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Analysis


Symbols, Imagery, Allegory

We don't want to push you to read The Kite Runner as an allegory. Please don't picture us on a street corner, whispering to passersby, "C'mon, try reading this as an allegory. You'll feel really go...

Setting

The Kite Runner spans multiple countries and multiple decades, but at its center is Afghanistan. Even when the novel shifts settings to the United States, Hosseini describes (in loving detail) the...

POV/Narrative Voice

Amir narrates all of The Kite Runner, except for a tiny chapter late in the book, which Rahim Khan takes over. There's no question: it makes sense that Amir would tell his own story. How better to...

Genre

If we were to simplify The Kite Runner beyond all reason and good sense, we would say this: the book follows Amir from birth to middle age. Or, we would say: this is a really long coming-of-age sto...

Tone

You don't often see these three walk into a room together. But here they are. Hosseini definitely likes to pull at the old heartstrings in this novel. For example, to have Baba spend his life-savin...

Style

There's not much to say about the writing style: it's bare, stripped down, and more or less recedes into the background. Hosseini is much more interested in plot development and irony than in dazzl...

What's Up With the Title?

So, this is a catchy title. That's probably the first thing you notice about it. The second thing you might notice about the title is that Hosseini didn't name the book The Kite FIGHTER. Which mean...

What's Up With the Ending?

OK, so without the force of the preceding paragraphs and chapters, the ending to The Kite Runner is going to sound like one big non-event. This is pretty much what happens: Amir and Sohrab are at a...
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