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The War of 1812

The War of 1812

Andrew Jackson in The War of 1812

Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) was a Major General in the United States Army during the War of 1812, and later served as the seventh president of the United States. He served in the United States House of Representatives (1796-97) and the United States Senate (1797, 1823-25), on the Tennessee Supreme Court (1798-1804), and as the military governor of Florida (1821). As a general in the Tennessee state militia he defeated the Creek Indians in 1814, and as a general in the United States Army he led a force into Spanish Florida during the Seminole War of 1818.

During the War of 1812, Jackson was appointed a Major General and sent to New Orleans to prepare the city's defenses against an impending British attack. His army of Tennessee and Kentucky volunteers defeated an invading British force of 7500 men and forced the British to withdraw from the region. The political future of the "Hero of New Orleans" was secured by this victory.

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