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A Rose for Emily

A Rose for Emily

by William Faulkner

A Rose for Emily Analysis

Literary Devices in A Rose for Emily

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

Miss Emily's house is an important symbol in this story. (In general, old family homes are often significant symbols in Gothic literature.) For most of the story, we, like the townspeople, only see...

Setting

Setting is usually pretty rich in Faulkner. SimCity-style, William Faulkner created his own Mississippi County, Yoknapatawpha, as the setting for much of his fiction. This county comes complete wit...

Narrator Point of View

The fascinating narrator of "A Rose for Emily" is more rightly called "first people" than "first person." Usually referring to itself as "we," the narrator speaks sometimes for the men of Jefferson...

Genre

Even before we see the forty-year-old corpse of Homer Barron rotting into the bed, the creepy house, and the creepy Miss Emily let us know that we are in the realm of horror or Gothic fiction. Comb...

Tone

We can think of a bunch more adjectives to describe the tone of the story, these seems to be the dominant emotional tones the narrator is expressing as Miss Emily's story is told. (Keep in mind tha...

Writing Style

While Ernest Hemingway boils things down to the essentials, his friend William Faulkner lets the pot boil over, spilling onto the stove, down onto the floor, and maybe somehow catching the kitchen...

What's Up With the Title?

You probably noticed that there is no rose in the story, though we do find the word "rose" four times. Check out the first two times the word is used:When the Negro opened the blinds of one window,...

What's Up With the Ending?

It's funny that a story as out of sequence as "A Rose for Emily" ends at the end – with the discovery of the forty-year-old corpse of Homer Barron. Readers and critics often feel that if the...

Plot Analysis

Death and TaxesAs we discuss in "Symbols, Imagery, Allegory," Faulkner might be playing on the Benjamin Franklin quote, "In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes," in...

Booker's Seven Basic Plots Analysis

Meeting Homer BarronAlthough she doesn't quite fit the profile a Booker tragic hero, Miss Emily has often been thought of as a very special tragic case. We think that applying Booker to her present...

Three Act Plot Analysis

The curtains open on the huge funeral of Miss Emily Grierson, which is taking place on the grounds of a decrepit southern house. The fact that nobody in town has been in Emily's house for a decade...

Trivia

William Faulkner is a character in David Cronenburg's Naked Lunch. (Source) William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway were friends.(Source)Or were they… Hemingway's take on Faulkner: "Poor Faulkn...

Steaminess Rating

We want to go with PG-13 on this one, because there is no sex mentioned. However, readers and critics take it all the way to necrophilia, though, in which case you'd have to bump the rating to an R...

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