shmoop can think of two such jobs: hermetic writer and eccentric artist. And even these people probably have to do book readings and museum launches and things.) For the rest of us, being able to converse with people from a wide variety of backgrounds and on a wide variety of topics is a must.

College will prepare our young ones for the real world by requiring them to present and debate and discuss in their classes, both individually and in groups. And since we wouldn’t want them to have that classic deer-in-headlights expression in their college classes, we’re going to get them started early on this whole coversation-and-collaboration dealio.

Here are some activities and question-and-answer exercises you can use in your classes to get your students to talk and present their ideas clearly and logically:

Example 1

Sample Activities for Use in Class

1. Divide students into pairs or small groups. Have each pair or group choose a person to speak first, and give the non-speaker or speaker a pile of index cards on which are written one of the staple questions: Who?, Why?, What?, When?, Where? and How?.

The speaker begins by making a short statement of an opinion, such as “Johnny Depp is the best actor alive.” The non-speaker responds by reading the top card in his or her pile. The speaker responds by answering the question. Continue until all the cards have been used, then have the speaker switch places with the non-speaker, shuffle the cards, and begin again.

Often, a question on a card will not seem to match up with the statement given. For instance, the speaker might say “Johnny Depp is the best actor alive,” and the non-speaker may respond with “When?” Rather than skipping the question, the speaker should try to interpret it so that it can be answered. For instance, the question “When?” might be answered with “Ever since he appeared in Pirates of the Carribbean. I don’t count his early movies because they were terrible.”

Example 2

2. Choose a student for each role and have them read the following scene from Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest:

LADY BRACKNELL. May I ask if it is in this house that your invalid friend Mr. Bunbury resides?
ALGERNON. [Stammering.] Oh! No! Bunbury doesn’t live here. Bunbury is somewhere else at present. In fact, Bunbury is dead,
LADY BRACKNELL. Dead! When did Mr. Bunbury die? His death must have been extremely sudden.
ALGERNON. [Airily.] Oh! I killed Bunbury this afternoon. I mean poor Bunbury died this afternoon.
LADY BRACKNELL. What did he die of?
ALGERNON. Bunbury? Oh, he was quite exploded.
LADY BRACKNELL. Exploded! Was he the victim of a revolutionary outrage? I was not aware that Mr. Bunbury was interested in social legislation. If so, he is well punished for his morbidity.
ALGERNON. My dear Aunt Augusta, I mean he was found out! The doctors found out that Bunbury could not live, that is what I mean—so Bunbury died.
LADY BRACKNELL. He seems to have had great confidence in the opinion of his physicians. I am glad, however, that he made up his mind at the last to some definite course of action, and acted under proper medical advice.

i. If you were to ask each of the speakers who “Bunbury” is, what would each of them likely say?

(Possible Answers: Algernon knows that Bunbury is fictional, so he makes up a story about how Bunbury, who has been sick for some time, finally died. It’s a pretty transparent story, though; apparently the poor fellow died because his doctors told him to stop living. Luckily for Algernon, Lady Bracknell is too dense to realize this, so she simple applauds Bunbury for finally picking an option between “get well” and “die,” instead of hanging around in a state of illness forever. Alternately, students might think Algernon really did kill Bunbury and is trying to cover it up, in which case he’s still lucky that Lady Bracknell is so impossibly dense.

Lady Bracknell, meanwhile, seems to think that Bunbury is and always has been a real person. She also obviously doesn’t think much of invalids, people with “revolutionary” political ideas, or people who do not take their doctors’ advice. In fact, it’s fair to say Lady Bracknell doesn’t think much at all.)

ii. If you were Lady Bracknell, how would you respond to the news that Bunbury, Algernon’s sick friend whom you have never met, is dead? How would that differ from the way Lady Bracknell responds here?

(Possible Answers: Most people are going to react much more strongly to the news that Bunbury is dead and especially to Algernon’s slip that he killed Bunbury. Reactions might range from sympathy to suspicion to outrage. In most cases, students are going to respond to the words much less densely than Lady Bracknell and with greater concern for Bunbury’s well-being, rather than for Bunbury’s good sense in agreeing to die per his doctor’s advice.)

Example 3

3. Interviews

Have students pair up and write down seven to ten interview questions to ask the other person. (You may wish to put students in pairs in order to avoid teams “interviewing” their best friends.) Offer a few examples, such as “What's the most interesting trip you've ever taken?” or “Tell me about your favorite sport.” Tell students to avoid questions that can be answered with one word, such as “Do you like school?” or “Where were you born?”, if possible. They can use these kinds of questions for follow-up, if needed.

