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A Farewell to Arms

A Farewell to Arms

  

by Ernest Hemingway

A Farewell to Arms Foreignness and the Other Quotes

How we cite our quotes: Citations follow this format: (Chapter.Paragraph)

Quote #7

"He’s done nothing but ruin you with his sneaking Italian tricks. Americans are worse than Italians." (34.39)

This makes us remember an earlier scene where Frederic calls Rinaldi a "dago," among other things. This rare moments pop up in moments of communication frustration. When communication fails, everything seems foreign.

Quote #8

"Switzerland is down the lake, we can go there." (34.109)

The romance of their big escape intensifies the tragedy of the novel.

Quote #9

"Can’t you realize we’re in Switzerland?"

"No, I’m afraid I’ll wake up and it won’t be true." (37.)

Switzerland represents that ideal: neutral ground. It’s a dream almost too big to hope for.

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