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Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights

  

by Emily Brontë

Wuthering Heights Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

The Oak-Paneled Bed

You'll Find It in the Deadroom—Er, BedroomNever underestimate the power of the Gothic novel in turning anything—a friendly animal or a dang bed—into a terrifying symbol. Usually the discussio...

Windows, Doors, Thresholds, and Other Boundaries

None Shall PassSeriously: if we saw any architecture as grim as the kind found in this book, we'd be running the other way. These mansions sound more imposing than nuclear waste storage facilities....

Doubles and Opposites

Two Cathys are Better than OneWhat is with all of the doubles and opposites in the novel? Wuthering Heights vs. Thrushcross Grange. Civilization vs. nature. Edgar Linton vs. Heathcliff. And let's n...

Ghosts

The Ghost With the MostWe're not exactly talking about Gryffindor Tower's Nearly Headless Nick here, but there are definitely some haunting figures in Wuthering Heights. It is important to note, th...

Nature, Weather, and the Moors

Please, Sir. Can I Have Some Moors?The moors pop up in approximately half a gajillion British novels. They're to the United Kingdom what the desert is to the USA: a place with a startling beauty th...

Dogs

It's a Dog-Eat-Dog World There are dogs running all over this novel, and they actually play a pretty big role in propelling the plot. Good dog(s)!These dogs figure in several major scenes and tend...

Houses

Master of the HouseWell, we know by the book's title that houses are pretty important here. But never—we repeat, never—underestimate the power of real estate in propelling the British novel.Hea...

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