Once students have developed their list of questions, have each person in the pair interview the other, with the youngest member of the pair asking questions first. Tell students that they should start with their questions but should not stick to them. Instead, they should listen to their partners, asking any follow-up or additional questions that come to mind after the other person speaks. For instance, if the person being interviewed starts talking about how the most interesting trip she's ever taken was a cruise to Alaska, the other person should ask follow-up questions like, “What time of year was it?”, “Did you see any polar bears/seals/wolves?”, or “What was the best thing on the cruise ship?”, instead of jumping ahead to his next question. Students may move on to the next question only if the conversation stalls.

Give students 10-15 minutes each to interview their partners (20-30 minutes total), then reconvene the class and discuss what they learned about keeping a conversation going.

Example 4

4. Bogus Adventure Stories

This activity works best with smaller classes; or, you may wish to break students into groups of 8 to 12 people apiece.

Have the class or groups sit in a circle where they can hear one another. One person in each circle begins an adventure story by giving a setting such as, “I was in the haunted house up on Beech Street by the cemetery last weekend. It was dark, and the wind howled in the trees. I had gone up to the house because....” The person sitting to the right of the person who began the story continues, adding two to three more lines before the person to the right of this person continues the story, until everyone in the group has had a turn.

Students' stories can be outrageous, but they should not be absurd. Also, the story must be internally consistent. For instance, if Student 2 says that he went to the haunted house with his eight-year-old sister who was carrying a flashlight, Student 5 should not suddenly switch to going to the haunted house with her twenty-year-old brother who is carrying a camera unless one of the students in between has explained this change. This activity encourages students to listen to one another and pay attention so they can get the details right.

Quiz 1 Questions

Here's an example of a quiz that could be used to test this standard.

  1. Questions 1-5 are based on the following passage:

    “The world’s best grilled cheese sandwiches always have meat in them in addition to cheese. Whether it’s turkey, bacon, or turkey bacon, a grilled cheese sandwich just isn’t complete without meat. We know this is true because it rhymes, and also because there is no one on the planet who won’t eat a delicious grilled cheese sandwich with meat in it. However, you should never confuse a grilled cheese sandwich with meat in it for a cheeseburger. It’s easy to tell the difference because grilled cheese sandwiches are found all over the world, but you can only get a cheeseburger in Paradise.”

    The speaker’s main point appears to be that:

    Correct Answer:

    Grilled cheese sandwiches are best if they contain both meat and cheese.

    Answer Explanation:

    (d) - The very first line of the passage declares, “The world’s best grilled cheese sandwiches always have meat in them in addition to cheese,” and this is the author’s main point.


  2. Which of the following points is the LEAST helpful for the speaker? In other words, which point does the least work in supporting the speaker’s main argument?

    Correct Answer:

    Grilled cheese sandwiches are “not complete without meat” because “complete” and “meat” rhyme.

    Answer Explanation:

    (e) - This doesn’t even make sense.


  3. Suppose you disagree with the speaker. Which of the following arguments BEST contradicts the speaker’s argument that grilled cheese with meat is clearly superior because nobody in the world would refuse to eat one?

    Correct Answer:

    Just because a lot of people like a thing doesn’t make it the best thing in the world.

    Answer Explanation:

    • (a) - Case in point: whichever one-hit wonder has taken over your local radio station recently. *correct answer
    • (b) - True, but it doesn’t mean grilled cheese-and-meat isn’t the best, but rather that some people won’t try it.
    • (c) - Grilled cheese with meat in it could still be the best sandwich, even if your friend’s brother doesn’t like turkey.

  4. Which of the following would be the best way to disprove the speaker’s claim that you can only buy a cheeseburger in Paradise?

    Correct Answer:

    Buy a cheeseburger somewhere other than Paradise and show the cheeseburger and the receipt to the speaker and the audience.

    Answer Explanation:

    • (a) - Tempting, but not the best move.
    • (b) - This is direct evidence that the speaker is wrong about where you can buy cheeseburgers. *correct answer
    • (c) - Since this is hearsay, it is not as good as direct evidence. Either you or your mother could have made that story up, but it’s far less likely you faked a cheeseburger and a receipt.
    • (d) - The argument was that Paradise is the only place to get a cheeseburger, not that cheeseburgers are the only thing Paradise sells.
    • (e) - You can still get cheeseburgers there; you just can’t get them to go, apparently.

