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Analysis

Literary Devices in Jane Eyre

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

The red-room, once the bedroom of Jane’s Uncle Reed, was (we’re sure you remember) the chamber in which he died. Locked in the red-room, believing that her uncle’s ghost is manife...

Setting

Most of the place names we get in Jane Eyre are fictitious: they’re the names of houses (Gateshead Hall, where the Reeds live; Thornfield Hall and Ferndean Manor, Mr. Rochester’s places...

Narrator Point of View

The narrative point-of-view seems pretty straightforward here: our protagonist, Jane Eyre, tells us her own story in a novel called Jane Eyre. It’s written in the first person, and the centra...

Genre

We know, that’s five genres – but Jane Eyre is a complex book, OK? Think about it – there’s the whole following-Jane-from-her-sad-childhood-as-an-orphan-to-her-happy-marriag...

Tone

Because there is so much autobiographical material in Jane Eyre, it’s often difficult to separate Charlotte Brontë’s authorial tone from the narrative style of her protagonist. Oft...

Writing Style

You don’t have to read very far in Jane Eyre to notice that the syntax and style of the sentences are complex; phrases and clauses are elaborately interwoven, but still feel balanced and exac...

What’s Up With the Title?

So, this is a novel about a woman named Jane Eyre, and it’s titled Jane Eyre. Seems pretty obvious, that one. But think about this for a second: the novel itself is Jane Eyre, but the main ch...

What’s Up With the Ending?

Strangely, Jane Eyre doesn’t end with Jane Eyre herself. Oh, sure, at the beginning of the last chapter, we get that famous line, "Reader, I married him" (3.12.1), and we’re excited tha...

Plot Analysis

Jane is a poor orphan girl with nothing to help her in the world but a few nasty relatives and her education as a teacher of music, drawing, and French. OK, actually, it’s only the education...

Booker’s Seven Basic Plots Analysis: Rags to Riches

After a horrible childhood living with her aunt and cousins, Jane gets some solid education at Lowood Institute and becomes a teacher.Jane starts out, living at Gateshead Hall, as the lowest of the...

Three Act Plot Analysis

After a thorough but somewhat lonely education at Lowood Institute, Jane becomes the governess at Thornfield and quickly falls in love with her master, Mr. Edward Rochester.Jane and Rochester try t...

Trivia

Charlotte Brontë published Jane Eyre under the pseudonym "Currer Bell" because there was a lot of prejudice against women writers in the Victorian period. It’s not that women weren’...

Steaminess Rating

Jane Eyre is a Victorian novel, and so it does have a somewhat repressed feel. Even though one major strand of the plot is the passionate romance between Jane and Rochester, we don’t get too...

Allusions

Thomas Bewick, A History of British Birds (I.1, II.6)Samuel Richardson, Pamela (I.1)Oliver Goldsmith, History of Rome (I.1)Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels (I.3, II.6)John Milton, Paradise...
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