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Quotes

Quote #1

They walked arm in arm, occupying the whole width of the street and taking in every Musketeer they met, so that in the end it became a triumphal march. The heart of D’Artagnan swam in delirium; he marched between Athos and Porthos, pressing them tenderly. (5.119)

The friendship between the four men begins after they fight together against the Cardinal’s men.

Quote #2

Notwithstanding all the pains he took, D’Artagnan was unable to learn any more concerning his three new-made friends. He formed, therefore, the resolution of believing for the present all that was said of their past, hoping for more certain and extended revelations in the future. (7.29)

Despite the four friends sharing everything, there are sacred secrets that cannot be shared. This adds an element of mystery to the novel and a layer of complication to the friendship.

Quote #3

In fact, four men such as they were—four men devoted to one another, from their purses to their lives; four men always supporting one another, never yielding, executing singly or together the resolutions formed in common; four arms threatening the four cardinal points, or turning toward a single point—must inevitably, either subterraneously, in open day, by mining, in the trench, by cunning, or by force, open themselves a way toward the object they wished to attain, however well it might be defended, or however distant it may seem. The only thing that astonished D’Artagnan was that his friends had never thought of this. (8.9)

D’Artagnan feels that together, the four can achieve anything. This is borne out in the rest of the novel as they overcome one obstacle after another. Their friendship is enhanced by complete generosity – they share absolutely everything.

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