  5. According to the speaker’s original definition, does a cheeseburger count as one of the best sandwiches ever? Why or why not?

    Correct Answer:

    Yes, because it is a grilled sandwich that contains both meat and cheese.

    Answer Explanation:

    • (a) - The speaker throws in the location thing in the last sentence; it’s not part of the original definition, which is “grilled cheese with meat in it.”
    • (b) - correct answer

  6. Questions 6 - 10 are based on the following passage:

    “Making students wear uniforms is a terrible idea. First, making everyone wear the same thing kills creativity. How are students going to express themselves if we don’t let them pick out their own clothes? Second, uniforms are expensive, which makes it hard for children from poor families to afford school clothes. Finally, if everyone has to wear the same thing, students will not be able to recognize one another, and will always be calling each other by the wrong name. Therefore, we should not only ban school uniforms, but also give detentions to any students who arrive at school dressed alike.”

    Which of the following is NOT a reason the speaker gives for getting rid of school uniforms?

    Correct Answer:

    Students who wear uniforms spend more time in detention.

    Answer Explanation:

    (d) - The last sentence says that students who wear uniforms must be given detention—and not that they already spend more time in detention.


  7. Let’s suppose that you believe students should wear uniforms. Which of the following points would be the best way to undermine the speaker’s argument?

    Correct Answer:

    Schools can give scholarships to poor students so they can afford uniforms.

    Answer Explanation:

    • (a) - They can do that without uniforms, too.
    • (b) - Completely eliminates the speaker’s second point. *correct answer

  8. The scene: You are arguing with the speaker in front of an audience. A teacher raises her hand. She wants to know what she can do in her classroom to prevent her students’ creativity from being squashed. (Her students wear uniforms). Which of the following is the BEST advice to give this teacher?

    Correct Answer:

    Have students make posters that express their personalities, and then display the posters in class.

    Answer Explanation:

    • (a) - This is not something she can do in her classroom.
    • (b) - Not particularly creative; everyone is still wearing the same thing.
    • (c) - This is an in-class activity that encourages individualism and creativity. Plus the in-class posting helps take care of the “students don’t get to know each other” problem. *correct answer
    • (d) - Not particularly creative; it answers the identity question but not the creativity one.
    • (e) - Answers the poverty question but not the creativity one.

  9. The speaker says that students who dress alike must be put in detention. Which of the following reasons is the strongest argument against this?

    Correct Answer:

    Students who dress alike may also be expressing their creativity.

    Answer Explanation:

    • (a) - The speaker seems to think dressing alike kills student creativity. *correct answer
    • (b) - True, but the speaker doesn’t seem to care whether it was an accident or not – he or she just wants them all in detention.
    • (e) - Not likely, but even if it happened, detention wouldn’t make them remember.

  10. Let’s assume that you are the speaker in the above passage. Your debate partner has shot down every one of your points, and you’re scrambling to find a reason to support your point that students who dress alike should be put in detention. Which of the following points offers you the BEST chance of winning this debate?

    Correct Answer:

    Students who dress alike often do so because they are involved in gangs.

    Answer Explanation:

    • (a) - If true, then ALL kids should be in detention, and not just those who dress alike.
    • (b) - Why? And won’t that discourage team participation, or at least school spirit?
    • (c) - Thus, putting them in detention is a way to discourage gang activity, which impairs learning. *correct answer

Quiz 2 Questions

Here's an example of a quiz that could be used to test this standard.

For Questions 1 - 10, assume you are working with three co-workers, Bill, Will, and Jill, to create a presentation called “How to Get to Work On Time.” The four of you have to give the presentation to the rest of your office at the end of the week. Your boss has promised all four of you a big raise if you can complete the project as a team.

  1. The very first thing your co-worker Bill says is, “This presentation is stupid. I’d rather go water-skiing.” Jill and Will immediately agree. Which of the following arguments is NOT likely to convince them to stick around and work on the project?

    Correct Answer:

    “As long as we all get to work on time, who cares if anyone else does?”

    Answer Explanation:

    (d) - This will give them a reason to leave—not a reason to stay.


  2. Convinced by the strength of your arguments, Bill, Will, and Jill decide to stick around and work on the project. Which of the following is the MOST effective way to start working on the project?

