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One Perfect Rose

One Perfect Rose

  

by Dorothy Parker

One Perfect Rose Analysis

Symbols, Imagery, Wordplay

Form and Meter

Like a perfect rose, this poem is well-put together. It's got a very regular pattern that makes it easy to follow. For example, just consider the rhyme scheme at work here: ABAB. The end of every o...

Speaker

Although it's never explicitly stated, based on the poet and the scenario that unfolds in the poem, we can say that it's a safe bet that our speaker's a woman. And she's not easy to please either,...

Setting

We get very little in the way of setting in this poem. We think that perhaps the thing that most acts as the setting here is the speaker's relationship with the fellow who sent the rose. That rose...

Sound Check

It's hard not to feel like we're sitting across from Dorothy Parker listening to her talk when we read "One Perfect Rose." Phrases like "all tenderly," "do you suppose," and "Ah no, it's always jus...

What's Up With the Title?

One. Perfect. Rose. The title suggests a few different things. We all know that roses and love go together like butter and toast, so from reading this title we might think that it's safe bet that t...

Calling Card

If you take a peek at Enough Rope, the volume of poems in which "One Perfect Rose" appeared, you'll notice that Parker was a little annoyed with men. Take a poem like "Men," for example, which conc...

Tough-o-Meter

"One Perfect Rose" is a pretty simple little poem. There are no crazy, outdated words, and the sentences are nice and short. The poem's colloquial language also makes us feel as though we are talki...

Trivia

When she died in 1967, Dorothy Parker left her estate to Martin Luther King Jr.! (Source.) Parker co-founded the Screen Writer's Guild. (Source.) Dorothy Parker was twice nominated for an Oscar for...

Steaminess Rating

We're sorry: no sex. Nope. Everybody has their clothes on, and the most frequent visitor is a flower. Yeah, we know that that's kind of a let-down in a poem that, from its title, promise all sorts...

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