Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Themes

Little Words, Big Ideas

Love

No matter what Stephenie Meyer wants to believe, Austen is much more Married with Children than Twilight. There are a lot of marriages, but not much love to go around. That's because...

Marriage

From our 21st century perspective, the concerns of Pride and Prejudice might seem trivial. Who cares if the Bennet girls ever get married? Can't they just go on living their fabulous single lives a...

Wealth

Money makes the world go 'round, especially if you're a young woman trying to get married in Regency England. The five Bennet daughters have almost no money, which means no way to entice men to mar...

Society and Class

We hear you: if everyone in this novel is so concerned about money, why don't any of them have jobs? Because we're talking about a specific class: the gentry. Austen never (or almost never) writes...

Women and Femininity

Pride and Prejudice may start off with the anonymous figure of a rich, single man, but the novel is actually concerned with the plight of the poor, single woman. Most of the women we see here (the...

Family

If you think your family is embarrassing, try having a satirical father, an idiot mother, two hopeless flirts for youngest sisters, and a nerd for a middle sister (and not the cool kind of nerd). Y...

Deceit

Sure, Wickham fools everyone. But Pride and Prejudice is really interested in self-deceit: the lies we all tell ourselves. You know, like, "I'm totally going to start dieting tomorrow"; or, "From n...

Language and Communication

In a society where you aren't really supposed to say what you're thinking—witness all the trouble Lydia gets into—it's no easy task to express feelings, correct mistakes, and give context for y...

Principles

In Pride and Prejudice, characters are divided into certain types. There are those who just regurgitate whatever principles they've been taught without much understanding of either the context or a...

Pride

Pop quiz: in Pride and Prejudice, who represents pride, and who represents prejudice?Okay, we confess: it was a trick question. Turns out, almost everyone's guilty of pride, with maybe the exceptio...

Prejudice

Let's get something straight: Pride and Prejudice has nothing to do with racial prejudice. (If you want to read about that, Shmoop has plenty of options.) Jane Austen is a white lady talking almost...
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