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Treasure Island

Treasure Island

by Robert Louis Stevenson

Treasure Island Analysis

Literary Devices in Treasure Island

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

The whole idea for Treasure Island started with Robert Louis Stevenson and his girlfriend's son designing an imaginary island together, so it should be no surprise that a map of Treasure Island pla...

Setting

Treasure Island is supposed to be set in the 18th century, but we don't see any signs of this historical disjunction from the time it was written, except maybe that pirates seem marginally more bel...

Narrator Point of View

Jim is both the narrator and the central character of the book, which means that we follow his personal view of events from his encounter with Billy Bones at the Admiral Benbow Inn to his departure...

Genre

Technically, Treasure Island is an example of historical fiction, because it's set in the 1700s, a century before it was published. Still, the "historical" part of this novel's genre is much less i...

Tone

As our narrator, Jim Hawkins definitely has a flair for the dramatic. He likes to remind us that he's involved in a high-stakes search for treasure. The potential reward is enormous (gold bars) but...

Writing Style

Treasure Island is an adventure story. If there's one thing that Indiana Jones, that dude from Avatar, and Jim Hawkins all seem to agree on, it's that if you're looking for adventure, you have to g...

What's Up With the Title?

We have a question for you: do you like treasure? And do you like islands? Yes to both, right? We think Robert Louis Stevenson was banking on the popularity of both when he called his first novel T...

What's Up With the Epigraph?

"To the Hesitating Purchaser"If sailor tales to sailor tunes, Storm and adventure, heat and cold, If schooners, islands, and maroons, And buccaneers, and buried gold, And all the old romance, retol...

What's Up With the Ending?

The plot of Treasure Island is pretty gosh-darned simple. It's about treasure and pirates – that's about it. The complicated twists and turns of how Jim deals with the pirates to get the treasure...

Tough-o-Meter

Treasure Island is an adventure novel. Stevenson spends most of the book crafting cool twists and turns for the plot, and goes light on heavy-duty philosophizing and character development. So it's...

Plot Analysis

Jim Hawkins joins Squire Trelawney and Doctor Livesey in the coastal town of Bristol to prepare for their treasure hunt. Explanation/Discussion:Because this novel has a lot of plot, the set-up requ...

Booker's Seven Basic Plots Analysis

Jim Hawkins doesn't exactly start out in rags, but he's not a wealthy kid. His parents own an inn, but his father passes away in the first chapters of the novel. His mother is clearly concerned abo...

Three-Act Plot Analysis

Jim Hawkins is a boy working at his parents' inn when a drunken old sailor comes to stay. This sailor, Billy Bones, has a treasure map leading to the buried hoard of fearsome pirate Captain Flint....

Trivia

Since Robert Louis Stevenson was just starting out when he published Treasure Island, the editor of the magazine Young Folks suggested that he publish his work under the pseudonym "Captain George N...

Steaminess Rating

Since this is a Victorian novel for kids, it will come as no surprise that there is absolutely no hanky-panky going on. Pretty much all the excitement Stevenson offers us is bound up in drinking an...

Allusions

Admiral John BenbowBlackbeard (6.22)Admiral Edward Hawke (7.13; 2.8.15)The battle of Fontenoy (16.8; 4.21.2)King George II (30.16)" Lillibullero " – Irish marching song (16.2., 4.16.4, 4.16.21)"...

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