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Common Core Standards: ELA

Grades 9-10

Speaking and Listening SL.9-10.2

SL.9-10.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.

In addition to being able to read and understand information in writing, students need to be able to understand visual information, like pictures, charts, and graphs; quantitative information, like statistics and tables; and oral information, like spoken instructions or speeches. After all, studies show that 99 percent of all college classes and entry-level jobs use visual, quantitative, and oral communications, even if 62 percent of all statistics are made up on the spot.

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Example 1

Sample Activities for Use in Class

1. Do What Now?

Put the following definitions on the board or on handouts where students can see them:

Visual: Data presented so you can see it.
Quantitative: Data presented in numbers.
Oral: Data presented by speaking.

In small groups, have students create seven to ten flashcards. Each card should have either the word “visual,” “quantitative,” or “oral” on one side, and on the other side, an example of a way to present that information. For instance, “visual” might refer to a map or chart; “quantitative” might refer to a chart or equation, and “oral” might refer to a speech or song.

Example 2

2. Gotcha!

Once students have finished creating the notecards described above, have them trade cards with another group. Students should then read through the cards from the other group, keeping track individually of how many categories they were able to guess correctly. Cards should be read example-side up; for instance, a card that says “animation” should be read with this side up, with “visual” on the back. Students should not read the back of the card until everyone in the group has had a chance to guess at the answer.

Quiz 1 Questions

Here's an example of a quiz that could be used to test this standard.

  1. To present data “visually” means to present it in a way that is:

    Correct Answer:

    capable of being seen, such as with graphics

  2. Which of the following is an example of information displayed “quantitatively”?

    Correct Answer:

    a business’s balance sheets for its bank accounts

  3. To offer data “orally” means:

    Correct Answer:

    To present data by speaking

  4. One reason to present data visually is:

    Correct Answer:

    so that people have an image that explains what you’re talking about.

  5. One reason to present information in more than one format when speaking is:

    Correct Answer:

    so that the audience has many different ways to understand and learn the information

  6. Which of the following is an example of information presented “orally”?

    Correct Answer:

    a speech

  7. Suppose that you are working on a science project in which you count the number of guppies that are born in your fish tank each day. One way to present this information visually is to:

    Correct Answer:

    make a graph showing how the total number of guppies increased over time

  8. Which of the following is NOT a tool you might use to make a visual representation of your guppy data?

    Correct Answer:

    any of the above things could be used to make a visual representation of data

  9. Your guppy presentation has to include both a visual aid and an “oral report.” This means that you need to prepare:

    Correct Answer:

    something people can see, but no speech

  10. When creating your oral report on the guppies, you should consider:

    Correct Answer:

    whether or not everyone in the audience will be able to hear you

Quiz 2 Questions

Here's an example of a quiz that could be used to test this standard.

  1. To present data “quantitatively” means:

    Correct Answer:

    to present data in the form of numbers

  2. Which of the following is an example of data presented “orally”?

    Correct Answer:

    data explained by being talked about, like when giving a speech

  3. A visual aid has failed when it:

    Correct Answer:

    all of the above

  4. One reason to present data quantitatively is:

    Correct Answer:

    it is helpful when you need to discuss percentages

  5. One reason to present data in multiple formats is:

    Correct Answer:

    so that everyone in the audience can learn about it even if they are “words people” or “picture people” or “numbers people”

  6. When creating a visual aide to add to your presentation, you should consider:

    Correct Answer:

    all of the above

  7. You’re doing a science project in which you measure the number of cows lying down in a field each day. Your aim is to see if the old wives’ tale that “When cows lie down, it’s going to rain” is true. One way to present the information you gather quantitatively is:

    Correct Answer:

    make a chart showing how many cows were lying down each day and whether or not it rained that day

  8. Presenting your cow data quantitatively may make it hard for the audience to see. Which of the following things would help you solve that problem?

    Correct Answer:

    Make a graph of the cows and of the rainfall

  9. When planning the oral part of your cow presentation, you can improve your presentation by considering:

    Correct Answer:

    Whether you’re using words that everyone in the audience can understand

  10. Your teacher says that you should turn in a visual depiction of your cow data and an oral depiction, but not any quantitative information. This means that you should leave out:

    Correct Answer:

    the number of cows that lie down that you’ve noted down on every day on your calendar

Aligned Resources

More standards from Grades 9-10 - Speaking and Listening