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Power

You want power? With this job, you got it. And in more than horses.

As a repo man, you'll be taking away someone's mode of transportation, usually with a degree of surprise involved. This means the debtor won't be able to get to work, take her kid to the doctor, go to the grocery store, pick up his prescriptions, take his dog Max to the vet, and so on. If the debtor lives in a neighborhood with no bus service, you'll really be cramping her style.

Despite the fact that you are legally in the right, you might wrestle with the fact that you are single-handedly destroying a person's most convenient method of living his life. If you thrive on making other people miserable, or feel no degree of sympathy for people who can’t pay their bills, this might not bother you. But, as one real-life repo man told us, "While you're legally in the right, morally, you sometimes face a conundrum about whether you're doing the right thing. But that's something you need to reconcile when you're alone by yourself in the dark of night."

As Bob Dylan says, "We all work for The Man, one way or another."

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