From 11:00PM PDT on Friday, July 1 until 5:00AM PDT on Saturday, July 2, the Shmoop engineering elves will be making tweaks and improvements to the site. That means Shmoop will be unavailable for use during that time. Thanks for your patience!
We have changed our privacy policy. In addition, we use cookies on our website for various purposes. By continuing on our website, you consent to our use of cookies. You can learn about our practices by reading our privacy policy.
© 2016 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.

Power

You know that epic John Wayne-type cattle herder who sits out in front of their homestead on horseback with a Winchester rifle resting on their lap? Yeah, that's not really how it works anymore. It's more likely that you'll be sitting in the cab of a hybrid pick-up truck, filling out a bunch of paperwork.

 
I just bought your ranch, but I couldn't find your tie closet. Where is it? (Source)

Ranchers are also at the very low end of the food production line. Now that corporations are in on the food action, the mom and pop rancher is struggling to survive. If you're one of the lucky ranchers to own their own land, get ready to defend that land from corporate takeover.

And let's not forget all that wonderful government intervention (source). From the FDA's regulations on the food supply, to the Environmental Protection Agency's rules about farm waste disposal, to the IRS and its tax collectors, you're probably going to have more interaction with the Federal (and State) Government than you'd like. On the bright side, your congressperson will routinely be fighting to get you a bigger tax break, so at least you've got someone on your side.

That is, until some corporation pays them to vote against you. Ah, politics. It's all cow poo, even when it actually involves literal cow poo.

Advertisement