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Best of the Web

Best of the Web

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Hamlets All the Way Down

Back to the source: here's the 12th century account of Amleth, Prince of Denmark.

All the Bard You Want

And possibly more. The BBC has a slew of Shakespeare resources.

We Won't Tell

Need a little line-by-line help? Check out this funny modern adaptation at Hamlet for the Shakespeare-Impaired.

Get on Stage

The folks at This is Hamlet break it down, talk-show style.

Check out this list of actors performing the "To be or not to be" soliloquy. Which version do you like best?

Movie or TV Productions

Black and White and Bloody All Over

Laurence Olivier's 1948 adaptation.

Well, I Remember Mel Gibson Accurately

Glenn Close and Mel Gibson take on Denmark in 1990.

Co-Credited

It doesn't get classier than Kenneth Branagh (1996).

Denmark Corporation

In this 2000 adaptation with Ethan Hawke, Denmark is a NYC-based corporation.

Dr. Seuss-style, in 1995.

Green Eggs and Hamlet

Dr. Seuss-style, in 1995.

Articles

The Dark Knight

This article in The Guardian asks if Batman is a Hamlet for our time. Pretty cool!

Still a Mystery

People have been trying to figure out Hamlet since at least the beginning of the nineteenth century—like famous essayist William Hazlitt.

Mo' Money, Mo' Problems

T.S. Eliot takes on the problem of Hamlet in The Sacred Wood: Essays on Poetry and Criticism.

Stages of Grief

For a modern take on Hamlet, here's Meghan O'Rourke arguing that Hamlet's not depressed—he's grieving.

Video

Doctor Who/ Jean-Luc Picard

The entire 2008 Royal Shakespeare Company production of Hamlet, with David Tennant and Patrick Stewart. Well, we know what we're doing tonight.

Dude Looks Like a Lady

Sarah Bernhardt in her fencing scene. Filmed in 1899!

Audio

Method or Madness?

In this NPR segment, Hamlet goes on trial.

Liberation!

The entire audiobook of Hamlet—free. Results may vary.

Images

Flowers and All

John Everett Millais painted Ophelia in 1851-52.

Well, He Does Call Himself a Woman

Here's Sarah Bernhardt playing Hamlet, sometime between 1885 and 1900.

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