    Correct Answer:

    As a group, brainstorm ideas on “how to get to work on time.”

    Answer Explanation:

    • (a) - You all have to work together and present different ways to get to work on time, so the logical first step is to come up with ways to get to work on time. *correct answer
    • (b) - Not working on the project.
    • (c) - The project is how to get to work on time at your workplace. Why are you asking people who don’t work there?
    • (e) - You’ll waste valuable time putting all four together into a whole, and that’s not really the “teamwork” your boss is looking for. Bye-bye, pay raise!

  3. Your co-worker Jill has the idea that your office should install a computer system that sends a wake-up call to each employee so they don’t oversleep. Which of the following is the WEAKEST argument against this idea?

    Correct Answer:

    Employees who wake up early usually make it to work on time.

    Answer Explanation:

    (b) - This argument also explains why they should get a wake-up call.


  4. You want to give everyone a worksheet so they can plan their mornings, leaving plenty of time to get to work. Your co-worker Will hates this idea. Assuming Will is acting rationally, which of the following is MOST likely his objection?

    Correct Answer:

    People who are already overworked won’t use a system that makes them do even more work.

    Answer Explanation:

    • (a) - This is a trivial point compared to (c), making (c) the better answer.
    • (d) - Even if true, this does not indicate your planning idea is bad, just that a technological method might be better.

  5. Since you think Will’s objection is wrong, you ask Bill and Jill what they think. Bill says, “That idea is stupid because you’re stupid! And that’s the ugliest shirt I’ve ever seen!” Is Bill’s input less constructive or more constructive than Will’s input, and why?

    Correct Answer:

    Less constructive - it’s a personal attack that has nothing to do with the project.

    Answer Explanation:

    • (a) - At least Will has an objection to the idea, and not to you personally. *correct answer
    • (c) - Maybe so, but (a) is still the better answer.
    • (d) - The plan should work or not work no matter how stupid or ugly Bill thinks you are.
    • (e) - True, but (a) is more specific and therefore is the better answer.

  6. Which of the following responses to Bill’s insult is MOST likely to get the group back on track?

    Correct Answer:

    “If we don’t want to use worksheets, what should we use?”

    Answer Explanation:

    • (a) - Continues the personal attack and has nothing to do with the project.
    • (b) - Still focuses on the personal and not the project.
    • (c) - Might goad Bill into sharing ideas, but continues the animosity and personal attacks.
    • (d) - Still personal.
    • (e) - Takes the conversation out of personal attacks and puts it back on the presentation, where it belongs. *correct answer

  7. After several more minutes of brainstorming, your group comes up with four ways to help your co-workers get to work on time. Which of the following is the LEAST likely to be one of the four?

    Correct Answer:

    Take shorter breaks so you’ll have more time to work.

    Answer Explanation:

    (e) - Might help those with time management problems once they get to work, but it won’t help them get there faster.


  8. Your group wants to give the audience some background information so they’ll understand why it’s important to get to work on time. Which of the following facts is MOST likely to convince them that employee lateness is a problem?

    Correct Answer:

    Late employees cost our business $5 million each year, which could be spent on pay raises or bonuses instead.

    Answer Explanation:

    • (a) - Might convince them that lateness is not a problem.
    • (b) - Gives a concrete number showing how much money is lost to lateness, and how the employees are losing out by not being there on time. *correct answer
    • (c) - The presentation is about getting there on time, and not on how long you stay after.
    • (d) - Raises the personal stakes, but is terribly unclear - how late is “late”?
    • (e) - No specific reason why employees should care.

  9. You want to use visual aids during the presentation in addition to talking. Your co-worker Jill just wants to talk. Which of the following is the BEST reason you can give Jill that you should use visual aids in addition to talking to give the presentation?

    Correct Answer:

    Some of your co-workers learn better by seeing information than by hearing someone say it.

    Answer Explanation:

    • (c) - Therefore, by diversifying your formats, you’ll give a presentation that reaches more attendees, making it arguably more effective. *correct answer
    • (d) - A fair consideration, but not the best reason - you should probably avoid using things just because you can.
    • (e) - Good visuals should enhance a presentation, not serve as your notes.

  10. Your boss calls you up the next day to congratulate your team on a great job. You want your boss to give you that promised raise, which was based on whether or not you and your co-workers worked as a team. What do you tell your boss?

    Correct Answer:

    “Thanks, boss. It was a team effort.”

