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Radiologist

Physical Danger

 
The junk food cabinet in the hospital break room sure isn't helping. (Source)

This is an intellectual job and can be good for creative thinkers, but you won't become a healthy geek by sitting in the dark eating Hot Pockets and chugging Pepsi One. Your body could be the target of stress-related illnesses if you don't practice what you preach, medically speaking.

And then there's the radiation. You're working in nuclear medicine, for goodness sakes. In reality, highly trained technicians and assistants will be doing the button-pushing on the X-rays, MRIs, CT and PET scans, but medical students always wonder: is it safe to be around radiation for the rest of my career?

Fortunately, the answer is yes. Unfortunately, it won't grant you any super powers.

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