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Analysis

Literary Devices in Medea

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

Medea's killing of her children is symbolic in several ways. First, the boys are a pretty clear representation of Medea and Jason's marriage, as they are the product of what was once a loving relat...

Setting

Medea is set in a city-state called Corinth. It's interesting that, though most Greek tragedians lived in Athens, their plays are hardly ever set there. In fact, they weren't allowed to do so. Gues...

Genre

We say the play is a drama because, well, you know…it's a play, a piece of literature that can only be fully appreciated when presented before a live audience. More specifically we dub it a t...

Tone

Overall, Medea doesn't exactly paint a pretty picture of humanity. For one, its two main characters don't have too much in the way of positive qualities. Jason forsakes his wife, Medea. Medea kills...

Writing Style

Medea is an unabashed polemic, meaning that Euripides has some pretty specific opinions and he wasn't afraid to talk about it. The play is still, to this day, one of the most radical texts of femin...

What's Up With the Title?

After extensive research, including the consultation of eminent scholars and the examining of ancient texts, we are prepared to declare, once and for all, the meaning of the title. It's a play abou...

What's Up With the Ending?

The ending of Medea has caused debate for thousands of years. It's chock full of contradictions and conundrums. For one, it defies the conventions of tragedy by letting its protagonist off the hook...

Tough-o-Meter

Sure it's a Greek tragedy, so you've got some pretty long speeches and heightened language to contend with. However, there's plenty of action to keep it interesting. Euripides, being the most moder...

Plot Analysis

Medea mourns Jason's betrayal.At the start of the play, Medea is a mess. Her husband, Jason, has married King Creon's royal daughter. Medea's slaves, the Nurse and the Tutor, worry about what terri...

Booker's Seven Basic Plots Analysis: Tragedy

Medea plots bloody revenge.Medea, like many tragic heroes and heroines, starts off with single minded determination. No matter what it takes, she's going to make Jason pay for taking another wife....

Three Act Plot Analysis

Medea is in the depths of despair, because her husband, Jason, has married a new wife, the daughter of Creon, King of Corinth. The news only gets worse when Creon shows up to tell Medea that she an...

Trivia

Euripides was divorced twice, once because his wife cheated on him. (Source)The Cyclops, by Euripides is the only extant (still in existence) satyr play. (Source)According to legend, Euripides was...

Steaminess Rating

There's no sex in Medea. Our heroine does spend a good amount of time chewing out her unfaithful husband, Jason, for lusting after his new virgin wife. The unfortunate Jason doesn't get much of a c...

Allusions

Argo, the ship that Jason sailed on when he went to get the Golden Fleece (1, 59, 204)Pelias (1, 59)Themis (26, 27, 30)Artemis (26)Zeus (27, 30, 46, 193, 205)Hecate (57)Sisyphus (57)Helios (57)Apol...
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