    Answer Explanation:

    (a) - Gets the teamwork thing in without getting into any of the sordid details.


Quiz 3 Questions

Here's an example of a quiz that could be used to test this standard.

Questions 1-10 are based on the following scenario:

You are working with a group of researchers for a major technology company. You and your team members are trying to decide which of several promising-looking projects to devote your time and energy to.

  1. Your coworker Tyler says, “We should focus our research on developing mood pants. Mood rings were popular because they were the only way to tell if another person was happy, sad, hungry, or sleepy. People also enjoyed the pretty colors they made. Mood pants would be even more popular than mood rings because they would be easier to see from a distance, and also many boys and men will wear pants but not rings.”

    Tyler's main point is that:

    Correct Answer:

    Your team should focus its research on developing pants that reveal a person's mood.

    Answer Explanation:

    (c) - Tyler’s first line is, “We should focus our research on developing mood pants.”


  2. As Tyler is talking, you realize that the group doesn't understand that mood rings don't really predict mood; they just change color depending on how warm the wearer's hands are. Which of the following is the MOST effective way to explain Tyler's mistake to the group?

    Correct Answer:

    “Mood rings were a fun fad, but they weren't accurate at predicting moods.”

    Answer Explanation:

    (a) - This statement disagrees clearly and politely, and also gives your reason for disagreeing.


  3. Before you can explain Tyler's mistake, your coworker Casey intervenes. Casey says, “Wow, Tyler, you're a moron. Do you really believe that mood rings can read people's minds or something? We need to focus on researching useful technologies, like unicorn repellant. Did you know that unicorns destroy hundreds of thousands of acres of licorice trees every year?”

    Casey's main point is that:

    Correct Answer:

    Rampaging unicorns are a more pressing social issue than determining people's moods.

    Answer Explanation:

    (b) - He says, “We need to focus on researching useful technologies, like unicorn repellant.” This implies that unicorns are indeed a more pressing problem.


  4. Tyler, naturally, takes offense at being called a moron and begins to respond angrily. Before you can intervene, your coworker Dale says something that's meant to get the group back on track. Which of the following is MOST likely what Dale says?

    Correct Answer:

    “Let's not bash each other for our ideas, okay? Now, we've got mood pants and unicorn repellant. Does anyone else have an idea?”

    Answer Explanation:

    (d) - This is the most mature way of handling a volatile situation.


  5. “You're right,” says Casey. “I'm sorry I called you a moron, Tyler. Instead of unicorn repellant, what if we worked on an all-purpose repellant that scares away bugs and other creatures? We should focus on making it safe for people with allergies, who can't use other kinds of bug repellant.”

    Which of Casey's points supports the suggestion that the group focus on creating a new bug repellant?

    Correct Answer:

    A bug repellant that doesn't trigger an allergic reaction would be useful for people who can't use the bug repellants that currently exist.

    Answer Explanation:

    (e) - This statement provides good support for his suggestion to create a new kind of bug repellant.


  6. Dale asks for additional ideas, but nobody seems to have any, so you say that the group should decide which of the three projects it's going to work on. Which of the following is a democratic way to decide which project the group will take up?

    Correct Answer:

    “Let's take a vote on which project we'd like to work on.”

    Answer Explanation:

    (a) - This statement shows maturity and fairness.


  7. Since your group has never worked on bug repellant before, you realize that additional research will be needed. Which of the following will you need to do with the group in order to accomplish the research?

    Correct Answer:

    Schedule the research by discussing who in the group will be responsible for finding what information, and when and how each person will share their findings with the group.

    Answer Explanation:

    (c) - Making a schedule of activities with deadlines is the best way to accomplish a task.


  8. Throughout the entire meeting, you realize that one member of your group hasn't said a single word: your coworker Robin. Robin is a naturally quiet person, but you feel that it's important for everyone to participate. What can you do to help Robin participate?

    Correct Answer:

    Ask Robin, “Do you have anything you want to add? Any questions?”

    Answer Explanation:

    (b) - This will give Robin the opportunity to feel included and voice her concerns if she had not found the opportunity to speak before, and at the same time it won’t make her feel embarrassed or threatened.


  9. Even though Robin hasn't said anything during the meeting, you realize from looking at her notebook that she has been contributing to the group in a different way. Which of the following is MOST likely what you saw in Robin's notebook?

