Study Guide

Apollo

  • Profile

    Apollo is one of the most popular gods, and everybody wants to worship him (back in ancient Greece he was a total rock star). Is it because he's the god of music and rocks out on the lyre? Is it because he's the god of prophecy and everybody wants to know the future? Who knows? But the bottom line is that Apollo is the coolest kid in school.

    Basic Information

    Name

    Apollo

    Nickname

    Pythian Apollo, Phobus, Phoebus, Apollo Apotropaeus, Sol, and many more

    Sex

    Male

    Current city

    Mount Olympus

    Work & Education

    Occupation

    God of Light, Prophecy, Music, Poetry, and Medicine
    Sun chariot driver

    Beliefs

    Political views

    Zeus

    Family & Friends (& Enemies)

    Parents

    Zeus (Dad), Leto (Mom)

    Siblings

    My twin sister Artemis (and a ton of half-siblings thanks to Zeus)

    Children

    Phaeton, Aristaeus, Asclepius, Troilus, Linus, Orpheus

    Relationships

    Relationship status

    Single (I've had really bad luck with the ladies.)

    Interested in

    Nymphs
    Goddesses
    Mortal women
    The occasional young man

    Favorites

    TV Shows

    Glee
    The X Factor
    American Idol
    House
    Showtime at the Apollo
    Friday Night Lights
    America's Got Talent

    Books

    The Complete Prophecies of Nostradamus
    Oedipus the King by Sophocles
    Macbeth by Shakespeare (I love the Weird Sisters)
    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (the prophecies in the Department of Mysteries are so cool)
    Fever 1793 by Laurie Halse Anderson
    The Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe
    When I was One-and-Twenty by A.E. Housman
    Annabel Lee by Edgar Allan Poe

    Music

    Mozart
    Joanna Newsom
    The Electric Light Orchestra
    KC and the Sunshine Band
    Israel Kamakawiwo'ole
    Dear Mama by Tupac Shakur
    St. Louis Blues by Bessie Smith
    Subterranean Homesick Blues by Bob Dylan
    The House of the Rising Sun by The Animals
    I am the Walrus by The Beatles

    Movies

    Apollo 13
    Drumline
    Ray
    Dreamgirls
    The Plague
    Walk the Line
    8 Mile
    Country Strong
    Almost Famous
    The Matrix
    Star Wars

    Activities & Interests

    Likes

    Laurel trees
    Lyres
    Magic 8-Balls
    Tarot cards

    Interests

    Medicine
    Music and Poetry
    Archery

    • Spotter's Guide

      You can't miss Apollo. He's handsome, clean-shaven and muscular with blonde hair. The god of light (and many other things) is extremely hard to miss, because a lot of times he's literally beaming. Don't be surprised if he's surrounded by a crowd of admirers when you find him.

      Physical Description

      Sex: Male
      Age: Early 20s
      Build: Slender, but fit
      Complexion: Pale
      Hair color: Golden brown
      Facial hair: None; clean-shaven
      Scars/marks/tattoos: None
      Jewelry or accessories: A crown of laurel leaves, a lyre
      Clothing: Nude, aside from the occasional scarves or wraps
      Armor: None
      Type of weapon: Bow and arrow

      Typical Companions

      • Artemis, his twin sister
      • Eros (Cupid)
      • Daphne, a lovely nymph who becomes a tree
      • Python, a monster

      Other Notes

      Known hangouts: The god is known to frequently chase young women through forests.

      Escape vehicle: Horse-drawn chariot, often pulling the sun behind it.

    • Sightings

      Jan 1, 1970 - Jan 1, 1970

      The Iliad

      Homer brings the gods into The Iliad as well, which tells the story of the mythic Trojan War. Most of the gods of Olympus take sides in the human war: Hera, Athena, and Poseidon are rooting for the Greeks, while Aphrodite, Ares, and Apollo fighting for the Trojans. Be sure to check out Book 7 and Book 16 for the detail on Apollo.

      Dec 20, 2019

      Oresteia

      The Oresteia is a trilogy of tragic plays (Agamemnon, Libation Bearers, and Eumenides) by the ancient Greek playwright Aeschylus. These plays are about how Orestes and his sister Electra take revenge on their mother for killing their father. As in any good Greek tragedy, the characters call on the gods for help, and Apollo and Athena become pretty involved in the third play.

      Dec 20, 2019

      Medea

      Euripides's play about Medea, the wife of the hero Jason, uses Apollo and the other sun god, Helios, as symbols. Learn all of the details here.

      Dec 20, 2019

      Oedipus the King

      In Sophocles' famous play about fate, Apollo's oracle at Delphi pops up pretty often.

      Dec 20, 2019

      Electra

      In Sophocles' tragic play, Apollo commands Orestes, Electra's brother, to kill their mother.

      Dec 20, 2019

      The Aeneid

      In the Roman poet Virgil's epic poem, Apollo's various oracles, especially Sibyl, provide the hero Aeneas with prophecies.

      Dec 20, 2019

      The Metamorphoses

      The Roman poet Ovid collected all kinds of wild stories about the gods in The Metamorphoses. Here you'll find myths about Apollo, including those about his defeat of Python, his love for Daphne, and his music contest against Pan. Be sure to check out Book 1 and Book 11.

      Dec 20, 2019 - Dec 20, 2019

      A Winter's Tale

      In this Shakespeare play, the characters doubt Apollo's Oracle, but then pray to him for forgiveness in Act 3, Scene 2.

      Dec 20, 2019

      "The Hymn of Apollo"

      Check out this poem to Apollo, the god of poetry, written by the Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley (that would be the Frankenstein lady, Mary Shelley's, husband).

      Dec 20, 1968

      Star Trek, "Who Mourns for Adonais?"

      In this Star Trek episode, Apollo appears on the starship Enterprise: "A powerful being claiming to be the Greek god Apollo appears and demands that the crew of the Enterprise disembark onto his planet to worship him."

      Dec 20, 2019

      Percy Jackson and the Olympians Series

      Percy Jackson has run-ins with all of the gods of Olympus, including Apollo. We don't meet him in the first book, The Lightning Thief, but we meet many of his mortal children (they fill a whole cabin at Camp Half-Blood). His first appearance is in the third book, The Titans Curse.