    Correct Answer:

    An outline of what the group discussed at the meeting and a to-do list of tasks the group should finish before its next meeting.

    Answer Explanation:

    (c) - This would be a valid contribution to the group.


  10. Before the group splits up, which of the following tasks should the members complete?

    Correct Answer:

    Determine who will be responsible for what work between now and the next meeting.

    Answer Explanation:

    (a) - A schedule always helps! It reduces confusion about who must do what, and also gives everyone a deadline to work towards.


Quiz 4 Questions

Here's an example of a quiz that could be used to test this standard.

Questions 1-10 are based on the following scenario:

You are stranded on a desert island with Stacy, Tracy, and Casey, three members of your weekend sports team. The four of you need to find food, water, shelter, and heat, and you need to work together in order to survive.

  1. The very first thing Tracy says is, “This is hopeless. We're never going to be rescued, so why bother?” Stacy and Casey immediately agree. Which of the following arguments is NOT likely to convince them to work on the group's survival?

    Correct Answer:

    “You're right. It's obvious no human being has ever set foot on this island.

    Answer Explanation:

    (d) - All the other answer choices suggest that you and the others have to work at surviving while this one isn’t directly relevant to that issue.


  2. Convinced by the strength of your arguments, Stacy, Tracy, and Casey decide to help you search for food, water, shelter, and heat. Which of the following is the MOST effective way to start taking care of your basic needs?

    Correct Answer:

    Brainstorm ideas on gathering food and water as a group.

    Answer Explanation:

    (a) - Working and thinking together will be most effective in a situation such as this.


  3. Casey suggests that your group can survive by eating coconuts. Having just returned from walking around the island, however, you know that there are no coconut-producing trees on the island. Which is the BEST way to point out Casey's mistake?

    Correct Answer:

    “Unfortunately, I didn't see any coconuts on the island, but there may be other kinds of edible fruit. Let's take a look.”

    Answer Explanation:

    (b) - This statement politely points out the flaw in the suggestion.


  4. You want to gather wood to start a fire before searching for food or shelter. Your co-worker Tracy hates this idea. Which of the following is the MOST rational objection to your idea?

    Correct Answer:

    It's starting to rain and the temperature is dropping, so your group may get hypothermia if they do not find shelter.

    Answer Explanation:

    (a) - This is a good reason with good support.


  5. Since you don't think the rain is all that serious, you ask Stacy and Casey what they think. Stacy says, “That idea is stupid because you're stupid! And that's the ugliest shirt I've ever seen!” Is Stacy's input less helpful or more helpful than Tracy's input, and why?

    Correct Answer:

    Less constructive – it's a personal attack that does nothing to help solve your current life-or-death problems.

  6. You're hurt by Stacy's comment, but you realize that the group has to get back on track or you may all die. Which of the following responses to Stacy's insult is MOST likely to get everyone to focus on fixing your current problems?

    Correct Answer:

    “If we don't want to build a fire first, what should we do instead?”

    Answer Explanation:

    (e) - Rather than giving in to Stacy’s jibes, you are sensibly focusing on the problems at hand.


  7. After a few more minutes of bickering, your group settles down and starts making a list of the things you will need to survive. Which of the following items is LEAST likely to be on that list?

    Correct Answer:

    Create a game using seashells, sticks, and pebbles.

    Answer Explanation:

    (d) - Entertainment is not at all important in a life-or-death situation.


  8. Casey tries to explain why it's more important to find water first than to find food or firewood. Which of the following facts is MOST likely to support Casey's point?

    Correct Answer:

    Human beings can live several weeks without food, but only a few days without water.

    Answer Explanation:

    (b) - This is great support for her point!


  9. You want to gather firewood while you search for water. Casey says that your group should look for water first and think about the firewood only after you've found water. Which of the following is the BEST reason you can give Casey that you should do both tasks at the same time?

    Correct Answer:

    It is more efficient to do both tasks at the same time.

    Answer Explanation:

    (c) - The other answer choices don’t make much logical sense.


  10. After three harrowing weeks on the deserted island, the four of you are rescued by a passing cruise ship. When you get home, reporters are swarming your house, trying to get you to tell them what happened. What do you say if you want to emphasize that everyone in your group was involved in your survival?

    Correct Answer:

    “Thank you for your interest, but it was a team effort.”

    Answer Explanation:

    (a) - You are gracious, as always!


Aligned Resources

More standards from College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening - Speaking and Listening